diabetestalk.net

Metforming

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin: Current Knowledge

Metformin: Current Knowledge

Go to: Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders in which the blood glucose is higher than normal levels, due to insufficiency of insulin release or improper response of cells to insulin, resulting in high blood pressure. The resultant hyperglycemia produces sever complications. Metformin drug has been shown to prevent diabetes in people who are at high risk and decrease most of the diabetic complications. Recent reports on metformin, not only indicate some implications such as renoprotective properties have been suggested for metformin, but some reports indicate its adverse effects as well that are negligible when its benefits are brought into account. We aimed here to review the new implications of metformin and discuss about the concerns in the use of metformin, referring to the recently published papers. Keywords: Diabetes, diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy, glucose, metformin, new applications, polycystic ovary syndrome, renoprotection Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders in which the blood glucose is higher than normal levels, due to insufficiency of insulin release or improper response of cells to insulin, resulting in high blood pressure. The resultant hyperglycemia produces the classical symptoms of polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia. It may also cause nerve problems, kidney problems, and blindness, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction, increase in heart attack or stroke.[1] Metformin (a biguanide derivative), by controlling blood glucose level decreases these complications. Metformin works by helping to restore the body's response to insulin. It decreases the amount of blood sugar that the liver produces and that the intestines or stomach absorb.[2] Metformin, other than hypoglycemic activity, has b Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) And Weight Loss

Metformin (glucophage) And Weight Loss

Tweet Metformin, a generic diabetes treatment usually sold under the brand name Glucophage, may help people with diabetes to lose weight by lowering their appetites. Insulin makes people overweight by acting on the brain to cause hunger, making the liver manufacture fat and fill fat cells in the stomach. Avoiding obesity is a matter of avoiding foods high in blood sugar, and taking medication that prevents blood sugar levels from climbing too high. Glucophage function The function of diabetes drug Glucophage is to reduce the release levels of sugar from your liver. This stops blood glucose levels from rising too high, and means that the body does not have to produce as much insulin. Therefore, the patient is not as hungry. Type 2 diabetes drug Metformin (Glucophage) may be used successfully as a medication for type 2 diabetes. Lowers insulin levels It lowers insulin levels, helps to prevent diabetes complications, and helps people with diabetes to lose weight. Losing weight whilst taking Metformin (Glucophage) means also eating a healthy diet. Eating lots of foods that boost blood sugar levels will counteract the effects of Metformin. Most doctors prescribe 500mg of Metformin (Glucophage) before eating. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a s Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

A popular oral drug for treating Type 2 diabetes. Metformin (brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet) is a member of a class of drugs called biguanides that helps lower blood glucose levels by improving the way the body handles insulin — namely, by preventing the liver from making excess glucose and by making muscle and fat cells more sensitive to available insulin. Metformin not only lowers blood glucose levels, which in the long term reduces the risk of diabetic complications, but it also lowers blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels and does not cause weight gain the way insulin and some other oral blood-glucose-lowering drugs do. Overweight, high cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels all increase the risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in people with Type 2 diabetes. Another advantage of metformin is that it does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when it is the only diabetes medicine taken. Metformin is typically taken two to three times a day, with meals. The extended-release formula (Glucophage XR) is taken once a day, with the evening meal. The most common side effects of metformin are nausea and diarrhea, which usually go away over time. A more serious side effect is a rare but potentially fatal condition called lactic acidosis, in which dangerously high levels of lactic acid build up in the bloodstream. Lactic acidosis is most likely to occur in people with kidney disease, liver disease, or congestive heart failure, or in those who drink alcohol regularly. (If you have more than four alcoholic drinks a week, metformin may not be the best medicine for you.) Unfortunately, many doctors ignore these contraindications (conditions that make a particular treatment inadvisable) and prescribe metformin to people Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Fortamet Glucophage Glucophage XR Glumetza Riomet Descriptions Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your doctor will teach you what to do if this happens. Metformin does not help patients does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Tablet, Extended Release Solution Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Generic Name: metformin (met FOR min) Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use metformin if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to metformin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking this medicine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Common metformin side effects may include: low blood sugar; nausea, upset stomach; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doc Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Tweet Glucophage and Metformin are often mentioned in relation to diabetes treatment. But what exactly is Glucophage and how does Glucophage help control type 2 diabetes? The following guide to Glucophage should help you to understand more about this medication, its side effects and its value. What is Glucophage? Glucophage tablets (and Glucophage SR tablets) each have an active ingredient called Metformin hydrochloride. Metformin is widely used to aid in the control of blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. How does Glucophage help people with type 2 diabetes? Amongst people with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Furthermore, the cells in the body may be resistant to any insulin that is present. Normally, insulin would instruct cells to remove sugar from the blood, but in people with diabetes blood sugar levels can climb too high. As we said before, Glucophage contains the ingredient Metformin. Metformin (Metformin hydrochloride) is a type of medicine known as a biguanide. This works to lower the amount of sugar in the blood of people with diabetes. It does this by lowering the amount of sugar produced in the liver, and also increasing the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. The cells are therefore more able to remove sugar from the blood. Metformin also slows the absorption of sugars from the intestines. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels between and after meals. Who is Glucophage prescribed to? Glucophage is usually prescribed as a treatment for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese. When diet and exercise fail to adequately control blood glucose levels, Glucophage is prescribed. Sometimes, this medicine is used in conjunction with other anti-diabetic medication. How often do people Continue reading >>

Metformin And Dppos: 15 Year Results

Metformin And Dppos: 15 Year Results

Does the benefit of metformin for type 2 diabetes prevention persist over time? Kieren Mather, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, discusses the long-term results of using metformin for diabetes prevention. Thank you, Dr. Mather, for sharing your expertise on metformin and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). To learn more about metformin and diabetes, check out blog posts from other experts in the series. Interested in learning more about metformin? Subscribe to the blog . The long-term results of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) tell us that the beneficial effect of metformin in terms of preventing or delaying the progression of diabetes persists over the entire 15 years of follow-up, and its looking to persist into the predictable future. In the original publication of the DPP benefit from the first 3.2 yearsthats the way this study worked outwe saw that there was a particular beneficial effect of metformin among younger folks who were more overweight. Then in a subsequent analysis, we found that there was a particularly strong beneficial effect among women who reported a prior history of gestational diabetes before they entered the study. So, that was our expectation as we moved forward was that we would see this persisting benefit, at least in the subgroups. Weve done the analysis now out to 15 years, and we dont see a persisting benefit related to age or related to body mass index, obesity, but we do see a persisting benefit among women who came in with a prior history of gestational diabetes. It may not be widely known, but women who have a history of gestational diabetes have the single highest risk of progressing to overt diabetes, so thats a group who really do warr Continue reading >>

Glucophage, Glucophage Xr (metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Glucophage, Glucophage Xr (metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Initial: 500 mg PO q12hr or 850 mg PO qDay with meals; increase q2Weeks Maintenance: 1500-2550 mg/day PO divided q8-12hr with meal Glucophage XR: 500 mg PO qDay with dinner; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Fortamet: 500-1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2500 mg/day Glumetza: 1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Hepatic impairment: Avoid use; risk of lactic acidosis eGFR 30-45 mL/min/1.73 m: Not recommended to initiate treatment Monitor eGFR at least annually or more often for those at risk for renal impairment (eg, elderly) If eGFR falls below 45mL/min/1.73 m while taking metformin, risks and benefits of continuing therapy should be evaluated If eGFR falls below 30 mL/min/1.73 m: while taking metformin, discontinue the drug Orphan designation for treatment of pediatric polycystic ovary syndrome EffRx Pharmaceuticals SA; Wolleraustrass 41 B; 8807 Freienbach (SZ); SWITZERLAND Orphan designation for treatment of progressive myoclonus epilepsy type 2 (Lafora disease) Consorcio Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red, M.P. (CIBER); Monforte de Lemos, 3-5 Pabellon 11; Madrid, Spain Maintenance: Titrate qWeek by 500 mg; no more than 2000 mg/day in divided doses Initial: 500 mg PO q12hr or 850 mg PO qDay with meals; increase q2Weeks Maintenance: 1500-2550 mg/day PO divided q8-12hr with meal Glucophage XR: 500 mg PO qDay with dinner; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Fortamet: 500-1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2500 mg/day eGFR 30-45 mL/min/1.73 m: Initiating not recommended Obtain GFR at least annually in all patients taking metformin; assess eGFR more frequently in patients at increased risk for renal impairment (eg, elderly) If eGFR falls to <4 Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

The most frequently prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes. Metformin does not cause weight gain, and is usually the first choice of medication to treat type 2 diabetes. Biguanide (Metformin) Metformin’s main site of action is at the liver to reduce the excessive sugar release seen in type 2 diabetes. Metformin does not cause weight gain, and is usually the first choice of medication to treat type 2 diabetes. However, if you have kidney or liver problems, heart failure, or are very sick, metformin cannot be used. The main side effects of metformin are diarrhea and stomach upset or cramping. It is important to take metformin with food to reduce stomach-related side effects. A very rare side effect (less than 1 person per 100,000 patients taking metformin) is lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in your blood). Lactic acidosis is very dangerous, and usually fatal. Generally, the people who develop this rare side effect are the ones who shouldn’t have been taking metformin in the first place (people with kidney problems or heart failure, or alcoholism). Metformin is also called a euglycemic, which means it may restore the blood sugar to normal or non-diabetic levels. If you are treated with metformin alone, you should not experience low blood sugars. And if you are treated with metformin and other blood sugar normalizing (“euglycemic”) agents (such as thiazolidinediones, starch blockers, or incretins) you also should not have low blood sugars. However, hypoglycemia or low blood sugars may develop when you take metformin together with insulin releasing pills and insulin, because they raise insulin levels and increase the risk of developing lows. In short, metformin decreases glucose production by the liver The most common side effects are: Diarrhea and stom Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

More in diabetes