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Metformin Vs Diet And Exercise

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of metformin on the acute metabolic response to submaximal exercise, the effect of exercise on plasma metformin concentrations, and the interaction between metformin and exercise on the subsequent response to a standardized meal. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this randomized crossover study. Metformin or placebo was given for 28 days, followed by the alternate condition for 28 days. On the last 2 days of each condition, participants were assessed during a nonexercise and a subsequent exercise day. Exercise took place in the morning and involved a total of 35 min performed at three different submaximal intensities. RESULTS Metformin increased heart rate and plasma lactate during exercise (both P ≤ 0.01) but lowered respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.03) without affecting total energy expenditure, which suggests increased fat oxidation. Metformin plasma concentrations were greater at several, but not all, time points on the exercise day compared with the nonexercise day. The glycemic response to a standardized meal was reduced by metformin, but the reduction was attenuated when exercise was added (metformin × exercise interaction, P = 0.05). Glucagon levels were highest in the combined exercise and metformin condition. CONCLUSIONS This study reveals several ways by which metformin and exercise therapies can affect each other. By increasing heart rate, metformin could lead to the prescription of lower exercise workloads. Furthermore, under the tested conditions, exercise interfered with the glucose-lowering effect of metformin. It is estimated that there were over 42 million prescriptions for metformin in the U.S. in 2009 (top 10 for generic drugs) (1). Along with these pres Continue reading >>

Clinical Alert: Diet And Exercise Dramatically Delay Type 2 Diabetes; Diabetes Medication Metformin Also Effective

Clinical Alert: Diet And Exercise Dramatically Delay Type 2 Diabetes; Diabetes Medication Metformin Also Effective

Clinical Alert: Diet and Exercise Dramatically Delay Type 2 Diabetes; Diabetes Medication Metformin Also Effective National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) At least 10 million Americans at high risk for type 2 diabetes can sharply lower their chances of getting the disease with diet and exercise, according to the findings of a major clinical trial announced by HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "In view of the rapidly rising rates of obesity and diabetes in America, this good news couldn't come at a better time," said Secretary Thompson. "So many of our health problems can be avoided through diet, exercise and making sure we take care of ourselves. By promoting healthy lifestyles, we can improve the quality of life for all Americans, and reduce health care costs dramatically." The same study found that treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) also reduces diabetes risk, though less dramatically, in people at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants randomly assigned to intensive lifestyle intervention reduced their risk of getting type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. On average, this group maintained their physical activity at 30 minutes per day, usually with walking or other moderate intensity exercise, and lost 5-7 percent of their body weight. Participants randomized to treatment with metformin reduced their risk of getting type 2 diabetes by 31 percent. The findings came from the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a major clinical trial comparing diet and exercise to treatment with metformin in 3,234 people with impaired glucose tolerance, a condition that often precedes diabetes. On the advice of the DPP's external data monitoring board, the trial ended a year early bec Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Intervention Vs. Metformin For Prediabetes

Lifestyle Intervention Vs. Metformin For Prediabetes

Lifestyle Intervention vs. Metformin for Prediabetes According to the American Diabetes Association, about 86 million Americans have prediabetes a number that is most likely rising every day. The recent, sustained rise in cases of prediabetes defined as having elevated blood glucose that isnt high enough to qualify as diabetes has led many researchers to try to find ways to reverse this troubling trend. One therapy that has shown promise for prediabetes is the oral diabetes drug metformin . As we noted here at Diabetes Flashpoints a couple of years ago, the American Diabetes Association recommends metformin for certain cases of prediabetes, and has done so since 2008. But some studies including one we wrote about in 2011 have found that lifestyle intervention programs may have a more beneficial effect for people with prediabetes than metformin. In a recent study, researchers sought to investigate the weight-loss benefits of metformin versus lifestyle intervention in Hispanic women, a group in which this issue hadnt been studied before. Published last month in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the study included 92 women with an average age of 45 who were randomly assigned to one of three groups: metformin, lifestyle intervention, and standard care (which consisted of monitoring and recommendations to exercise and lose weight). As noted in a Healio article on the study , the lifestyle intervention program consisted of sessions with community health workers in which participants were coached on how to set goals, control cravings, and problem-solve to improve their diet and get at least 150 minutes of exercise per week. Members of the metformin group took 850 milligrams of the drug twice daily. Over 12 months, members of the lifestyle intervention group lost an Continue reading >>

Metformin With Exercise

Metformin With Exercise

Diabetics can add exercise to medication for improved sugar levels.Photo Credit: Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images A mother of two and passionate fitness presenter, Lisa M. Wolfe had her first fitness article published in 2001. She is the author of six fitness books and holds an Associate of Arts in exercise science from Oakland Community College. When not writing, Wolfe is hula-hooping, kayaking, walking or cycling. Diabetics suffering from uncontrolled blood sugar, are on a quest for the most helpful combination of medication, diet and exercise. Metformin is one medication used to control blood sugar. Exercise is another option to help regulate the glucose -- or sugar -- levels of the body. Combined, metformin and exercise create a powerful weapon against out-of-control sugar levels. Controlling glucose levels is the most important concern for a diabetic. When you have diabetes, your body does not use insulin effectively. Insulin's purpose is to bind with sugar molecules and transport them into the cells for energy. In a diabetic, excess sugar is found in the bloodstream due to insulin's inefficiency. Metformin was approved in 1994 to help a diabetic's system decrease the amount of sugar made in the liver and decrease the amount of sugar absorbed in the intestines. This is beneficial because excess sugar levels can lead to kidney damage, blindness or heart disease. Another option for controlling sugar levels is exercise. All types of exercise will lead to health gains. Both aerobic, which includes walking, running and swimming, and anaerobic, which includes strength training, are beneficial in reducing blood-sugar levels. Aerobic exercise will also strengthen your heart, which is a protection against heart disease. Strength training trains your muscle cells to use gl Continue reading >>

Do I Need Metformin Or Just Diet & Exercise

Do I Need Metformin Or Just Diet & Exercise

Do I Need Metformin or just Diet & Exercise Do I Need Metformin or just Diet & Exercise I was clinically diagnosed in 2010/2011 with Type II Diabetes because I had two consecutive test over 126 (One was 129 & Second 127). At the time I thought I was paying attention to the issue and somewhat Diet & Exercising. The next time I went to my home Dr I was told my A1c was 6 and I had high levels of Protein in my Urine. The Dr wanted to put me on Metformin, but I did not want to be on any medications and took steps to live a very healthy life. I lost 50 plus pounds, and ran two Boston Marathons. During the diet and training I went back for an updated Blood Test and my A1c went down to 5.1 and no other issues. The Dr said if I did not know your history I would not even discuss Diabetes with you. This was 2012/2013. As with most it did not last, I slowly put all the weight back on and went back to my old ways. In 2015 I visited the Dr again and she did my A1c and it was 6.6, once again I was faced with getting healthy. Long story short I did not. Fast forward to today 4/5/2018 I was just informed my A1c is 8.1 and I have high Protein levels in my urine again and the Dr wants to get me on Metformin. Once again I believe I can take care of this on my own with Diet and Exercise. In the last month I have lost weight and I am running again. I have been checking my blood sugar now for a bout a week and my levels have already gone from 178 in the morning time to 110 two hours after meals (much lower in morning too). I really do not want to be on Meds for this, because I truly believe I can live with it, as long as I am healthy. I understand that if I screw up this time, I will have to go on the Meds. I was on it for 10 years with no ill effects and believe it helped get my BGL into "n Continue reading >>

Reduction In The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes With Lifestyle Intervention Or Metformin

Reduction In The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes With Lifestyle Intervention Or Metformin

Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes with Lifestyle Intervention or Metformin Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 8 percent of adults in the United States. Some risk factors elevated plasma glucose concentrations in the fasting state and after an oral glucose load, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle are potentially reversible. We hypothesized that modifying these factors with a lifestyle-intervention program or the administration of metformin would prevent or delay the development of diabetes. We randomly assigned 3234 nondiabetic persons with elevated fasting and post-load plasma glucose concentrations to placebo, metformin (850 mg twice daily), or a lifestyle-modification program with the goals of at least a 7 percent weight loss and at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week. The mean age of the participants was 51 years, and the mean body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 34.0; 68 percent were women, and 45 percent were members of minority groups. The average follow-up was 2.8 years. The incidence of diabetes was 11.0, 7.8, and 4.8 cases per 100 person-years in the placebo, metformin, and lifestyle groups, respectively. The lifestyle intervention reduced the incidence by 58 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 48 to 66 percent) and metformin by 31 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 17 to 43 percent), as compared with placebo; the lifestyle intervention was significantly more effective than metformin. To prevent one case of diabetes during a period of three years, 6.9 persons would have to participate in the lifestyle-intervention program, and 13.9 would have to receive metformin. Lifestyle changes and treatment with metformin both reduced Continue reading >>

Drugs Vs. Lifestyle For Preventing Diabetes

Drugs Vs. Lifestyle For Preventing Diabetes

In just one decade, the number of people with diabetes has more than doubled. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, by 2050, one out of every three of us may have diabetes. What’s the big deal? Well, the “consequences of diabetes are legion.” Diabetes is the number one cause of adult-onset blindness, the number one cause of kidney failure, and the number one cause of surgical amputations. What can we do to prevent it? The onset of Type 2 diabetes is gradual, with most individuals progressing through a state of prediabetes, a condition now striking approximately one in three Americans, but only about one in ten even knows they have it. Since current methods of treating diabetes remain inadequate, prevention is preferable, but what works better: lifestyle changes or drugs? We didn’t know until a landmark study, highlighted in my video, How to Prevent Prediabetes from Turning into Diabetes, was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Thousands were randomized to get a double dose of the leading anti-diabetes drug, or diet and exercise. The drug, metformin, is probably the safest diabetes drug there is. It causes diarrhea in about half, makes one in four nauseous, about one in ten suffer from asthenia (physical weakness and fatigue), but only about 1 in 67,000 are killed by the drug every year. And the drug worked. Compared to placebo, in terms of the percentage of people developing diabetes within the four-year study period, fewer people in the drug group developed diabetes. But diet and exercise alone worked better. The lifestyle intervention reduced diabetes incidence by 58 percent, compared to only 31 percent with the drug. The lifestyle intervention was significantly more effective than the drug, and had fewer side effects. More Continue reading >>

Exercise, Diet, Metformin Can Keep Diabetes At Bay For 10 Years

Exercise, Diet, Metformin Can Keep Diabetes At Bay For 10 Years

Diet, exercise and, to a lesser extent, an inexpensive drug can help keep Type 2 diabetes at bay for up to 10 years, researchers said. In a new study, individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes significantly reduced their chances of developing the condition by taking the diabetes drug metformin and adhering to a diet-and-exercise program, according to Dr. William C. Knowler and colleagues on the government's Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Writing online in The Lancet, the researchers said people initially assigned to diet and physical activity modifications showed a 34 percent reduction in later diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during follow-up, compared to a group that took a placebo pill. Another group assigned to metformin treatment were at 18 percent less risk for type 2 diabetes compared with the placebo group. Metformin is a popular oral drug often used as a first-line treatment for incipient Type 2 diabetes. "Prevention or delay of diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin can persist for at least 10 years," Knowler and colleagues wrote. Beginning in 1996, the original study assigned more than 3,800 people showing impaired glucose tolerance, but not full-blown diabetes, to participate in an intensive diet-and-exercise program, to receive metformin, or to receive placebo. By 2001, the results showed a 58 percent reduction in diabetes diagnoses in the diet-and-exercise group and a 31 percent reduction in the metformin group. In addition to diabetes incidence, the researchers also tracked body weight of the subjects in the study. What they found was that those taking the metformin lost about 2 kg (4.4 pounds) in the first year of the trial, which was maintained during the rest of the randomized phase and throughout the follow-up. During the randomized Continue reading >>

Diet & Exercise Vs Metformin: Which Is Better For Lowering Diabetes Risk?

Diet & Exercise Vs Metformin: Which Is Better For Lowering Diabetes Risk?

Diet & Exercise VS Metformin: Which is better for lowering Diabetes Risk? If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Diet & Exercise VS Metformin: Which is better for lowering Diabetes Risk? The most frequently cited evidence is a large clinical trial conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. It randomly assigned more than 3,000 pre-diabetic adults to one of three groups. One group received a placebo, another the oral diabetes drug metformin, which decreases glucose production, and the final group took part in an intensive lifestyle modification program of diet, exercise, and behavior modification counseling aimed at helping them lose 7 percent of their body weight. They were put on a low-fat, low-calorie diet, exercised 150 minutes a week, and sat down regularly with a case manager for one-on-one behavior modification sessions. The results, published in 2002, were impressive: Over nearly three years, people in the lifestyle intervention group were 58 percent less likely to develop diabetes, while those on metformin shaved their risk by just 31 percent. Prevention and intensive management are the keys to stopping the epidemic By Michelle Andrews, U.S. News & World Report Diabetes experts from around the world recently gathered in New York City to discuss various techniques that alter patients' digestive systems to help them lose weight and get their blood sugar under control. One method, gastric bypass surgery, is approved only for weight loss but also short-circuits diabetes in many cases. Another approachfor now, experimentalinvolv Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

My goal is to be as healthy as I can. If something happens and one day I'm back on medication, my goal is still to be healthy. It had been about a year since Akua Jitahadi felt like herself. But she was 51 and expected menopause to kick in soon. Plus, she and her daughter had just moved to oppressively hot Arizona. So she brushed off the tired, sluggish feeling as a side effect of being a middle-aged woman adjusting to sweltering temps. And then, overnight, her vision dimmed. Something was most definitely wrong. The verdict from her doctor: type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. "Of course, I broke down in tears," Jitahadi, now 55, says. "I wasn't ready to hear this. I always associated diabetes with 'Oh no, it's really bad.' " After Jitahadi spent a few weeks on medication, her vision cleared and she began to feel better. It didn't last long. "I hated metformin . I had all the colon and digestive issues on it," she says. "I never knew if I would be OK on it or if I'd be nauseous. I'd question whether I wanted to go out with my friends." When she asked for an alternative medication, her doctor said metformin was the best drug for the job, so Jitahadi stuck it out for a year. After that, she decided to make major lifestyle changes in hopes of quitting her medications. That proved more difficult than she had imagined. She hadn't seen a diabetes educator. The only dietitian covered by her insurer was too far away. And her doctor's sole advice was for Jitahadi to watch what she ate. "I was scared in the beginning," says Jitahadi. "It was through friends and starting to read [about diabetes] that I knew I could do this. I could get through this." Jitahadi bought books on diabetes, nutrition, the glycemic index, and diabetes-friendly meals. Instead of slightly modifying he Continue reading >>

Over Long Term, Diet And Exercise Are Best To Prevent Diabetes

Over Long Term, Diet And Exercise Are Best To Prevent Diabetes

September 25, 2015 / 3:17 PM / in 3 years Over long term, diet and exercise are best to prevent diabetes (This story has been refiled to correct the affiliation of researcher in paragraph 3) A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los Angeles, California September 11, 2014. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (Reuters Health) - In a head-to-head comparison over 15 years, diet and exercise outperformed the drug metformin in preventing people at high risk for diabetes from developing the disease. Metformin, which helps control blood sugar and can be used alone or in combination with insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, also lowered the risk of developing the disorder in the study group, just not as much as making healthy lifestyle changes did. The lifestyle intervention was more powerful in preventing or delaying diabetes development during the original three-year Diabetes Prevention Program and remains more powerful over the entire 15-year study, said professor David M. Nathan of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, a coauthor of the new paper. However, there are specific subgroups in which the lifestyle intervention had an even more powerful effect specifically, those older than age 60, Nathan told Reuters Health by email. Metformin was relatively more effective in people younger than 60 and those who were more obese, he said. The researchers followed up with the surviving participants of a diabetes prevention study between 1996 and 2001 that compared people randomly assigned to either an intensive lifestyle intervention or 850 milligrams of metformin twice daily and a group taking a placebo. The participants were all overweight or obese and had elevated blood sugar levels, both factors that put them at very high risk for developing d Continue reading >>

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

'Can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?' Some doctors are now prescribing this diabetes drug for weight loss. But is it safe? Metformin is a drug designed to treat patients with Type 2 diabetes, but it comes with an interesting side effect: weight loss . And Reddit is filled with stories from people who have lost weight on the drug. Was trying to lose weight for a long time with no success, one person wrote of being prescribed metformin. Im on 1000 mg a day and am down 10 pounds. I saw weight loss at first with 500 mg twice per day, another wrote. The difference was almost immediate. While some people say the drug didnt do much for them, others swear by iteven those that dont have Type 2 diabetes, saysFatima Cody Stanford, M.D., an instructor of medicine and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and obesity medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. In fact, Cody Stanford says that she often prescribes the medication to overweight or obese people who don't have Type 2 diabetes. Heres what you need to know about the drug. (Hit the reset buttonand burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet !) Metformin causes a decrease in the release of glucose from a persons liver. This helps to lower a persons blood sugar when its too high and restore the way someone uses food to make energy, according to the Mayo Clinic . " Weight loss can occur because it decreases appetite in some people who take it," says women's health expert Jennifer Wider , M.D. In order for the prescription to work effectively, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against your diet and exercise because it helps level out your blood sugar, the clinic says. For that reason, if you change your diet or exercise, you doctor may need to change the amount of metformin you take. Check Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

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