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An Update On Medtronic’s Minimed 670g System

An Update On Medtronic’s Minimed 670g System

This morning, the Medtronic Diabetes Group held a conference call for a small group of diabetes writers to give an update on its new MiniMed 670G system, otherwise known as the world’s first hybrid closed loop system. Louis Dias, Chief Patient Officer of Medtronic Diabetes and Mike Hill, Vice President of Marketing for Medtronic’s Intensive Insulin Management Business were both on the call, as was Karrie Hawbaker, Senior Manager of Social Media. First, a recap on what the system is and what it does: The MiniMed 670G system is a combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor. What sets it apart from its predecessors—and, for that matter, every other pump on the market—is that it can actually give you insulin. This makes it a major step forward toward the goal of a truly closed loop system. How does the 670G system work? Users must program their insulin-to-carb ratios, calibrate the system twice a day with a blood glucose reading from a finger stick, and give the system a “meal announcement” when they’re about to eat by entering the number of grams of carbohydrate that they intend to consume. The system then uses the grams of carbohydrate users have entered and their insulin-to-carb ratio to estimate an initial bolus to cover the meal. In the hours that follow, the system makes tiny tweaks to basal rates in order to get blood sugar levels as close as possible to 120 mg/dL. This means that you don’t need to enter correction boluses and that there’s no longer such thing as dual wave or square boluses—the pump is taking care of it for you. How’s it different from the most recent MiniMed pump? Medtronic Diabetes’s current top-of-the-line pump is the MiniMed 630G system with Enlite Sensor. The 530G uses something called SmartGuard™ te Continue reading >>

670g And Me: Insights And Incites On Medtronic’s Latest System

670g And Me: Insights And Incites On Medtronic’s Latest System

What’s the purpose of a diabetes management device? Is it to lower A1c? Prevent hypoglycemia? Spend more time in-range? Some combination of all three? Or perhaps we have to look beyond blood sugar control. After all, quality of life has to count for something. Does it make living with diabetes safer and easier? My Detailed Review of The MiniMed 670G from Medtronic The MiniMed 670G from Medtronic is an insulin pump coupled with a glucose sensor. It uses a computer program (called an “algorithm”) to automate certain aspects of insulin delivery. I decided to try 670G partially out of professional interest (everybody and their great aunt has been asking for my opinion on the system), and partially out of personal interest, as my blood glucose control hasn’t been the greatest the past couple of years. Let me start out by saying this: Since I started using 670G, my overall blood glucose control is better. I have to keep reminding myself of this non-consequential fact, because every day I find things about this system that I don’t particularly like. In my opinion, the pump itself leaves a lot to be desired. There are so many features and so many menus and so many safety/confirmation steps that my button thumb is starting to form a blister. The color screen is nice, but not large enough to display everything it needs to display. And the freakin’ clip is upside down. The reservoir connector pokes me in the gut every time I bend over, and I have to unclip it to see the screen and programming menus in the proper orientation. The “hybrid closed loop” part of the system (what I prefer to call the “semi-automatic feature”) is what makes 670G special. It functions by making adjustments to the BASAL insulin based on data received from the linked glucose sensor. Sinc Continue reading >>

Hybrid Closed Loop System.

Hybrid Closed Loop System.

NEW! The Suspend before low§ option avoids lows and rebound highs proactively by automatically stopping insulin 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then automatically restarts insulin when your levels recover, all without bothersome alerts. NEW! The Auto Mode‡ option automatically adjusts your basal insulin delivery every 5 minutes based on your sugar levels to keep you in target range, all day and night. Watch Video View Brochure Get Started NEW! Guardian® Sensor 3 continuous glucose monitoring sensor. Introducing the most accurate sensor from Medtronic, now with up to 7 day wear and easy insertion. It is the FIRST and ONLY continuous glucose monitoring sensor FDA approved and trusted to control insulin dosing. Exclusive CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 meter1 Get easy and accurate CGM calibration, insulin dosing and remote bolusing with our exclusive meter. “This device will mean peace of mind, in knowing a person will be in normal blood sugar range a great majority of the time,” “It’s a medical device with the potential to change the lives of more than 1 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes.” KEEP YOUR GLUCOSE IN RANGE SMARTGUARD® HCL TECHNOLOGY. Quick and easy access to your glucose and insulin information, all from the home screen. Bright color screen for easy readability - day or night. Waterproof - so you can enjoy underwater activities. Quick and easy bolus from your meter. Fewer shots than multiple daily injections. The only sensor FDA approved and trusted to control insulin dosing. Easy to insert. Know at all times where your glucose levels are trending. Click here for assistance if your insurance does not currently cover the MiniMed 670G system. * Mean Absolute Relative Difference. ** 3-4 calibrations per day required. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Unveils Diabetes Partnerships With Samsung, Glooko

Medtronic Unveils Diabetes Partnerships With Samsung, Glooko

Medtronic Unveils Diabetes Partnerships With Samsung, Glooko Medtronic's MiniMed 530G device. Photo provided by Medtronic. Bolstering its bid to become a more comprehensive diabetes solutions company, Medtronic has announced new partnerships with electronics giant Samsung and with diabetes data management provider Glooko. The deals are intended to provide diabetics and their care teams with secure, seamless, and timely access to integrated diabetes data. Medtronic and Samsung have agreed to co-develop Android smartphone apps that pull data from Medtronic's insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices. The apps provide diabetics with convenient access to their blood glucose data through Samsung mobile phones and wearable devices. Such an integrated system not only provides convenience, it can help prevent dangerous hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic clinical events. "By addressing more of the social and emotional aspects of living with diabetes and improving lifestyle fit, we believe that more people worldwide will be able to experience better diabetes control that today's advanced therapies provide," said Alejandro Galindo, vice president and general manager of the Intensive Insulin Management business at Medtronic, in a press release . "Medtronic aims to transform diabetes by providing world-class integrated care, enabled by leading technologies, big data, and informatics. Our partnership with Samsung is a key step in providing convenient and discreet access to diabetes data, so together we can provide people with diabetes greater freedom and better health. The Android apps will be designed to work with Medtronic's MiniMed Connect device. The pocket-sized device which just gained FDA approval transmits data from Medtronic's MiniMed 530G and Revel insulin Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump

Fda Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump

FDA Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump The device, known as the MiniMed 670G, is geared toward patients with Type 1 diabetes The Food and Drug Administration has approved an insulin pump by Medtronic that automatically manages glucose levels within a target range. Photo: Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg News The Food and Drug Administration approved for sale a significant advance toward a so-called artificial pancreas for Type 1 diabetes patients, a long-awaited insulin pump that aims to take some of the guesswork out of blood-sugar control. The product from Medtronic MDT -0.55% PLC, called the MiniMed 670G, combines two devices that attach to the outside of the bodya pump that delivers insulin through a tiny tube inserted under the skin, and a sensor that monitors blood glucose levels. The monitor tells the pump when to increase or decrease insulin flow to keep a persons blood sugar in a healthy range. The device isnt fully automatedusers must enter their planned carbohydrate intake at each mealtime, and adjust the sensor twice a day by carrying out finger-prick tests to measure blood sugar. But doctors and patients called the MiniMed an important breakthrough likely to improve glucose control, reduce complications and lessen the constant worry of controlling Type 1 diabetes. Existing diabetes pumps and monitors can automatically shut off insulin flow when a persons blood sugar levels veer toward being too low. But they cant automatically deliver insulin when a person has high blood sugar, doctors said. Weve been looking forward to a day like this for a long time, Derek Rapp, chief executive of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, or JDRF, said in an interview. Ultimately it means less concern, less burden, more freedom and less fear. Lori Laffel, a pediat Continue reading >>

Medtronic Announces New Minimed 630g Insulin Pump System

Medtronic Announces New Minimed 630g Insulin Pump System

Today, Medtronic Diabetes announced their newest addition to their insulin pump lineup, the MiniMed 630G. So, what’s the same and what’s changed? Here are a few key features that remained the same, a few great new changes, as well as additions for this generation in the Medtronic family. The Familiar Threshold Suspend, Renamed: The new pump will carry over some familiar features such as the Threshold Suspend, now renamed SmartGuard Technology, Suspend on Low, and will use the same Enlite sensor technology that is used with the 530G edition. Predictive Alerts: It also holds the same Predictive Alerts technology, alerting patients to potential highs or lows before they happen. Supplies: The supplies will be the same so you can still use your same sensors, as well as cartridges and tubing. The Changes Orientation: The pump is now portrait-oriented for easier, one-handed holding and programming rather than landscape. Color Options: Medtronic usually has at least 5 options for colors, however, in this new addition to the “family,” there will only be one option–black. The user will have the option for colorful skins, both as stickers or rubber bumpers, so they can customize their pumps how they would like. User-Friendly Menus: The menus have been updated to be more user-friendly to help new users easily navigate and use the pump. Alarms: Another change is with the alerts and alarms. They are now very customizable, with options for audible or vibration alerts, and the audible alerts can be chosen based on tone volume. MiniMed Connect: Currently, due to different radio frequencies built into the 630G, patients will not be able to take advantage of the MiniMed Connect system with the new 630G. This may be a possibility in the future with further advancements. (The Mini Continue reading >>

Medtronic Insulin Pump Lawsuit: Recall Of Quick-set Infusions Sets For Minimed Paradigm Insulin Pumps

Medtronic Insulin Pump Lawsuit: Recall Of Quick-set Infusions Sets For Minimed Paradigm Insulin Pumps

Medtronic Insulin Pump Lawsuit: Recall of Quick-Set Infusions Sets for MiniMed Paradigm Insulin Pumps Following the recall of Medtronic infusion pump Quick-set infusion sets issued Friday, the product liability lawyers at Saiontz & Kirk, P.A. are reviewing the potential for lawsuits on behalf of individuals who have suffered severe or fatal injuries as a result of the pumps delivering to much or too little insulin. >>FDA LINK (7/13/2009): Medtronic Paradigm Quick-Set Infusion Set Recall Late in the day Friday, Medtronic announced that approximately 60,000 Quick-set infusion sets used with the Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps could be defective and not work properly. Therefore, they recalled an estimated 3 million of the infusion sets with reference numbers MMT-396, MMT-397, MMT-398 and MMT-399 with lot numbers starting with an 8. The thin plastic tubes are used with the MiniMed Paradigm Medtronic insulin pump to deliver insulin to diabetes patients. The infusion set is typically replaced every three days. However, thousands of patients may have been sold infusion sets that may not allow the insulin pump to vent air pressure properly, potentially resulting in the device delivering too much or too little insulin. Over or under delivery of insulin from an insulin pump could have serious and catastrophic consequences for diabetes patients. Individuals have been told to stop using Lot 8 Quick-set infusion sets and Medtronic is offering to exchange all affected products at no charge. However, for individuals who have been hospitalized or suffered severe injuries as a result of incorrect delivery of insulin from their pump, the recalled units should be saved until after it is determined whether financial compensation may be available through a Medtronic insulin pump l Continue reading >>

Medtronic Sets $3.7b Deals

Medtronic Sets $3.7b Deals

NEW YORK (CNNfn) - Medtronic Inc. agreed Wednesday to buy two companies that make products to treat diabetes, MiniMed Inc. and Medical Research Group Inc., for a total of $3.7 billion in cash and stock. MiniMed (MNMD: up $2.81 to $46.81, Research, Estimates) owns a stake in Medical Research Group. Under the agreement, Medtronic (MDT: down $0.01 to $42.94, Research, Estimates) will pay $48 a share in cash for MiniMed and about $420 million in cash and stock for MRG, a closely held corporation. Medtronic shares ended up 45 cents at $42.95 Tuesday. MiniMed shares rose $2.87 early Wednesday to $46.87. The purchase is expected to close in late July or early August. "We have been contemplating these two acquisitions for some time. We're confident it represents a very strong strategic financial and cultural fit and a way for Medtronic to enter the high-growth diabetes treatment market," Medtronic CEO Art Collins told analysts during a conference call Wednesday. "This acquisition, simply put, is a very good one and makes a tremendous amount of sense." Medtronic makes stents, catheters and other devices to treat chronic heart conditions. Acquiring MiniMed and MRG gives Medtronic a stake in the rapidly growing diabetes treatment field. "(Diabetes) is a chronic disease and it fits right in to many of the therapies we provide today," Collins told CNNfn's Money Gang. About 2,500 Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each day, according to the American Diabetes Association. Treatment for the disease costs $98 billion a year in the United States. Kevin Kotler, an analyst with ABN Amro with an "add" or middle rating on the stock, said he liked the deal, which should restart Medtronic's growth rate. "MiniMed is the pre-eminent franchise in diabetes," Kotler told CNNfn. "I think it will Continue reading >>

The Minimed® 630g System

The Minimed® 630g System

* CGM uses a special sensor to measure sugar levels just below the skin known as interstitial fluid. These sensor glucose (SG) values are different from blood glucose (BG) measurements using a BG meter. Sensor glucose values should not be used to make treatment decisions. Patients should always do a BG fingerstick before they make treatment decisions. ** The Bolus Wizard calculator does not account for manual injections and could prompt you to deliver more insulin than needed. Too much insulin may cause hypoglycemia. Consult with your healthcare professional for how long you need to wait after a manual injection before you can rely on the active insulin calculation of your Bolus Wizard calculator. † When calibrating three to four times a day and predictive and low alerts are both turned on. There may be times falling within a range approved by the FDA when the system may falsely alert (i.e., alerts when blood glucose levels are above the alert setting). ‡ Enlite Sensor Performance Clinical Appendix. § The pump is protected against the effects of continuous immersion in up to 12 feet (3.6 meters) of water for up to 24 hours at a time at the time of manufacture. This is classified as IPX8 rating. See user guide for more details. ¶ Assumes four injections per day for 30 days and one infusion set change every three days. 1. Battelino T, Conget I, Olsen B, et al. The use and efficacy of continuous glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pump therapy: a randomized controlled trial. Diabetologia. 2012;55:3155–3162. 2. Doyle EA, Weinzimer SA, Steffen AT, Ahern JAH, Vincent M, Tamborlane WV. A randomized prospective trial comparing the efficacy of insulin pump therapy with multiple daily injections using insulin glargine. Diabetes Care. 2004;27(7):1554 Continue reading >>

Micra - Small Leadless Pacemaker | Medtronic

Micra - Small Leadless Pacemaker | Medtronic

Micra is the newest and smallest in our line of pacemakers, approved for use in the United States by the FDA in April 2016. Unlike most pacemakers that are placed in the patient's chest with leads running to the heart, Micra is implanted directly into the patients heart. Less invasive Micra is placed in the heart via a vein in the leg, thus no chest incision, scar, or bump that results from conventional pacemakers. Self-contained Micra is completely self-contained within the heart. It eliminates potential medical complicationsarising from a chest incision and from wires running from a conventional pacemaker into the heart. Small Micra is 93% smaller than conventional pacemakers, about the size of a large vitamin capsule.2 For most patients, the Micra design translates to fewer medical complications and fewer post-implant activity restrictions. The Micra design incorporates certain time-tested, valuable features from the Medtronic line of pacemakers: Permits you to safely undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a diagnostic tool doctors use to "see" inside the body Adjusts your heart rate automatically by sensing changes in your body related to your activity level and adjusting your heart rate accordingly Features an estimated battery longevity of 12 years Is Micra the right pacemaker for all patients? No. Micra is intended for patients who need a single chamber pacemaker(also known as a ventricular pacemaker, or VVIR).Talk to your doctor about the suitability, benefits, and risks of Micra for you. Your doctor will insert a "straw-like" catheter into a vein in your upper thigh and use the catheter to move Micra into the right ventricle of your heart. The catheter is then removed. Micra was designed, tested, and approved to be used safely with MRI scanners. You can und Continue reading >>

Understand More About Your Diabetes With Carelink® Reports.

Understand More About Your Diabetes With Carelink® Reports.

See the same reports as your doctor - CareLink Personal software is a free web based program that collects information directly from your diabetes management system. It allows you to generate reports that can be used during your doctor’s visits and to monitor your own progress. Get on the same page with your doctor. This report is designed to help you view your glucose management while on your MiniMed® 670G system. You can use this report with your healthcare professional to improve the duration of time spent in Auto Mode and determine what events caused some of your Auto Mode exits. Continue reading >>

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

I have used the Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System by Medtronic for the past 30 days. This review is my opinion of the pump, both positive and negative. I have used insulin pumps since I got my first Disetronic H-Tron V-100 in 1994. I got a Minimed 506 pump in 1998 and have been a fan of the Minimed/Medtronic pumps since. Until now. Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System The Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System comes with the pump, the CGM transmitter, and a Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose meter. The three devices work well together, once set up right. Medtronic also has an early access program. This lets you buy the Minimed 630G now, and upgrade to the upcoming Minimed 670G in spring of 2017. Receiving the Pump The 630G Pump comes in several boxes. The pump comes in an 8″x10″x2.25″ box that has the pump and several small items like clips, batteries, a manual, and a quick start guide. Another box of the same size has the Contour Next Link 2.4 meter. A second box arrived a few days later with the infusion sets and reservoirs, followed by another box a few days later with the CGM sensors. I got another box a week later with the CGM transmitter. In the past, the local Medtronic trainer would call me to train me on using the pump, with a request not to use it before the training. I normally ignore this request, since I have used Minimed pumps for so long. I do go to these trainings every once in a while, but I was never contact this time. Unusual, considering how new this version of the pump is. Even so, the pump was fairly easy to set up. I also got a pile of 8.5″x11″ manuals. One was a “previous pump users manual” and one was a “pump users manual’. There was a large manual in the box that had everything in it. And another “how to use the CGM” manual. Quite d Continue reading >>

The Newest Infusion Set: Medtronic/bd Minimed Pro-set With Flowsmart

The Newest Infusion Set: Medtronic/bd Minimed Pro-set With Flowsmart

By Adam Brown and Kelly Close Much less painful insertion, great needle retraction, and better disconnection We recently received an order of Medtronic/BD’s new MiniMed Pro-Set with FlowSmart technology, a little over a week after the initial limited launch began in the US (At this time, Medtronic is no longer accepting new participation in the limited launch; a full rollout is expected in early 2017, according to BD's recent company update). Talk of the new insulin pump infusion set has focused on the novel catheter (cannula), which includes two holes for insulin to flow through. BD’s data suggests the additional side hole helps reduce flow interruptions and silent occlusions (blockages). Hopefully that will translate into fewer unexplained highs! This test drive shares a less-talked-about and exciting part of the new set: what it’s like to insert and wear it. We’ve experienced meaningfully less pain relative to using current sets (very noticeable and welcome!); an excellent needle retraction after insertion; a terrific eight-position tubing connector and two squeeze tabs that make it far easier to disconnect and reconnect; and very secure adhesive. The MiniMed Pro-set is also the same price as current infusion sets – nice to see no extra charge for new innovation. Adam ran into some hiccups in his initial trial of the set, stemming from incorrect insertion and not reading the instructions. After a couple manual insertions (without using an inserter device), Adam experienced potential kinking and some high blood sugars. Using the Quick-serter device fixed the problem, as it brought more reliable 90-degree insertion – we would highly encourage using this! In talking with BD, Adam learned that he was inserting the set incorrectly: manually inserting MiniMed P Continue reading >>

First Impressions Of Medtronic's 670g Hybrid Closed Loop

First Impressions Of Medtronic's 670g Hybrid Closed Loop

Anyone touched by type 1 diabetes has to be excited about the FDA's recent approval of the first pre-Artificial Pancreas system, the Medtronic Minimed 670G. It's a milestone towards ever-more-sophisticated automated insulin delivery! Today, we're thrilled to have our correspondent Wil Dubois walk us through a hands-on initial review of this exciting new system. Test-Driving the Medronic 670G, 'Future of Diabetes Technology' Everything about Medtronic’s new Minimed 670G hybrid closed loop insulin pump is so different that it requires a substantial shift in mindset. Like one of those team-building exercises where you cross your hands and fall backwards, counting on your peers to catch you, the 670G requires us to let go of elements of diabetes control that for years have bordered on sacred. Why? Because this pump isn’t like anything we’ve ever seen before. In fact, it isn’t like any diabetes therapy we’ve ever seen before. What the 670G Does and Doesn't Do How many times have you started your day high, even though you went to bed on-target and haven’t eaten for 8, 10, or more hours? How would you like a pump that could see you were drifting up while you slept, and just automatically gave you more insulin to fix the problem? Or a pump that could see that you are drifting down during a hard day’s work and shut off the flow of insulin to prevent a low? That’s the promise of the 670G. It’s designed to track changes in your blood sugar via a CGM, and keep you in target by automatically delivering “micro boluses” or withholding insulin—replacing a traditional fixed basal rate. All 670G users need to do is count carbs and enter them into the pump when they are going to eat. So, how well does it live up to its promise? Well… OK, first things first. The p Continue reading >>

Minimed Paradigm

Minimed Paradigm

The Medtronic Minimed Paradigm 515 pump (RF receiver), Silhouette infusion set, and UltraLink blood sugar meter (RF transmitter). MiniMed Paradigm is a series of insulin pumps manufactured by Medtronic for patients with diabetes mellitus. The pump operates with a single AAA battery and uses a piston-plunger pump to infuse a programmed amount of insulin into the patient through a length of tubing. The Paradigm uses a one-way wireless radio frequency link to receive blood sugar measurements from select glucose meters. The Paradigm RT (Real Time) series adds the ability to receive data from a mated continuous blood-glucose monitor. Although the pump can use these measurements to assist in calculating a dose of insulin, no actual change in insulin delivery occurs without manual user-intervention. [1][2] In the United States, the device is regulated by a branch of the Food and Drug Administration.[3] Description[edit] Pump and infusion set (catheter) placement. Insulin basal bolus profile. Insulin pumps are drug delivery devices used to treat patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The Minimed Paradigm REAL-Time and Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system, which received FDA clearance in 2006,[4] uses tubing and a reservoir with rapid-acting insulin. This "infusion set" is patient-connected via a catheter to the abdomen region. The infusion set can remain in the place for 3 days while the pump is clip-belt worn. There is a quick-disconnect feature for the tubing. The pump delivers insulin in two modes. In Basal rate mode, the delivery is continuous in small doses similar to a pancreas, for example 0.15 units per hour throughout the day. Basal rates are set to meet individual metabolic rates. In Bolus mode, the delivery is programmed to be a one-time delivery prior to ea Continue reading >>

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