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Metformin Vs Metformin Hcl

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

If you have high blood glucose levels, you may take metformin hydrochloride, an oral anti-hyperglycemic medication that lowers blood sugar. Metformin may also help you lose weight in some cases by decreasing your appetite. Clinical studies have not proven that metformin helps you lose weight if you don't have Type 2 diabetes or other metabolic disorders that cause insulin resistance. It may help prevent weight gain or cause modest weight loss if you're taking antipsychotic drugs that cause weight gain. Metformin comes in several doses, including a 500-milligram extended release form, which you may find easier to take. Video of the Day Metformin might help you lose weight if you have metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary disease, both associated with insulin resistance. The pancreas releases insulin in response to glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin helps cells remove glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat large amounts of high-carb foods, the pancreas may overproduce insulin to keep up. Eventually, your cells stop responding to the insulin and your blood glucose levels rise. Because your cells feel starved for energy, you feel hungry all the time and may crave carbohydrates. Metformin helps cells respond better to insulin, so you don't feel as hungry. Insulin can also cause your liver to convert extra calories to fat. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose your liver produces, and also decreases the amount of glucose absorbed in your intestines. Decreased amounts of glucose in your bloodstream results in less glucose absorbed by your cells. When you absorb less glucose, you lose weight. An Indian study published in the March 2011 "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology" reported that metformin increased weight loss in people taking olanzapine, an antipsychoti Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin (mod Vs Osm): What’s The Difference?

Metformin Vs Metformin (mod Vs Osm): What’s The Difference?

Metformin and extended release metformin are used in type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control in combination with diet and exercise. What are the advantages of extended release metformin? The extended release tablets are taken ONCE DAILY due to their slow release of the medication throughout the day. Extended release tablets are also easier on the stomach which is important for compliance when first starting a new medication. Fortamet and Glumetza are both extended release metformin options, but because the way they release metformin over time is different, they aren’t equivalent to each other. Glumetza is the MOD metformin product. So what does MOD stand for? MOD stands for modified release. Glumetza utilizes advanced polymer delivery technology known as AcuForm® (for the 500 mg tablet) and Smartcoat® (for the 1000 mg tablet). It delivers the metformin to the site of absorption, the duodenum, over a time span of 8 – 9 hours. The tablet then remains in the stomach for an extended period until all of the active drug is released. Does Glumetza have a generic? No. Glumetza does not currently have a substitutable generic equivalent. What is the MAX dose and available strengths of Glumetza? Glumetza comes in 500 mg and 1000 mg extended release tablets, with a max dose of 2000 mg per day. Fortamet is the OSM metformin product. So what does OSM stand for? OSM stands for osmotic release. Fortamet (and its generic equivalents) use single-composition osmotic technology. When you swallow the tablet, water is taken up through the membrane of the pill, which in turn dissolves the drug in the core so it can exit through the laser drilled ports in the membrane. The rate of drug delivery is constant, and will continue as long as there is undissolved drug present in the core ta Continue reading >>

Significant Reduction In A1c Levels When Patients Need More

Significant Reduction In A1c Levels When Patients Need More

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. Symptoms included malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Laboratory abnormalities included elevated blood lactate levels, anion gap acidosis, increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL. Risk factors include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs, age >65 years old, radiological studies with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided in the Full Prescribing Information. If lactic acidosis is suspected, discontinue XIGDUO XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended. Contraindications Warnings and Precautions Hypotension: Dapagliflozin causes intravascular volume contraction, and symptomatic hypotension can occur. Assess and correct volume status before initiating XIGDUO XR in patients with impaired renal function, elderly patients, or patients on loop diuretics. Monitor for hypotension. Ketoacidosis has been reported in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes receiving dapagliflozin. Some cases were fatal. Assess patients who present with signs and symptoms of metabolic acidosis for ketoacidosis, regardless of blood glucose level. If suspected, discontinue XIGDUO XR, evaluate and treat promptly. Before initiating XIGDUO XR, consider risk factors for ketoacidosis. Patients on XIGDUO XR may require monitoring and temporary discontinuation in situations known to predispose to ketoacidosis. Acute Kidney Injury and Impai Continue reading >>

Glumetza

Glumetza

GLUMETZA® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-release Tablets DESCRIPTION GLUMETZA (metformin hydrochloride) extended-release tablet is an oral antihyperglycemic medication used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula of metformin hydrochloride (metformin HCl) is as shown: Metformin HCl is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5•HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin HCl is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. GLUMETZA tablets are modified release dosage forms that contain 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin HCl. Each 500 mg tablet contains coloring, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose and polyethylene oxide. Each 1000 mg tablet contains colloidal silicon dioxide, polyvinyl alcohol, crospovidone, glyceryl behenate, polyacrylate dispersion, hypromellose, talc, polyethylene glycol, eudragit, titanium dioxide, simethicone emulsion, polysorbate and coloring. GLUMETZA 500 mg and 1000 mg tablets are formulated to gradually release metformin to the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Extended Release Compared To Immediate Release Formula On Glycemic Control And Glycemic Variability In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Effects Of Metformin Extended Release Compared To Immediate Release Formula On Glycemic Control And Glycemic Variability In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate, in a randomized clinical trial, the effects of metformin immediate release (IR) compared with metformin extended release (XR) on the gastrointestinal tolerability and glycemic control. Materials and methods We enrolled 253 Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes not well controlled by diet (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] >7.0% and <8.5%). Patients were randomized to metformin IR or metformin XR for a period of 6 months at the maximum tolerated dose. The average dose of metformin IR used was 2,000±1,000 mg/day, while that of metformin XR was 1,000±500 mg/day. We evaluated body weight, HbA1c, fasting and postprandial glucose, fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), lipid profile, and levels of some adipocytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), visfatin, and vaspin. Moreover, at the baseline and after 6 months, we administered patients some validated questionnaires to assess patients’ satisfaction toward treatments. After 6 months, both formulations gave a similar reduction in body weight and body mass index (BMI); however, metformin XR gave a greater improvement in glycemic control, FPI, and HOMA-IR, compared with both baseline and metformin IR. A reduction in total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was observed with metformin XR compared with IR. Levels of TNF-α, hs-CRP, and vaspin were reduced by metformin XR but not by the IR formulation. Metformin XR also raised the levels of visfatin. Metformin XR formulation seems to be more effective than metformin IR in improving glyco-metabolic control, lipid profile, and levels of some adipocytokines in patients with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Versus Metformin Immediate Release In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes (consent)

Metformin Extended Release Versus Metformin Immediate Release In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes (consent)

This is a Phase 4, prospective, open label, randomized, parallel controlled multicenter trial in which metformin extended release (XR) will be compared with metformin immediate release (IR) for the gastrointestinal tolerability and efficacy in the newly diagnosed subjects with Type 2 diabetes who have glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value between 7.0 to 10.0 percent (%). Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 532 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: CONSENT - Comparison of metfOrmin XR to IR as moNotherapy in the Newly diagnoSed Type 2 diabEtes Patients for the gastroiNtestinal Tolerability and Efficacy: a Randomized, Parallel Control, Open-label and Multicenter Study Study Start Date : December 2014 Primary Completion Date : November 2015 Study Completion Date : April 2016 Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Metformin IR Drug: Metformin IR Subjects will receive Metformin Immediate Release (IR) tablets, orally once daily at a dose of 500 milligram (mg) for 1 week, and then dose will increase with increments of 500 mg every week in first 2 weeks to 1500 mg. After that dose will increase up to maximum dose of 2000 mg for the next 2 weeks and will be maintained at 2000 mg until Week 16. Other Name: Glucophage IR Experimental: Metformin XR Drug: Metformin XR Subjects will receive Metformin Extended Release (XR) tablets, orally once daily at a dose of 500 mg for 1 week, and then dose will increase with increments of 500 mg every week in first 2 weeks to 1500 mg. After that dose will increase up to maximum dose of 2000 mg for the next 2 weeks and will be maintained at 2000 mg until Week 16. Other Name: Glucophage XR Primary Outcome M Continue reading >>

Compare Janumet Vs. Metformin

Compare Janumet Vs. Metformin

This 2-in-1 combination can lower the number of pills you have to take daily. Lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 2.5%. Available in extended and immediate release forms to allow better control of your blood sugar. Doesn't increase your appetite unlike other anti-diabetic medicines. Does not cause hypoglycemia or very low blood sugar. One of the few diabetes medicines that lowers the risk of death from diabetes-related complications. Rarely causes low blood sugar. 79 reviews so far Have you used Janumet (sitagliptin / metformin)? Leave a review 938 reviews so far Have you used Glucophage (metformin)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Pay Attention To Your Metformin Hcl Er Diabetes Costs

Pay Attention To Your Metformin Hcl Er Diabetes Costs

If you examine your claims data, you’ll likely discover that among your “Top 50 Most Expensive Drugs” is a line item for generic “metformin HCL ER”. Metformin HCL is a longstanding, very inexpensive diabetes treatment. And ER stands for “extended release”. There are metformin HCL ER treatments that are very inexpensive. So the question is: Why would this line item be among your “Top 50” most expensive drugs? The answer: There are certain generic forms of metformin HCL ER that are absurdly expensive, while others bear the low-costs that you’d expect. But it’s reasonably likely that many (if not most) of your beneficiaries are unknowingly using the high-cost forms of this drug. To help you understand what is taking place, we provide you with the following Chart, reflecting, first, the “immediate release” version of metformin, and then the 3 “extended release” generic versions of this drug. Our 3 columns for each drug identify each of the dosage strengths, the GSN identifiers, and the per ‘unit’ cost based on current retail Average Acquisition Costs (AACs). Focus in particular on the far right column, reflecting the per unit AACs (reported average retail acquisition costs): Metformin (immediate release): The reference drug is Glucophage: · 500 mg 13318 $0.0141 · 850 mg 16441 $0.023 · 1,000 mg 40974 $0.0234 (i) Metformin ER: The reference drug is Glucophage XR: · 500 mg 46754 $0.0395 · 750 mg 52080 $0.0526 (ii) Metformin OSM: The reference drug is Fortamet: · 500 mg 54019 $5.2278 · 1,000 mg 54018 $10.9621 (iii) Metformin ER: The reference drug is Glumetza: · 500 mg 61267 $36.2147 · 1,000 mg 61273 $83.3821 As you can see, there are big differences in cost – per unit – for the generic versions of Fortamet and Glumetza! Thus, it Continue reading >>

Metformin Er Vs Metformin Hcl

Metformin Er Vs Metformin Hcl

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I thought extended release was calledMetformin ER or Metformin XR and regular doage was taken once a day. and Metformin HCL was plan ol Metformin taken twice a day. While my fast # is a bit (*110'ish)high I was told Metformin would delay the onset of T2, I don't have insulian resistance, my liver likes to dump I was told. Although ths was the ARNP who said thatnot the Endo/DR. In peoples experience is this true? I asked for Met ER and was given HCL. I don't understand why they didn't listen to me. Also what is the min dosage of ER and is it one or two pills? The ARNP seemed to want to jam Metformin down my throat. A1C is only 6.0, GAD is 0, Cpep is 2.6. Any ideas on Metformin ER delaying onset to T2? To most an A1c of 6.0 is diabetic so don't worry about delaying onset of T2. I agree with your desire to use metformin ER instead of normal metformin. Many people find it easier on their digestive systems. I am on Metformin HCL and take 1000mg (2 pills) twice a day. I have been on Metformin ER before and took the same dosage. The real issue you need to grasp right now is it's time to embrace a lifestyle change. Eat a low carbohydrate diet and exercise. At this point you might be able to drop the metformin pretty quickly and control your blood glucose with diet and exercise alone. It's very late in the game for me but my NP and I discussed reducing my metformin dosage just a couple of weeks ago due to my good control with diet, exercise and a new med (Invokana) that I've been taking. Be aware that the metformin will most likely cause some tummy upset up to and including the runs. However, your bod Continue reading >>

What Is Difference Between Metformin 500mg And Metformin Hcl 500mg?

What Is Difference Between Metformin 500mg And Metformin Hcl 500mg?

Home Q & A Questions What is difference between... What is difference between Metformin 500mg and Metformin HCL 500mg? Nothing, the hydrochloride is just the rest of the chemical name. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Generic Name: metformin (Pronunciation: met FOR min) What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is the most important information I should know about metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion; swelling or rapid weight gain; or fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms. Les Continue reading >>

Metformin - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Metformin - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an orally administered drug used to lower blood glucose concentrations in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).104 It is antihyperglycemic in action, and increases sensitivity to insulin by inhibiting hepatic glucose production and by increasing glucose uptake and utilization in muscle. Alison E. Bretnall, Graham S. Clarke, in Analytical Profiles of Drug Substances and Excipients , 1998 Metformin hydrochloride formulations have the principal tradenames of Diabefagos®, Diabetosan®, Diabex®, Glucophage®, Haurymellin®, Meguan®, Metaguanide®, and Metiguanide®. The p-chlorophenoxyacetate salt formulation has the tradename of Glucinan®, and the embonate salt formulation tradename is Stagid®. The CAS Registry number for metformin free base is 657-24-9, and the CAS Registry number for metformin hydrochloride is 1115-70-4. The elemental composition of metformin hydrochloride is C = 29.0%, H = 7.3%, Cl = 21.4%, and N = 42.3%. The elemental composition of metformin free base is C = 37.2%, H = 8.6%, and N = 54.2%. Metformin hydrochloride is a white hygroscopic crystalline powder, which is odorless and has a bitter taste. R.C.L. Page, in Side Effects of Drugs Annual , 2010 Metformin crosses the placenta, but it is not thought to increase the risk of congenital abnormalities (35R). In a randomized comparison of metformin and insulin in pregnancy in 733 women with gestational diabetes at 20–33 weeks, 195 women used metformin alone, 168 metformin + insulin, and 370 insulin (36C). The initial dosage of metformin was 500 mg once or twice daily and it was titrated to a maximum of 2.5 g/day. Insulin was added if blood glucose targets were not met. Information was not given about the insulin regimens used. Severe hyp Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I asked my doctor about the metformin ER and he prescribed it, but at least through our insurance provider, the ER format carries a $250 out of pocket price vs the $12 for standard metformin. Just want people to be aware of the price difference. I will just deal with the ongoing diarrhea... OH no, the diarrhea just gets worse. I'll spare the details, but I prefer not to wear diapers before my time. I think you can the 500 mg tablets for example at Walmart for $4.00. Get the doctor to rewrite the script. I should go look at my insurance and see what it cost them. Just take two. The instructions say to take them once a day, but I find twice a day wasn't as bad on my stomach. I eventually had to give those up too. I'm sitting here trying to decide how I can continue taking them. About the diarhhea and metformin. Two years ago I thought that my diarhhea was caused by the metformin but found out I had c. diff in part because of antibiotic use for cellulitis. If you have recently been taking antibiotics, buy yourself some probiotics (over the counter) and stay on them for two weeks at least. I also find that probiotics help with any digestive upsets. That bout I had with cellulitis really unbalanced my flora and fauna. Possibly, this could be your problem also. now the doctors will prescribe the probiotics with the antibotics but I have been taking one. I had diarhea with one and throwing up with the ER version. Continue reading >>

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