diabetestalk.net

Mini Pill And Insulin Resistance

Diabetes & Birth Control

Diabetes & Birth Control

Diabetes & birth control at a glance Birth control pills, patches, implants, injections, and rings are generally considered to be safe forms of contraception for diabetic women, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). However, the estrogen in birth control pills can raise blood glucose levels, which increase a diabetic’s resistance to insulin and may require an adjustment in the insulin she receives. Because of the effects of estrogen, some physicians do not prescribe hormone-based birth control for some diabetic women. The ADA says that combination birth control pills containing synthetic estrogen and norgestinate are best for women with diabetes. The effect of birth control on diabetes The inconclusive results of various research studies have led to controversy over the potential harmful effect of birth control pills for diabetic women. Some studies show that women who take birth control pills or other methods containing estrogen have higher blood glucose levels and blood cholesterol levels. Other studies show no differences in those levels between women taking birth control pills and women who don’t. Factors to consider Higher glucose levels resulting from the estrogen in birth control pills may require an increase in a diabetic woman’s need for insulin. Higher cholesterol levels increase the risk of heart attack, and diabetics already have an increased risk of heart attack. Some physicians recommend that diabetic women take birth control pills with the lowest dose of estrogen possible for effective contraception. Other birth control methods that employ estrogen, such as implants, patches, injections and vaginal rings, can also affect a woman’s diabetes. Studies indicate that diabetic women who take birth control pills for more than two years ma Continue reading >>

Can Birth Control Pills Cause Insulin Resistance?

Can Birth Control Pills Cause Insulin Resistance?

Can birth control pills cause insulin resistance? Can birth control pills cause insulin resistance? Taking oral contraceptives may promote insulin resistance, particular in those with diabetes or prediabetes. Oral contraceptives contain synthetic forms of the reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone. A 2014 review by Cortes, et al, concluded that taking these synthetic hormonesespecially estrogenappears to contribute to insulin resistance, making blood sugar control more difficult. If you feel that you've become more insulin resistant as a result of taking birth control pills, you may want to speak with your doctor about switching to a formulation that contains less estrogen. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, Content) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. dLife does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Reliance on any information provided by dLife, its employees and other contributors or visitors to this site is done solely at your own risk. Any information you submit to dLife or this Continue reading >>

Problem With The Pill

Problem With The Pill

The Pill causes blood clots, depression, weight gain, and cancer, but doctors continue to prescribe it. The medical community is locked in a paradigm.Because the Birth Control Pill is backed by a very strong pharmaceutical lobby, it remains entrenched as standard care, with hardly a voice of dissent.Despite the evidence, our regulatory Health agencies are simply not able to admit the obvious thing:The Pill is bad for women's health.It is the Elephant in the Room. During my twenty years clinical work in women's health, I have been continually mystified as to why women take the Pill so willingly.One explanation is the faulty information that they obtain from their doctors.But there is something deeper:Both women and their doctors have a basic misunderstanding of what the Pill is. Women and their doctors appear to believe that the oestrogen-type substances in the Pill are, in some fundamental way, the same as their own hormones.They assume that the chemicals in the tablet are no more than a simple replacement of what would normally be there anyway.In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. The ingredients in the Pill are not at all the same as naturally occurring hormones.They are foreign, toxic steroid drugs, and, despite what your doctor tells you, they cannot be used to balance your hormones. Pharmaceutical substances contained in the Pill are molecularly distinct from human hormones.Molecularly, the difference may be slight, but biologically, it is very significant.Hormone receptors are exquisitely sensitive. They respond differently to a differently shaped molecule.Some of the responses are vaguely similar, which is why the Pill can have some benefits, but some of the responses are very different, and many are downright sinister.For example, ethinylestradiol, Continue reading >>

Approach To The Patient: Contraception In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Approach To The Patient: Contraception In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive and metabolic disorder. Patients with PCOS present with clinical signs of androgen excess (ie, hirsutism and acne), menstrual irregularities, and infertility. Combined oral contraceptive (OC) pills are the first-line medical therapy for the long-term management of PCOS. Containing a combination of estrogen and progestin, OCs restore regular menses, improve androgen excess, and provide effective contraception and protection from endometrial cancer. The benefits of hormonal contraception outweigh the risks in the vast majority of women with PCOS. However, concerns have been raised about potential adverse cardiovascular and metabolic effects of OCs. Currently available evidence indicates an increased relative risk of venous thrombosis associated with OCs varying among different formulations. Arterial thrombosis risk attributable to OCs does not appear to be significantly increased in young nonsmoking women. OC use might be associated with increased risk of diabetes in morbidly obese women with PCOS with severe insulin resistance. A tailored clinical approach to oral contraception in women with PCOS requires individualized risk stratification and management by determination of each PCOS patient's personal cardiometabolic risk profile at baseline and during follow-up. Before prescribing an OC, clinicians should document individual risk factors including age, smoking, obesity, any degree of glucose intolerance including prediabetes and diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, thrombophilia, and personal or family history of a venous thromboembolic event. A 20-year-old woman presented with a complaint of having too much facial and body hair that she found bothersome and embarrassing. She noted hair growth around puberty t Continue reading >>

How The Pill Can Seriously Affect A Womans Health

How The Pill Can Seriously Affect A Womans Health

My functional MD and ND friends always say that the pill is the worse thing medicine invented for women. I could relate, to some degree, to this strong statement based on my own experience of being on the pill for a short period until I realized how sick it made me feel. But, writing this article and investing several hours to further research on this topic, Ive realized that this statement is far from exaggerated. When you finish reading this article, you will know that the pill is simply a robber of womens health. Since the 60s, the contraceptive pill has promised us greater control over our bodies and fertility, but this freedom may come at an enormous cost to a womans health. Unfortunately, several generations of women have been used as guinea pigs, and many of the dangers of birth control pills are only just coming to light. These birth control pill dangers are particularly concerning, given that an estimated 100 million+ women worldwide are currently using oral contraceptives yet are largely unaware that it can pose many health risks because it upsets natural hormone balance. And the harmful effects of birth control pills go beyond whether birth control pills and strokes or cancer. Also concerning is the pills increasing use to treat issues like acne or Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, without addressing the cause of these problems (such as food intolerances, high sugar levels, lack of sleep and stress). Each month your levels of progesterone and estrogen fluctuate at different times of your cycle. In a nutshell, your estrogen peaks right before ovulation and after that your estrogen drops while your progesterone peaks to ready the lining of the uterus for pregnancy. Birth Control Pills disrupt your bodys normal hormone production with synthetic versions of estrogen Continue reading >>

Best Birth Control For Pcos: 3 Options

Best Birth Control For Pcos: 3 Options

The vaginal ring costs as much as the skin patch, or $30 to $35 for a months supply. The ring is also covered by most insurance plans. Will any form of hormonal birth control work? Combination birth control whether in the form of a pill, ring, or patch is the most popular and recommended form of treatment for PCOS. If youre unable to take the combination pill or use other combination methods, your doctor may recommend the progestin-only pill. There are also other alternatives, including: Progesterone therapy: You can take progesterone for 10 to 14 days every one to two months. This treatment doesnt prevent pregnancy or improve androgen levels, but it can help manage your symptoms. Progestin-containing intrauterine device (IUD): IUDs that contain progestin can help ease the symptoms of PCOS in the same way combination or progestin-only pills do. Metformin: This medication for type 2 diabetes, brand name Glucophage , lowers insulin and androgen levels and improves insulin resistance. Insulin resistance commonly occurs with PCOS, and metformin might be used to treat this. It isnt approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat PCOS specifically, so this is considered off-label use. But research has shown that it may help restart ovulation and lead to regular periods. Off-label drug use means that a drug thats been approved by the FDA for one purpose is used for a different purpose that has not been approved. However, a doctor can still use the drug for that purpose. This is because the FDA regulates the testing and approval of drugs, but not how doctors use drugs to treat their patients. So, your doctor can prescribe a drug however they think is best for your care. Using birth control to protect against pregnancy Although PCOS is the leading cause of infertilit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Pill

Diabetes And The Pill

This is the 50th anniversary of the birth control pill; a tiny thing that has revolutionized society. Taking the pill does tend to increase blood glucose levels so it might be useful to consider the ramifications of using this pregnancy avoidance tool while managing one’s diabetes. The pill essentially consists of some combination of the hormones estrogen and progesterone. These hormones provide important instructions to reproductive tissues in a carefully timed fashion. Birth control pills create a hormonal state that makes the body think it is already pregnant and blocks any new eggs developing. Thus actual pregnancy is avoided. Probably the first thing you have focused on is this increase in blood glucose. How much are we talking about? Actually – not much. The amount of increase in non-diabetic women is considered by the American Diabetes Association not enough to be concerned about. For women with diabetes, however, the debate is spirited. One school of thought is that any increase in blood sugar is an increase in risk and should be concerning. The other school of thought, of course, is that the benefits of avoiding an unwanted pregnancy outweigh the minimal risk. We have known for quite some time that birth control pills decrease insulin sensitivity and this is caused entirely by progesterone. The mechanism appears to be complicated in that progesterone seems to act at multiple levels in the insulin signaling pathway. Interestingly, the progesterone receptor, upon binding progesterone, travels to the nucleus of the cell and regulates the expression of numerous genes. Several of these genes target the insulin signaling pathway in a variety of ways suggesting that this is a very deliberate piece of evolutionary integration. About a decade ago, a progesterone onl Continue reading >>

Contraceptive Pill And Diabetes

Contraceptive Pill And Diabetes

Tweet As a woman who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, there should be no reason why you cannot take birth control pills in safety. You should always consult with your doctor before taking the pill. Birth control pills Birth control pills generally fall into two types, although there at present 23 different brands of contraceptive pill on the UK market. Oestrogen and progestin The first contains the hormones oestrogen and progestin, and the second contains progestin alone. Combination pills, those that contain oestrogen and progestin, very rarely cause shifts in blood glucose levels and the ways in which the body controls them. Progesterone Pills which contain only progesterone don’t cause changes in blood glucose control. Further contraceptive methods such as injections and implants are also considered fairly safe for diabetics to use. Loss of control Many women experience a slight loss of control in blood sugars initially when they start taking the pill, but this can usually be rectified by a slight change in treatment regime. Contraceptive pill The contraceptive pill may indirectly complicate diabetes, however. Some of the side-effects of the pill may lead to increased risk of diabetes complications. High blood pressure, for instance, could increase your chance of contracting eye or kidney problems for diabetes. Diabetics who also smoke are advised to seek alternative forms of contraception. Some medical thinking implies that the oestrogen present in birth control pills can increase glucose levels whilst simultaneously decreasing bodily insulin response. Progestin present in birth control pills could also possibly lead to insulin overproduction. Some medical practitioners advise that taking the birth control pill should be limited only to those women who are younger t Continue reading >>

The Pill And Pcos: Three Reasons Why It's Not Effective

The Pill And Pcos: Three Reasons Why It's Not Effective

Three Reasons Why The Pill Is Not An Effective Treatment For PCOS Have you been prescribed the pill or another form of hormonal contraception as a treatment for PCOS, either to reduce testosterone or to regulate your period? I was. I obediently listened to the advice given and went along with it. However, it was only after much research that I found out that it was actually making my PCOS worse, not better. There is no doubt that hormonal birth control methods, such as the pill, the Mirena IUD, and the depo injection (hereafter also referred to as the pill) are convenient methods of birth control. However, the pill can also cause long term changes to your fertility hormones and increase insulin resistance. Here are three reasons why the pill is not an effective treatment for PCOS: 1. The Pill Causes Insulin Resistance, Which Worsens PCOS Symptoms Unbeknownst to most women, the pill can actually cause insulin resistance a huge contributory factor in worsening PCOS symptoms. Studies have shown that the pill causes a 30-40% reduction in insulin sensitivity and also stops exercise from improving insulin sensitivity . Insulin resistance is also known as prediabetes. High insulin levels stimulate the ovaries to overproduce testosterone . These higher levels of testosterone cause PCOS. High insulin levels also directly cause symptoms associated with PCOS, such as hirsutism . Insulin gets into the hair follicles on the face, back, and chest, causing abnormal facial hair growth. The pill also causes a chronic increase in Luteinizing Hormone (LH) , which stops ovulation, thereby reducing your likelihood of getting pregnant. LH and another hormone called Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) are the little known hormones that control ovulation. If LH is too high then the ratio of LH Continue reading >>

Oral Contraceptives, Insulin Resistance And Cardiovascular Risk Profile In Pre-menopausal Women

Oral Contraceptives, Insulin Resistance And Cardiovascular Risk Profile In Pre-menopausal Women

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Oral Contraceptives, Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Risk Profile in Pre-Menopausal Women The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01475513 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Birth control pills are the most commonly used method of birth control. The purpose of this research study is to examine whether birth control pills change heart disease risk and how the body handles blood sugar when given to different women. Insulin Sensitivity Cardiovascular Risk Perimenopausal Disorder The oral contraceptive pill is the most commonly used birth control method. It is debated whether the birth control pill affects how the body handles insulin and sugar, or whether the pill changes heart disease risk. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether certain factors, such as how the body processes hormones, and demographic factors (e.g. body weight and race), influence how the pill affects the handling of insulin and sugar, and heart health. Oral Contraceptives, Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Risk Profile in Pre-Menopausal Women Ethinyl estradiol 35 mcg and norgestimate 0.25 mg (oral) will be taken as one tablet daily for 21 days per month followed by a 7-day pill-free period per cycle. Duration of the study is for 6 cycles of this birth control pill. Ethinyl e Continue reading >>

Best Birth Control Pills For Pcos

Best Birth Control Pills For Pcos

A widely used treatment for PCOS is combination birth control . The symptoms of PCOS vary from woman-to-woman. Birth control pills help regulate a woman's menstrual period, making it more predictable. Hormonal birth control pills are safe but they may present some risks. mood changes, problems concentrating, and fatigue irregular periods due to delayed or no ovulation Symptoms vary and may be mild or so severe that they disrupt a woman's life. With treatment, the symptoms can be managed and may disappear. Hormonal birth control is considered to be combination birth control when it contains two hormones. These hormones are usually estrogen, and a synthetic form of progesterone called progestin. These combination pills can also regulate some hormonal imbalances, by increasing a woman's estrogen levels and decreasing the amount of testosterone her body produces. Due to combination birth control pills containing two hormones that can adjust hormone issues, they are the preferred choice for many prescribing doctors. However, not all women can safely take combination pills. Hormonal birth control pills are safe, but they do present some risks including : A greater risk of diabetes: This is a consideration for women with PCOS who are already at risk for diabetes. A risk of cardiovascular issues: Including dangerous blood clots in the legs. Women with PCOS who are obese may have an elevated risk. If they smoke, the risk rises. Weight gain: Some evidence suggests that birth control pills can cause weight gain, but other studies disagree. Women who are already obese may be reluctant to take birth control pills. Weight gain can make the symptoms of PCOS worse. For some women, a pill known as the minipill may be a better choice. Minipills contain just one hormone, progestin. They Continue reading >>

New Risks Of Birth Control Pills For Pcos - Pcos Nutrition Center

New Risks Of Birth Control Pills For Pcos - Pcos Nutrition Center

New Risks of Birth Control Pills for PCOS By Angela on November 1, 2017 under PCOS Treatment Birth control pills have long been demonstrated as a first-line treatment option for women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) who suffer from painful or irregular or absent periods.Some women may take Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) to help lower androgen levels and improve unwanted dermatological symptoms. Despite its benefits, OCPs have been associated with adverse health effects in women, as early as the teenage years . Some professions question if birth control pills are just a Band-Aid and dont address the root cause of the syndrome. Women who go off OCPs still find that their period is irregular or absent, sending many to fertility clinics for help. If you are a woman with PCOS or are a parent of a young girl with PCOS, you may be asking if the pill is really a good idea or if there are other options to consider. This article reviews the risks and benefits of birth control pills for women with PCOS and alternative treatments. There are several benefits for women with PCOS to take birth control pills. A big benefit is the ability of OCPs to reduce high testosterone levels and improve the balance of reproductive hormones. Women with PCOS who take OCPs see their periods regulate and may even see a reduction in unwanted dematological symptoms like acne and hair growth. Regular menstural cycles can also reduce the risk for developing endometrial hyperplasia and ovarian cancer, by preventing the uterine lining from becoming too thick. Despite the benefits, recent studies indicates that birth control pills should be used with caution, especially in adolescents with PCOS. The reason? OCPs have been found to increase levels of LDL, Triglyceride, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Hormonal Contraceptives On Glycemic Regulation

The Effects Of Hormonal Contraceptives On Glycemic Regulation

The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation 1Departamento de Ciencias Qumicas y Biolgicas, Universidad Bernardo O'Higgins, Santiago, Chile 2Reproductive Health Research Institute, Santiago, Chile 3Liceo Experimental Manuel de Salas, Universidad de Chile, uoa, Chile 4Programa de Magster en Educacin en Salud y Bienestar Humano, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educacin, Santiago, uoa, Chile 1Departamento de Ciencias Qumicas y Biolgicas, Universidad Bernardo O'Higgins, Santiago, Chile 2Reproductive Health Research Institute, Santiago, Chile 3Liceo Experimental Manuel de Salas, Universidad de Chile, uoa, Chile 4Programa de Magster en Educacin en Salud y Bienestar Humano, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educacin, Santiago, uoa, Chile Copyright Catholic Medical Association 2014 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A number of side effects have been linked to the use of hormonal contraceptives, among others, alterations in glucose levels. Hence, the objective of this mini-review is to show the main effects of hormonal contraceptive intake on glycemic regulation. First, the most relevant studies on this topic are described, then the mechanisms that might be accountable for this glycemic regulation impairment as exerted by hormonal contraceptives are discussed. Finally, we briefly discuss the ethical responsibility of health professionals to inform about the potential risks on glycemic homeostasis regarding hormonal contraceptive intake. Keywords: Glycemic homeostasis, Hormonal contraception, Insulin resistance, Impaired glucose tolerance Since the early 1950s, when Mexican chemist Luis. E. Miramontes and co-researchers carried out the synthesis of norethisterone (norethindrone), the first oral contraceptive ( Miramontes Continue reading >>

Could Use Of The Pill Be Linked To Insulin Resistance?

Could Use Of The Pill Be Linked To Insulin Resistance?

Could use of the pill be linked to insulin resistance? by Elizabeth Kissling | Oct 3, 2012 | Birth Control , Coming off the pill , Health Care , New Research | 9 comments Adapted from a photo by anna marie-grace // CC 2.0 The pill is one of the most intensely studied drugs in history, and believed to be among the safest safer than aspirin, as an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health noted twenty years ago . Yet young women seem to be quitting in droves, for a variety of reasons: to restore feelings of psychological and emotional health, regain lost libido, relieve cardiovascular symptoms and disorders, or ease anxiety about these or other health issues. When women report these side effects of birth control pills, physicians often recommend they try another brand, but many of these side effects are common to hormonal birth control, especially oral contraceptives. A new study published this month in Human Reproduction suggests there may be yet another common side effect: Researchers in Finland found that oral contraceptives may worsen insulin sensitivity and are associated with increased levels of circulating inflammatory markers. The study was very small and ran only for a short time, so drawing conclusions is premature, but since the beginning of the year, Ive been following several online discussions of young women quitting the pill. Although I have yet to see development of Type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance cited as a reason to quit the pill, I have seen such a variety of health issues and medical problems described that this study caught my eye immediately. Current estimates indicate that12.6 million, or 10.8 percent, of all U.S. women ages 20 years or older have diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) . Could it be related to their birth control? Perh Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance, Secretion, And Metabolism In Users Of Oral Contraceptives.

Insulin Resistance, Secretion, And Metabolism In Users Of Oral Contraceptives.

1. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1992 Jan;74(1):64-70. Insulin resistance, secretion, and metabolism in users of oral contraceptives. Godsland IF(1), Walton C, Felton C, Proudler A, Patel A, Wynn V. (1)Wynn Institute for Metabolic Research, St. John's Wood, London, England. Studies of insulin employing the oral glucose tolerance test demonstrate markeddifferences between the effects of different oral contraceptives, but providelittle insight into the underlying disturbances. We investigated the metabolicbasis of these disturbances by computer modelling of iv glucose tolerance testglucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentration profiles. Insulin resistance,secretion, and metabolism were evaluated in 296 oral contraceptive users and 95nonusers. Four estrogen/progestin combinations, with similar estrogen butdiffering progestin contents, and 1 progestin-only formulation were studied.Effects on iv glucose tolerance test glucose, insulin, and C-peptideconcentrations varied according to progestin content, withlevonorgestrel-containing combinations having the greatest effect, followed bydesogestrel and norethindrone. However, these formulations increased insulinresistance to a similar extent. The progestin-only formulation did not affectinsulin resistance. Levonorgestrel combinations increased second phase pancreaticinsulin secretion by 60-90%, but did not affect the insulin half-life. Thedesogestrel combination increased the insulin half-life by 28%, but did notaffect insulin secretion. The effects of different combined oral contraceptiveson glucose tolerance test glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentration profiles appears to be due to a combination of estrogen-induced insulin resistance andprogestin-associated changes in insulin half-life.PIP: Results of intravenous glucose tole Continue reading >>

More in diabetes