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Mmr Vaccine And Type 1 Diabetes

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines cause diabetes another myth refuted and debunked If you cruise around the internet, engaging with the antivaccination cult (not recommended), you will pick up on their standard tropes, lies, and other anti-science commentaries. One that has always bothered me, not because that it was a lie, but because I had enough evidence floating in my brain that I was wondering if it were truethat vaccines cause diabetes, especially the Type 1 version. A lot of the vaccine deniers believe that vaccines cause a lot of everything and several claims that vaccines cause Type 1 diabetes (or here ), based on little evidence.As far as I can tell, this myth is based on the research fromJ. Barthelow Classen, M.D., who has pushed the idea that vaccines cause type 1 diabetes, through some magical process that has never been supported by other independent evidence . In another example of the antivaccination worlds cherry picking evidence to support their a priori conclusions, they ignore the utter lack of plausibility supporting any link between vaccines and Type 1 diabetes. At best, Classenhas cherry-picked statistics to support his predetermined conclusions, comparing apples to oranges with health data from different countries, and misrepresenting studies to back his claim . Moreover, Classen seems to come to his beliefs based on population-wide correlations that rely on post hoc fallacies , rather than actually showing causality between vaccines and diabetes. Its like finding that a 5% increase in consumption of Big Macs is correlated with Republican wins in elections. They may happen at the same time, but it would take a laughable series events to show any relationship. Its going to get a bit science-y in this section. Sorry about that, but diabetes is complicated, it never can be Continue reading >>

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

The 2012 report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) [1], now called the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), described a number of studies with sufficient validity and precision that all reported a lack of an association between MMR, DTaP or Tdap vaccines and type 1 diabetes [2-7]. Studies published since this report also reported a null, or in some cases even protective, association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes [8-12]. Studies examining inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnancy reported either no association with, or even a possible protective effect against, gestational diabetes [13, 14]. Persons with chronic illnesses such as type 1 or type 2 diabetes have high morbidity and mortality associated with common infectious diseases such as influenza, hepatitis b, and pneumococcal disease. Thus, routine vaccination per current ACIP recommendations is also strongly recommended for all persons with diabetes by the American Diabetes Association [15, 16]. In addition, the ACIP recommends the administration of hepatitis b vaccine to all unvaccinated adults with diabetes mellitus aged 19 through 59 [17]. Mechanisms that may induce type 1 diabetes include activation of the complement system, in which a cascade of proteolysis and successive release of cytokines functions to amplify the immune response but can damage host cells if not properly regulated, as well as molecular mimicry, which refers to the possibility that similar epitopes shared between self-peptides and foreign peptides (introduced via infection or immunization) inadvertently cause the activation of autoreactive T or B cells, leading to autoimmunity. However, the IOM concluded that there was no mechanistic evidence for an association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes, as the publication Continue reading >>

Viral Trigger For Type 1 Diabetes

Viral Trigger For Type 1 Diabetes

Pros and Cons The most popular hypothesis circulating within and beyond the scientific community is that viral infections enhance or elicit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Indeed, viruses can injure β-cells and have been isolated in pancreatic tissues from diabetic patients. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the opposite scenario, which is prevention or amelioration of type 1 diabetes, might be at least as common an outcome of viral infection. Here, we discuss epidemiological and experimental evidence for the main mechanisms accounting for the role of viruses in type 1 diabetes to better understand the complex relationship between viral infections and autoimmune diabetes. INSIGHT FROM EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS The influence of the environment. Type 1 diabetes is a genetic autoimmune disorder caused by autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells that recognize pancreatic antigens such as insulin or GAD and subsequently destroy insulin-producing β-cells. The subject of very active research is the question of how endogenous β-cell antigens become immunogenic. Infiltration of the islets of Langerhans, where β-cells reside, by activated autoreactive T-cells is considered to be the major driving force in type 1 diabetes progression. The islet infiltrate in humans consists primarily of CD8+ T-cells and B-cells, followed by macrophages and dendritic cells of different subtypes (1). Interestingly, significantly fewer T-cells are found in human islets compared with islets from nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The reduced numbers of T-cells, and in this way a limited autoreactive component in human islets, leads one to consider whether other contributing factors may be involved in disease development. Otherwise, sufficient insulitic infiltrate to de Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet Type 1 diabetes belongs to a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases are when the body incorrectly identifies its own useful cells as an attacking organism. In type 1 diabetes, it is the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin that are wrongfully targeted and killed off by specific antibodies created by the body’s immune system. Researchers have been investigating what may cause the immune system to act in this way but to date researchers have theories but no concrete proof. Genetic predisposition Researchers have uncovered a number of genetic regions that are linked closely with type 1 diabetes. Each of these is denoted with a name such as IDDM1. At least 18 different regions have been discovered and some of the genetic areas include an increased susceptibility for other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. Whilst genetics offers clues as to why some people are more susceptible to type 1 diabetes, it doesn’t explain why some people with these genes develop type 1 diabetes and why others with these genes don’t. For example, having an identical twin with type 1 diabetes gives you a statistically higher risk but it doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop the condition. Genetics does not explain either why people will develop type 1 diabetes at different ages. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in 10 to 14 year olds but can be diagnosed at any age. Read more on diabetes and genetics Type 1 diabetes triggers Researchers have hypothesised that whilst some people are have a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes, there is likely to be an environmental factor that triggers the initial development of type 1 diabetes. Some of the possible triggers that have been suggested include: Continue reading >>

Reverse Vaccination And Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes Using Plant-produced Autoantigens And Anti-inflammatory Cytokines

Reverse Vaccination And Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes Using Plant-produced Autoantigens And Anti-inflammatory Cytokines

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune form of diabetes mellitus that accounts for about 10% of all diabetes cases and occurs predominantly during childhood or adolescence. The disease initiates when most of the insulinproducing -cells in the pancreas are destroyed by autoimmune cells, including T-helper 1 cells, cytotoxic lymphocytes and dendritic cells. The major autoantigens in T1D are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and insulinoma antigen. At-risk individuals with underlying islet inflammation can be identified by the presence of circulating autoantibodies to these specific islet antigens many years before the clinical onset of T1D, thus, providing a window for prevention strategies. Currently, there is no definitive cure for T1D; therefore, more effective therapeutic interventions for prevention of diabetes onset and progression are urgently needed. Vaccination with autoantigens to promote selfantigen- specific tolerance represents the most specific and safest means of preventing autoimmune diseases. Autoantigens administered by the mucosal route, which is tolerogenic by nature, is the most effective way to prevent or treat autoimmune diseases. However, the two major drawbacks of oral vaccination with autoantigens are the large quantities required to induce significant tolerance, presumably because the protein is partially degraded in the stomach, and the high cost of producing recombinant autoantigens using the conventional cell culture-based platforms. The expression of autoantigens in plants and the oral delivery of the plant tissue expressing the target antigen offer a potential solution for these two drawbacks. The goal of this review is to outline novel diabetes vaccine strategies based on -cell autoantigens with a focus on the advantages and potential Continue reading >>

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On the basis of a postulated infectious mechanism for the development of type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus, several studies have investigated the possibility of an association with vaccination. To date support has not been obtained for associations between type 1 diabetes mellitus and BCG, MMR, pertussis or Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. Postulated autoimmune mechanism for suggested link with vaccines Several researchers have postulated that type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus may develop secondary to an abnormal immune response to some viral infections. The possibility that childhood vaccination may also be associated either negatively or positively has also been considered. The steady increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children in several countries 1,2 has lent some credence to the possibility of a positive association. Studies in diabetic mice have found that Bacille Calmette-Gurin (BCG) vaccine has interrupted the development of diabetes mellitus. 3 However, most studies in humans published to date have not supported the postulated negative association with BCG vaccine or the positive association with other vaccines, but rather have found evidence for no association. No difference in rate of BCG vaccination between cases and controls Classen and Classen 4 studied the incidence of diabetes and the immunisation schedule in a number of developed countries and found that the countries with the lowest rates of diabetes were those with pertussis vaccine in the vaccination programme and in which infants received BCG vaccine before 2 months of age. However, 2 of the areas where neither pertussis nor BCG were part of the schedule had among the lowes Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood vaccines can cause diabetes and metabolic syndrome, research confirms Sunday, October 13, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer (NaturalNews) Comprehensive research compiled by expert immunologist Dr. J. "Bart" Classen has uncovered the disturbing fact that childhood vaccines are a common cause of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as the barrage of chronic illness symptoms typically associated with metabolic syndrome. Because they tend to overstimulate the immune system, vaccines have the potential to either inhibit the proper production of insulin, resulting in the development of type 1 diabetes, or spur the production of too much insulin, resulting in the development of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, as many people are already aware, is an autoimmune condition whereby the body attacks the pancreas and destroys the pancreatic cells responsible for producing insulin, a detrimental situation in which the body must be artificially injected with insulin. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is actually a chronic inflammatory condition marked by the pancreas producing too much insulin, and the body being unable to properly absorb it. According to Dr. Classen, most of the people who develop type 2 diabetes, although often overweight or obese, are not typically responsible for triggering the onset of this potentially deadly condition. Particularly in children, there is clearly another factor involved in the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and one that available science on the subject seems to confirm is related to childhood vaccines. "Not only are vaccines causing an epidemic of autoimmunity including type 1 diabetes, but they are causing an epidemic of metabolic syndrome as the immune system acts to suppress the inflammation and autoimmun Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes By Harris Coulter, Ph.d

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes By Harris Coulter, Ph.d

Childhood Vaccinations and Juvenile-Onset (Type-1)Diabetes President, Center for Empirical Medicine Testimony before the Congress of the UnitedStates, House of Representatives, Committee on Appropriations, subcommittee on Labor,Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies April 16, 1997 Diabetes, both juvenile-onset (Type I) and adult-onset (Type II), is a major healthproblem in the United States, and the number of diabetics is increasing every year. In1947, there were an estimated 600,000 cases of diabetes in the United States.(1) Thirty years later, in 1976, Henry Bearn wrote: It is perhaps not generally appreciatedthat in the United States diabetes, or at least the recognition of the disease, hasincreased about 300 percent over the last fifteen years. It is the second leading cause ofblindness, and the third cause of death. In 1950 there were 1.2 million diabetics in theUnited States; the estimation now is that there are over 10 million, yet the populationhas increased by only 50 percent.(2) Today the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.'s quarterly Statistical Bulletin estimatesthat diabetics make up 5 percent of the US population, or 13 million persons.(3) Of these,85-90 percent are adult onset, which is more or less controlled by diet and exercise; theother 10-15 percent require daily injections of insulin. So, while the US population hasapproximately doubled since the 1940's, the number of diabetics has risen more than 20times. While the statistical data, like any medical statistics, are based to some degreeon estimates, there has clearly been a huge increase in the number of diabetics in theUnited States. Billions Spent to Help Diabetics - Furthermore, diabetics consumer about 15percent of all health care costs, again according to Metropolitan Life. Pe Continue reading >>

Vaccinations And Diabetes

Vaccinations And Diabetes

Childhood Vaccines Not Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Risk March 31, 2004 -- The largest study to date on the proposed link between childhood vaccination and type 1 diabetes suggests that common vaccines do not increase the risk of the disease. The Danish study followed nearly 750,000 children, comparing the risk of developing type 1 diabetes between vaccinated and non-vaccinated children, and found no evidence of an association between common vaccines and the disease. "Overall, there were no more cases of diabetes among the vaccinated children than in the unvaccinated children," says researcher Anders Hviid, of Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. The findings appear in the April 1 issue of TheNew England Journal of Medicine. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile or insulin -dependent diabetes ) occurs when insulin -producing cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system. The exact cause of the disease is unknown, but a combination of genetic and environmental factors is thought to influence the risk of developing the condition. Diabetes and Vaccination Linked by Timing Alone Researchers say the fact that type 1 diabetes cases have risen by 3% each year in developed countries over the last 50 years has fueled speculation that various environmental factors, such as diet, lifestyle, and exposure to infectious agents, early in life might play an important role in the development of the disease. In addition, the rising incidence of type 1 diabetes in recent years has coincided with the introduction of a growing number of childhood vaccines. Current guidelines for infant vaccination call for up to 18 injections that protect against 12 different infectious diseases by the time children reach 2 years of age. "There has been this temporal associat Continue reading >>

Vaccine Information For Adults

Vaccine Information For Adults

Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date. Why Vaccines are Important for You Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes. Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels. People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Vaccines You Need There may be other vaccines recommended for you based on your lifestyle, travel habits, and other factors. Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you. Getting Vaccinated You regularly see your provider for diabetes care, and that is a great place to start! If yo Continue reading >>

Relationship Of Measles, Mumps, And Rubella And Type 1 Diabetes

Relationship Of Measles, Mumps, And Rubella And Type 1 Diabetes

Relationship of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella and Type 1 Diabetes Several studies have shown that type 1 diabetes in childhood often coincides with an increase in viral infections such as measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). In a study, Italian researchers aimed to confirm these findings in the Pavia district of Italy. The research team looked at the link between any new cases of type 1 diabetes as well as new cases of measles, mumps, and rubella between 1996 and 2001. Researchers analyzed data of children who were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Children who participated in this study were between 0 and 14 years old, and they were enrolled in the Italian Insulin-dependent Diabetes Registry (RIDI) during those same years. The results of their study were published online in early December 2011in the article Type 1 diabetes and measles, mumps and rubella childhood infections within the Italian Insulin-dependent Diabetes Registry. The article will appear soon in Diabetic Medicine. The measles, mumps, and rubella infection rates were calculated using the estimated population at risk as the denominator. This was represented by the number of study participants who did not have the MMR vaccination. Spearmans rank correlation was used to examine the connection between type 1 diabetes incidence and measles, mumps, and rubella. At first, the analysis of the data from all of the registries did not show any statistical significance between age-standardized type 1 diabetes incidence and estimated rates of MMR. But when researchers excluded the data from the Sardinia Registry, they found a significant link between type 1 diabetes incidence and mumps (p=0.034) as well as rubella (p=0.014). However, there was no statistical significance between incidence of measles and diabetes rate Continue reading >>

Current Research Into Cures For Type-1 Diabetes

Current Research Into Cures For Type-1 Diabetes

Current Research into Cures for Type-1 Diabetes News and updates on potential cures for type-1 diabetes, that are in human (or clinical) trials. Results from the Studies and References (continued) [r6] The Swedish childhood diabetes study (1991) When vaccinations were considered as possible risk factors for diabetes, a significant decrease in relative risk estimated as odds ratio (OR) was noted for measles vaccination (OR=0.69; 95% confidence limits 0.480.98). For vaccination against tuberculosis, smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough, rubella and mumps no significant effect on OR for diabetes was found. ... In conclusion, a protective effect of measles vaccination for Type 1 diabetes in childhood is indicated [r7] No major association of breast-feeding, vaccinations, and childhood viral diseases with early islet autoimmunity in the German BABYDIAB Study.(2000) RESULTS: In offspring from mothers with type 1 diabetes, duration of exclusive and total breast-feeding did not differ between islet antibody-positive and -negative children, regardless of HLA genotype, and breast-feeding of 3 months or longer was not associated with protection from antibody development or diabetes onset. In offspring from diabetic fathers, non-statistically significant reductions in exclusive and total breast-feeding times were observed in the antibody-positive cohort. Neither type nor quantity of vaccinations (including Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine; haemophilus influenzae vaccine; diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine; tick-born encephalitis vaccine; or measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine) were associated with the development of islet antibodies and diabetes. Measles, mumps, and rubella were not reported in children with islet antibodies or diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed no evide Continue reading >>

Vaccines And Diabetes

Vaccines And Diabetes

The relationship between vaccines and diabetes has been the subject of several excellent studies. The hypothesis that the timing of vaccines either causes or prevents diabetes was tested in 21,421 children who received the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine between 1988 and 1990 in the United States. These children were followed for 10 years after receiving the Hib vaccine. The risk of diabetes was indistinguishable from a group of 22,557 children who did not receive the Hib vaccine. Another excellent study evaluating the relationship between vaccines and diabetes was performed using data from the Vaccine Safety DataLink. Four large health management organizations (HMOs) were used to identify children with diabetes born between 1988 and 1997. All four HMOs maintained registries of children with diabetes and cases were confirmed by means of medical records. Investigators compared 252 cases of diabetes with 768 matched controls. Children who received whole-cell pertussis , MMR , Hib , hepatitis B or varicella vaccines were not at greater risk for diabetes than children who did not receive those vaccines. In accord with the Vaccine Safety DataLink study, several other well-controlled retrospective studies found that immunizations were not associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. In 2011 the Institute of Medicine reviewed studies of adverse events related to vaccines. One of the associations studied was whether the tetanus component of the DTaP vaccine caused type 1 diabetes. The committee concluded that development of type 1 diabetes was not caused by receipt of this vaccine. In another study, investigators followed individuals born in 1974 for 20 years who had or had not received the BCG vaccine and found that receipt of vaccine did no Continue reading >>

Study: Mmr Vaccine Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Study: Mmr Vaccine Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Study: MMR Vaccine Linked to Type 1 Diabetes Bioinformatics analysis links type 1 diabetes to vaccines contaminated with animalproteins and autoreactive T cells express skin homing receptors consistent withinjected vaccines as causal agent Autoimmunity against glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) has been associated with type 1 diabetes. GAD65 (65kDa) and GAD67 (67kDa, to a lesser extent) are involved in type 1 diabetes. Following an anecdotal report of type 1 diabetes diagnosis a few weeks after measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine administration, MMR vaccine contents were examined. Major proteins in the vaccine apart from the measles, mumps and rubella live viruses were chicken embryo cell culture proteins. GAD65 and GAD67 are expressed during chicken embryogenesis. GAD65 Gallus gallus (chicken) protein sequence was obtained from Uniprot. BLASTP was used to determine homology to human GAD65. GAD65 protein comparison between human and chicken reveals 95% sequence homology as shown below. The results above provide strong evidence that chicken embryo cell culture proteins in the MMR vaccine can cause the development of antibodies against chicken GAD65 which cross-react with human GAD65 protein to cause type 1 diabetes. This is very similar to the Pandemrix vaccine causing narcolepsy. Vaccine design and safety processes have fundamental problems that need to be immediately addressedto avoid such devastating consequences. Comment on this article at VaccineImpact.com. Big Pharma and government health authorities are trying to pass laws mandating vaccines for all children, and even adults. Show your opposition to forced vaccinations and support the cause of Vaccine Impact , part of the Health Impact News network . Leaving a lucrative career as a nephrologist (kidney doctor), D Continue reading >>

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

Text Size: In the fall of 1997, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed that the number of Americans living with diabetes has skyrocketed in the past 40 years with a record sixfold increase in this chronic disease since 1958. It is estimated that nearly 16 million Americans are suffering with diabetes and 5 million more may have it but not know it. Over the past four decades, intensive national mass vaccination campaigns have dramatically increased vaccination rates among American children who now are getting 34 doses of 10 different viral and bacterial vaccines before they enter kindergarten. Recent published data in the medical literature suggest increasing numbers of childhood vaccines may be playing a role in the big jump in the number of cases of juvenile diabetes. What is diabetes? The most frequent kind of diabetes is diabetes mellitus, a chronic degenerative disease caused when the pancreas either fails to produce a protein hormone called insulin or the body's cells are resistant to the action of insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot process and use glucose, a blood sugar which is a chief source of energy for living organisms and is found in certain foods like fruit. If the body's cells have become resistant to insulin, glucose cannot be moved from the blood to cells in order to be transformed into energy. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I, called insulin-dependent juvenile diabetes, and Type II, called adult-onset diabetes. Type I Diabetes - Type I diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), occurs mostly in children and young adults. Five to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes are Type I diabetics. In Type I diabetes, the body cannot produce insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the bloodstream and be se Continue reading >>

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