diabetestalk.net

Morning After Pill Diabetes

Lets Talk About Sex | Young People With Type 1 Diabetes Sex Lives

Lets Talk About Sex | Young People With Type 1 Diabetes Sex Lives

DUK THE HIGHS. DUK THE LOWS. DUK DIABETES. MADE BY YOUNG PEOPLE WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES. There are a variety of forms of contraception available.You'll need to talk to your nurse or Women with diabetes who take the Pill are susceptible to the same - but no higher - risks Some women also notice a slight deterioration in their diabetes control this can normally be treated by changing the dose of insulin slightly. Your healthcare team will give you individual Below is a brief overview of different types of contraception. All forms of contraception have information on types of contraception ask your progestogen-only pill can be used by many women with diabetes and is over 99% effective if used as directed. Once given, can be forgotten for 12 weeks (Injection) to three years (Implant) and is over 99% effective. A small plastic and copper device that does not contain any hormone, but works by stopping sperm reaching an egg due to the release of copper. May also work by stopping a fertilised egg from implanting in the uterus. It lasts for five years, although it can be removed sooner and it doesnt effect diabetes. A hormone releasing version of the IUD, which acts on the womb lining in the same way as the combined pill. It lasts for five years, although it can be removed sooner. However, the hormone may affect blood glucose levels. They are between 95 and 98% effective if used properly. Do not affect blood glucose levels. This is a common yeast infection that causes genital itching and discharge in women, but in men theres generally no symptoms. Its more likely to happen if your blood glucose levels are high, so try to keep your diabetes under control. You can get buy treatment over the counter or get a prescription for a cream, peccary or tablet to treat it but its important to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

For women the monthly cycle and periods can cause blood glucose to change. Many young women said that their blood glucose levels tend to fluctuate between low and high before and after their periods. One young woman was prescribed a contraceptive pill to regulate her periods and she expects to take it until her twenties or when her blood glucose levels become more stable. Another young woman stopped taking the pill because she found that her blood glucose levels went very high during the time of her period. All forms of contraception are suitable for women with diabetes. The combined contraceptive pill ('the pill') is one of the most common types of contraception used by young women. It is very good at stopping you getting pregnant as long as it is taken according to the instructions but it does not stop you getting a sexually transmitted infection. So it is always best to use condoms whatever other method is used if there is any risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. Also, it is important to know what to do if you miss any of the pills especially pills 1-7 or 14-28 in the pack. If you do miss a pill or pills, check on the insert leaflet or phone and ask your doctor if you are unsure what to do. You might need emergency contraception and/or to use other forms of contraception such as condoms for the next seven days or it may be necessary to run two packets of pills together. Sometimes women go onto the pill to help regulate their periods and some women do find the pill helps. The mini pill, coils and contraceptive injections can also be used. Your doctor will be happy to tell you more about the various alternatives, their advantages and disadvantages and discuss the best form of contraception for you. Contraceptives and advice on their use can be obtained Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Birth Control

Diabetes & Birth Control

Diabetes & birth control at a glance Birth control pills, patches, implants, injections, and rings are generally considered to be safe forms of contraception for diabetic women, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). However, the estrogen in birth control pills can raise blood glucose levels, which increase a diabetic’s resistance to insulin and may require an adjustment in the insulin she receives. Because of the effects of estrogen, some physicians do not prescribe hormone-based birth control for some diabetic women. The ADA says that combination birth control pills containing synthetic estrogen and norgestinate are best for women with diabetes. The effect of birth control on diabetes The inconclusive results of various research studies have led to controversy over the potential harmful effect of birth control pills for diabetic women. Some studies show that women who take birth control pills or other methods containing estrogen have higher blood glucose levels and blood cholesterol levels. Other studies show no differences in those levels between women taking birth control pills and women who don’t. Factors to consider Higher glucose levels resulting from the estrogen in birth control pills may require an increase in a diabetic woman’s need for insulin. Higher cholesterol levels increase the risk of heart attack, and diabetics already have an increased risk of heart attack. Some physicians recommend that diabetic women take birth control pills with the lowest dose of estrogen possible for effective contraception. Other birth control methods that employ estrogen, such as implants, patches, injections and vaginal rings, can also affect a woman’s diabetes. Studies indicate that diabetic women who take birth control pills for more than two years ma Continue reading >>

Contraceptives And Diabetes

Contraceptives And Diabetes

In North America, many women are often prescribed birth control medication (often known as oral contraceptive pills or hormonal pills) for treating various conditions as well as preventing unplanned pregnancy. However, as contraceptive treatments become available without a prescription in the United States, many women lack the knowledge of the risks and side effects of these methods. For women who are in the prediabetes category or already suffering from type 1 or type 2 diabetes, these treatments cause severe problems with the blood glucose management. To better educate women about how contraceptive methods affect the blood glucose level and various diabetes symptoms, this article will be covering these topics below: How Does Hormonal Contraceptive Work? In order to explain how hormonal contraceptives affect the blood glucose level and other diabetes symptoms, it is imperative that we explain how a woman becomes pregnant and how the hormonal contraceptives work: What Happens When A Woman Becomes Pregnant? In order for pregnancy to occur, 2 things need to happen: 1. an egg is released from the ovaries during the ovulation period and is transported to the fallopian tube, and 2. a man’s sperm has successfully fertilized the egg. Once these two events occur, the fertilized egg will attach to the inside of the uterus. (from medical standpoint, pregnancy begins the moment the fertilized egg is attached to the uterus wall). This event allows the egg to receive nourishment from the mother so that it develop into a baby. In order to shut off the egg production and to sustain the fetus’ development, the secretion of estrogen and progesterone are highly elevated. As a result, some women develop gestation diabetes during their pregnancy. I advise you to read the following arti Continue reading >>

The Morning-after Pill & Other Emergency Contraceptives

The Morning-after Pill & Other Emergency Contraceptives

The Morning-after Pill & Other Emergency Contraceptives Emergency contraceptives, which are a form of birth control, are referred to by many names including the morning-after pill , the pill, Levonogestrel pill, Plan B One-Step, Next Choice and Ella . The purpose for the morning-after pill is to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, or after the birth control method has failed. According to Mayo Clinic, morning-after pills contain either levonorgestrel (Plan B One-Step) or ulipristal acetate (Ella). [1] The morning-after pill works one of three ways, depending on when it is taken after unprotected sex: [2] Delayed ovulation (normal menstrual cycle is altered) Inhibited ovulation (the egg will not be released from the ovary) Inhibit implantation of the newly formed baby (irritating the lining of the uterus -endometrium) Remember that fertilization, the moment when an individual child with its own DNA is formed, takes place in the fallopian tube. The newly-formed baby then travels down the fallopian tube to the uterus, where he or she attaches to the womb lining to receive nourishment and continue growing and developing. This process, the baby traveling from the fallopian tube to the womb, can take 5-7 days. During that time, the morning after pill could prevent the baby from attaching to the uterus lining, thus ending the babys life due to a lack of nourishment. Bleeding between periods or heavier menstrual bleeding There arescientifically-proven risks of levonorgestrel, [4] the active ingredient in Plan B, including: Significant weight gain (on average 15 pounds) Continue reading >>

Plan B (morning-after Pill): Effectiveness And Side Effects

Plan B (morning-after Pill): Effectiveness And Side Effects

Depending upon where you are in your cycle, levonorgestrel may work in one of these ways: It may interfere with fertilization of an egg. It is also possible that this type of emergency birth control prevents implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus by altering its lining. Levonorgestrel is not the same as RU-486, which is an abortion pill. It does not cause a miscarriage or abortion. In other words, it does not stop development of a fetus once the fertilized egg implants in the uterus. So it will not work if you are already pregnant when you take it. If you take it within 72 hours after you've had unprotected sex, levonorgestrel can reduce the risk of pregnancy by up to 89%. If you take Plan B One-Step within 24 hours, it is about 95% effective. But you should know that Plan B One-Step is not as effective as regular contraception . So don't take it as your main form of birth control . And, it does not protect you against sexually transmitted diseases . Think of it as a backup -- not for routine use. That's why it's called Plan B. Levonorgestrel can be purchased over the counter at drugstores without a prescription or proof of age. Because it is most effective when taken as soon as possible (up to 72 hours after sex), consider having a ready supply in your medicine cabinet. Better yet, use a reliable form of birth control, and plan for a backup method of birth control. You missed at least two or three active birth control pills in a row. You forgot to insert your ring or apply your patch. You have another reason to think your birth control might not have worked. Remember: levonorgestrel will not protect you from getting pregnant if you have sex after taking the pills. Instead, you need to take it right after you have unprotected sex. You know you are pregnant or s Continue reading >>

What Is The Safest Birth Control For Women With Diabetes?

What Is The Safest Birth Control For Women With Diabetes?

A recent study indicates that the absolute risk of thromboembolism in women with diabetes taking birth control is low. Thromboembolic events include venous thrombosis, stroke, and heart attack. Women with diabetes generally have a higher likelihood for these events than women without diabetes. Women on birth control generally have a higher risk for thromboembolic events that women not on birth control. The study sought to find out the safety of hormonal contraception regarding thromboembolic events in women with both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Researchers used data from 2002-2011 in Clinformatics Data Mart to pinpoint women in the US between ages 14 and 44 who had diabetes and a prescription for a diabetes medication or device. Then they looked at contraceptive claims and compared time to any case of venous thrombosis, stroke, or heart attack among women who had been prescribed hormonal birth control medication while controlling for age, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetic complications, and a history of cancer. Data for women in the three months after giving birth was not included. Does Birth Control Raise Risk of Thromboembolic Events in Diabetic Women? The researchers found 146,080 women with diabetes who had experienced 3,012 thromboembolic events. Of those women, 28 percent of reproductive-aged women with diabetes took hormonal contraception and most of them took estrogen-containing oral contraceptives. Thromboembolic events occurred mostly in women who used the contraceptive patch and lowest among those who used intrauterine and subdermal contraceptives. Researchers wrote in their study abstract that “Compared with use of intrauterine contraception, progestin-only injectable contraception was associated with increased risk of thromboembolism,” Continue reading >>

Contraceptive Pill And Diabetes

Contraceptive Pill And Diabetes

Tweet As a woman who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, there should be no reason why you cannot take birth control pills in safety. You should always consult with your doctor before taking the pill. Birth control pills Birth control pills generally fall into two types, although there at present 23 different brands of contraceptive pill on the UK market. Oestrogen and progestin The first contains the hormones oestrogen and progestin, and the second contains progestin alone. Combination pills, those that contain oestrogen and progestin, very rarely cause shifts in blood glucose levels and the ways in which the body controls them. Progesterone Pills which contain only progesterone don’t cause changes in blood glucose control. Further contraceptive methods such as injections and implants are also considered fairly safe for diabetics to use. Loss of control Many women experience a slight loss of control in blood sugars initially when they start taking the pill, but this can usually be rectified by a slight change in treatment regime. Contraceptive pill The contraceptive pill may indirectly complicate diabetes, however. Some of the side-effects of the pill may lead to increased risk of diabetes complications. High blood pressure, for instance, could increase your chance of contracting eye or kidney problems for diabetes. Diabetics who also smoke are advised to seek alternative forms of contraception. Some medical thinking implies that the oestrogen present in birth control pills can increase glucose levels whilst simultaneously decreasing bodily insulin response. Progestin present in birth control pills could also possibly lead to insulin overproduction. Some medical practitioners advise that taking the birth control pill should be limited only to those women who are younger t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Pill

Diabetes And The Pill

Weve updated our Privacy Notice. Take a moment to review it here. The Pill itself tends only to present difficulties for those diabetics who have particular diabetic complications, such as damaged blood vessels... I have been a diabetic for four years. I want to go on the Pill to combat heavy periods (menorrhagia) and painful periods (dysmenorrhoea), as well as to use as a contraceptive. Also if I go to my GP for the Pill, will I have to have an internal examination? The combined contraceptive pill is a very reliable and convenient oral contraceptive. You can expect it to help reduce heavy and prolonged periods too. The Pill itself tends only to present difficulties for those diabetics who have particular diabetic complications, such as damaged blood vessels, kidney and eye problems . I don't think there will be any significant problem with your glucose control. Concern about the Pill is more to do with the small risk that it can encourage inappropriate clots within blood vessels (thrombosis). This is more of an issue if you already have damaged arteries, or tend to have hypertension (high blood pressure), carry too much weight or smoke. A family history of heart problems or stroke (cerebrovascular accident) in young relatives (aged over 45 years) can be a significant factor against starting the combined pill. However, the suitability of other forms of contraception (such as barrier methods or the progestogen-only (POP) or mini-Pill need to be balanced against these concerns and the risk of unplanned pregnancy. It is really something you need to discuss with your doctor or a family planning clinic. There is no need to do an internal examination before starting the Pill, but is important to have a cervical smear test if you're sexually active. That is something you can Continue reading >>

New Contraception Options

New Contraception Options

Given that approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States every year are unplanned, birth control is an important consideration for all sexually active women at risk of becoming pregnant. In the case of women with diabetes, however, precision in family planning is even more crucial because of the effect of high blood glucose on the developing fetus. “There’s a very close correlation between blood sugar level and the incidence of birth defects in the offspring of women with diabetes,” says Jo M. Kendrick, MSN a clinical instructor at the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and author of Diabetes in Pregnancy (a guide for nurses). According to Kendrick, “Anytime you have a[n HbA1c] level of 7% or greater, there’s an increased risk of birth defects in the offspring or, as it rises even higher, an increased risk of miscarriage.” The HbA1c, or glycosylated hemoglobin, test gives an indication of average blood glucose control over the previous 2–3 months. People who don’t have diabetes generally have an HbA1c level between 4% and 6%. Because of these risks, women with diabetes are advised to bring their blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible before attempting to conceive. In addition, any woman with diabetes who is considering having a baby should have a physical exam and a laboratory assessment to look for any evidence of vascular (blood vessel) disease, since pregnancy can put a great deal of stress on the vascular system. Having eyes and kidney function assessed is another important part of preconception care for women with diabetes. According to Kendrick, “We very strongly encourage women to get an eye exam to make sure that they don’t have any retinopathy, an EKG [ele Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Birth Control

Type 2 Diabetes And Birth Control

Some methods of contraception can have an effect on your blood sugar. Learn about birth control options for women with type 2 diabetes. A woman who has type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, has to face the same issues that confront most women, such as choosing a birth control method. However, unlike women who don’t have diabetes, she must take into account about how the form of contraception she chooses will affect her blood sugar levels, as well as the rest of her body. Type 2 Diabetes and Birth Control Pills In the past, birth control pills weren’t usually recommended for women with diabetes because of the hormonal changes the medication could cause. High doses of hormones can have a dramatic effect on blood sugar levels, making it harder for women to control their diabetes. However, research into new formulations has resulted in many different, lighter combinations of hormones. These new pills are safer for many women, not just those with diabetes. According to Brian Tulloch, MD, endocrinologist at Park Plaza Hospital and Medical Center and clinical associate professor at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, a woman with type 2 diabetes who chooses to use birth control pills should take the lowest possible dose that is still effective in order to help limit the effects the medication has on the diabetes. One thing women taking birth control pills should remember is that there is still an increased risk for heart attack or stroke among women who use this form of contraception. Since people with diabetes also have an increased risk of heart disease, this is something that women should discuss with their doctors. Type 2 Diabetes and Other Hormonal Contraception Birth control pills aren’t the only way Continue reading >>

Emergency Contraception: When To Take Pregnancy Test

Emergency Contraception: When To Take Pregnancy Test

Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You The Emergency Contraception Website - Your website for the "Morning After" Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About... When can I take a pregnancy test and be sure that it is accurate? If it has been at least 10 days since you had unprotected sex and you have not gotten your period when you think you should have, you can take a home pregnancy test to find out if you are pregnant. Before that, a negative test result wont be accurate, and you definitely cant tell if youre going to get pregnant in the first few days after sex the time when you would be taking emergency contraceptive pills (sometimes called " morning after pills " or "day after pills"). If the test is negative but you are still worried, you can take a second home pregnancy test in another week. If the result is positive, you should contact your health care provider to discuss your options, including prenatal care or abortion . If you think you might already be pregnant because your period is late, you can take a home pregnancy test before using emergency contraception although its not necessary from a medical standpoint. Emergency contraceptive pills wont work if you are already pregnant, and they will not harm you or your fetus (although evidence for ella is still limited). Remember, emergency contraception significantly reduces the chances that you will become pregnant if you had sex and your birth control failed, you didnt use contraception, or you were forced to have sex . If you have had sex and think that you might be at risk of pregnancy, take action right away to find out what your options are for emergency contraception. Clinical studies show that ella is effective for 5 days after unprotected sex, and that progestin-only pills (like Plan B One-Step o Continue reading >>

Morning After Pill | Home Abortion Methods | Self Abortion Methods

Morning After Pill | Home Abortion Methods | Self Abortion Methods

Home > Choices > Abortion Information > Morning After Pill Plan B is currently the most commonly prescribed emergency contraception or morning after pill. Plan B is an extremely high dosage of chemical hormones. Plan B is thought to work by delaying ovulation (the release of the egg from the ovary), by interfering with fertilization (the penetration of the egg by the sperm), or by interfering with implantation (the attachment of the fertilized egg to the wall of the uterus). Women considering the use of emergency contraception need to be aware that pregnancy can only occur on certain days of the month, there may not be a need for emergency contraception. Typically, there are approximately three to five days a month in which a woman can get pregnant. It is important to evaluate whether taking a high dosage of chemical hormones with the possible side effects are the best action to take. According to the manufacturers of Plan B, women who have a known or suspected pregnancy should not take the pills. A pregnancy test should be performed. The emergency contraceptive pills do not work if you are already pregnant and may harm the baby. Our consultants are available to talk to you about your concerns. Call us at (831) 637-4020 or 1-800-395-HELP after hours. Know the Risks Associated with the Morning-After Pill The morning after pillPlan B is a relatively new drug; the long term effects with occasional or repeated use have not been studied. Some of the commonly reported side effects are nausea, abdominal pain, tiredness, headache, menstrual changes, dizziness, breast tenderness, and vomiting. Taking Plan B often causes irregular periods. A woman may experience heavier bleeding, lighter bleeding, or a delayed period. It may take time for a womens body to return to normal and st Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: The Best Birth Control For Fwds Is...

Ask D'mine: The Best Birth Control For Fwds Is...

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil's done some serious homework on a women-specific issue: Birth Control. But don't fear, men, this isn't just a post for those Females With Diabetes (FWDs). There's something in it for everyone. So, don't be afraid to read on! (Or print out and read later — this one's a doozy!) {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Kathleen, type 2 from Texas, asks: What do you think of Mirena as a birth control option for diabetics, especially those on insulin? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Seriously? The new-style intrauterine device (IUD) that's implanted into the wall of the uterus? You know I'm a man, right? And as such, I only have the vaguest of idea of where the uterus is in the first place. But even though I'm out of my league, and out of my gender, your question piqued my interest. I mean, come on, sex and diabetes—what more could I want to totally make my day? So I read up on Mirena, then I started calling all the female diabetes docs I know. They told me that there's no nationwide standard recommendation for birth control for female diabetes patients, and no one agrees on what's best. It turns out that the entire subject of birth control for FWDs is more complex than you'd think. In fact, birth control options for any female are more complex than I had realized, so we're going to devote today's entire column to the subject. Not just Mirena, but the full spectrum of options for my diabetic sisters. Mirena and Garden Variety IUDs But since you asked about Mirena, we'll start there. It's an IUD, a small plastic device that looks a bit like a boat anchor. I should make some sort of jok Continue reading >>

Birth Control And Breastfeeding

Birth Control And Breastfeeding

Most methods of contraception that women use are not considered to be harmful to their breastfed children, but some forms of contraceptives can be very harmful to milk supply. Combination contraceptives Combination contraceptives contain both progesterone and estrogen and come in several different forms: combination birth control pill skin patch (Ortho Evra) vaginal ring (Nuvaring) Estrogen-containing contraceptives have been linked to low milk supply and a shorter duration of breastfeeding even when started when baby is older, after milk supply is well established. Not all mothers who take contraceptives containing estrogen will experience a low milk supply, but these unaffected mothers appear to be a very small minority. Thomas Hale, PhD (author of Medications and Mothers’ Milk) notes, “Mothers who have problems with milk production and those who are breastfeeding an older child (one year old or more) should be especially cautious.” Now infants can get all their vitamin D from their mothers’ milk; no drops needed with our sponsor's TheraNatal Lactation Complete by THERALOGIX. Progestin-only contraceptives Progestin-only contraceptives are the preferred choice for breastfeeding mothers when something hormonal is desired or necessary. Progestin-only contraceptives come in several different forms: progestin-only pill (POP) also called the “mini-pill” birth control injection (Depo-Provera) progesterone-releasing IUD (Mirena, Skyla) birth control implant (Implanon, Nexplanon) For most mothers, progestin-only forms of contraception do not cause problems with milk supply if started after the 6th-8th week postpartum and if given at normal doses. However, there are many reports (most anecdotal but nevertheless worth paying attention to) that some women do experienc Continue reading >>

More in diabetes