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Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Area Seniors Hear Concerns On Medication

Area Seniors Hear Concerns On Medication

During a recent Franklin County AARP meeting, members began to discuss a recent study that has linked the diabetes medication metformin to serious health diseases. A breakthrough cohort study by a Taiwanese doctor in March 2017 found that there could be a link between long-term use of metformin and an increased risk for neurodegenerative and other serious diseases. Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type-two diabetes and belongs to a class of medication called biguanides. The drug has been prescribed in Europe since the 1950s and came to the United States in 1995. Since then it has become the most widely used prescription in the world, an article from Diabetes Self-Management said. The study by Yi-Chun Kuan followed about 9,300 people with type-two diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years, and found that the risk of Parkinsons and Alzheimers dementia was more than double for those that were prescribed the long-term oral pill compared to those who were not over the 12-year period. Kuan presented her results at the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases in Vienna, Austria. Past research has shown a connection between diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, but there have been questions about the relationship with other diabetic medication. The study followed two groups of people with type-two diabetes; 4,651 people who were on metformin and a control group of 4,651 people who were not on the pill. Studies found that the risk of developing Parkinsons was 2.27 times as high and the risk of Alzheimers was 2.13 times as high in participants who took metformin, according to Diabetes Self-Managements article Metformin and Neurodegenerative Diseases. Paul Swecker, a Franklin County resident and member of the countys AARP chapter, has battl Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinson's Disease In Diabetes, Study Suggests

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinson's Disease In Diabetes, Study Suggests

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Metformin can substantially reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease in diabetes, study suggests A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease more than twofold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57 percent. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinson's disease was recorded. A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease more than 2-fold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57%. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinson's disease was recorded. Metformin, found in the French lilac, "Galega officinalis," was originally used in traditional European medicine, and introduced into France and Britain in the 1950s for the treatment of diabetes. It has a long and relatively safe record, is off patent and relatively inexpensive. Professor Mark Wahlqvist, lead author of the study commented, "An exciting aspect of the finding is that metformin seems to be working to protect the brain against neurodegeneration which contributes to Parkinsonismin. This means it may also be considered a relevant therapy for the prevention of dementia as well." While much needs to be done to understand the mechanism behind metformin's workings, a re-setting of the regulation of energy metabolism in cells, including the brain, probably takes place. Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Does Not Help Beat Cognitive Impairment As Previously Thought

Metformin Use Does Not Help Beat Cognitive Impairment As Previously Thought

Metformin use does not help beat cognitive impairment as previously thought Metformin use does not help beat cognitive impairment as previously thought Omega-3 fatty acids shown to reverse islet autoimmunity in mice 05 April 2017 A new large-scale study has found that long-term metformin use does not help slow down cognitive decline in diseases of the aging brain. The findings are of importance because diabetes is a risk factor for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and metformin , the first-line drug treatment for type 2 diabetes , may affect an important aspect of cognitive impairment in older adults. Scientists knew that having decreased insulin sensitivity negatively impacts memory formation and prevents insulin from doing its job, including preventing the build-up of plaque in Alzheimer's disease. Some studies hinted that short-term use of metformin might actually protect from cognitive impairment as the treatment helps correct insulin issues and promotes the formation of new neurons. This new research, however, suggests that this protective effect from metformin may be true only for a limited period of time. After following a total of 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes for 12 years, Taiwanese researchers at Taipei Medical University found that long-term metformin increased the risk of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease . The study showed that the longer a patient used metformin, here for more than 300 days and at doses greater than 240g, the higher the odds of developing these diseases later in life. In fact, the risk for Parkinsons disease or Alzheimers dementia went up over 50 per cent during a 12-year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. The higher incidences of Parkinsons and Alzheimer's dementia were still signif Continue reading >>

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-Term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks Metformin is the mainstay of conventional treatment for type 2 diabetes. It is generally considered to be the safest antidiabetic drug around and because the patent on metformin for blood sugar control ran out years ago, Big Pharma is desperate to find new and lucrative uses for it. Metformin has already been suggested as a preventive therapy for cancer, as an anti-ageing drug and as a treatment for tuberculosis. Some studies have also shown that metformin may help prevent cognitive decline, causing it to be touted as a potential anti-dementia drug. So, the recent finding that long-term use of metformin could substantially increase the risks of both Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases must have caused some consternation in the drug industry. In a study yet to be published, researchers in Taiwan followed 9,300 type 2 diabetes patients for 12 years, making this the largest and longest study of its kind.1They saw rates of Parkinsons disease and Alzheimers disease increase with metformin daily dosage and length of use. And the link remained strong after adjusting for participants age, gender and diabetes severity. In fact, the risks of these deadly conditions more than doubled over the 12-year period in those who took metformin, compared to those who did not. As I mentioned, this finding is at odds with earlier, shorter studies that suggested metformin could have a protective effect against Alzheimers. Because of these conflicting findings, further research is needed to establish exactly how metformin affects the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in the long term. But the new study provides another good reason to be very wary of this wonder drug. Thats on top of metformins risks of congestive heart failu Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Home / Specialties / Geriatric Medicine / Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Study finds connection between duration of therapy in senior patients and development of neurodegenerative disease. In 2011, the Journal of Alzheimers Disease published the findings of a large Taiwanese study showing a protective effect against development of dementia in diabetes patients who were given oral antidiabetic agents. The cohort of over 100,000 subjects included patients over 50 with type 2 diabetes, who were free of dementia at initiation, and received either or both metformin and a sulfonylurea. The results suggested that while T2D carries a two-fold increase in the risk of dementia, use of metformin, sulfonylureas, or both can reduce the risk by up to 35% over eight years. Medscape recently reported that at AD/PD 2017 (the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases), a group of Taiwanese neurologists presented the results of their own study looking at possible risk increases for Alzheimers and Parkinsons in people with type 2 diabetes, citing uncertainty about the effects of metformin on the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Utilizing the National Health Insurance research database in Taiwan, 4,651 diabetes patients who had prescriptions for metformin were selected, along with an identically sized, matched control group of patients not taking metformin. Although the statistical methods were not made available at the time of this writing, the findings were rather striking. Patients were retrospectively followed over a 12-year period. With regards to Parkinsons disease, the event rate in metformin users was 6.85% (n=318) vs. non-users at 2.7 Continue reading >>

Metformin Might Cut Risk Of Alzheimers, Parkinsons

Metformin Might Cut Risk Of Alzheimers, Parkinsons

Metformin Might Cut Risk of Alzheimers, Parkinsons A large study finds those taking the drug for four years or more saw their risk of being diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease lowered by 76%. New research out of Tulane University seems to suggest that metformin could be a tool to help combat Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, and dementia. Researchers found that those taking metformin for two years or more enjoyed a substantial reduction in the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, according to PhD candidate Qian Shi. Based on these findings, its possible that prolonged use of metformin could potentially protect the neurons in the brain from degradation, said Shi, a research assistant at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, who was speaking at the 2016 ADA Scientific Sessions. In a series of studies, Shi and others examined data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to compare neurodegenerative disease rates among metformin users and those not taking metformin. In the final study , 6,046 patients receiving treatment were followed from diagnosis until death or the conclusion of the study. Overall, participants were studied for an average of 5.25 years. For those not taking metformin, the reported incidence of developing a neurodegenerative disease was 2.08 per 100 individuals. That rate plummeted for metformin users those on metformin for two to four years had a diagnosis rate of just 1.30 per 100, and those taking it for four years or more had a diagnosis rate of just .49 per 100. The precise reasons metformin could protect the brain remain unclear, but researchers do know the drug is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. While this sounds like great news, it may be too early to administer metformin to all older Ameri Continue reading >>

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

A recent study found that the use of metformin in people with diabetes increased their risk for developing dementia and Parkinson’s Disease. This may be surprising as not too long ago, we reported on a different study which found the opposite–that using metformin might lower the risk for dementia in older men. The study from Taiwanese researchers was presented on March 29, 2017 at The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases in Vienna Austria by Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan from the Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The researchers found that long-term use of metformin may raise the risk of neurodegenerative disease in those with type 2 diabetes. How Harmful Might Metformin Be to the Brain? As reported by Medscape Medical News, Yi-Chun Kuan and team conducted a cohort study to follow a total 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. They checked records for these patients from the National Health research database of Taiwan including 4,651 who had metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who didn’t take any metformin. Dr. Kuan told Medscape they adjusted for age, sex, and diabetes severity and that despite this, “the cumulative incidences of Parkinson’s and dementia were significantly higher for our metformin cohort” at 12 years. In fact, the risk for Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s dementia went up over 50 percent during a 12 year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. Researchers also found that “outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment.” Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan said, “We’d heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse,” and she added t Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes VIENNA, Austria — Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) or Alzheimer's dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not — even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan told Medscape Medical News that "some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative ." So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. "We'd heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse," she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but there's been "some question" about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had metformin pre Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk in Patients With Diabetes Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinsons disease (PD) or Alzheimers dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan toldMedscape Medical Newsthat some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative . So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. Wed heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse, she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. AD/PD 2017: International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases. Abstract 312. Presented March 29, 2017. Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Alzheimers Dementia & Parkinsons

Metformin Linked To Alzheimers Dementia & Parkinsons

METFORMIN LINKED TO ALZHEIMERS DEMENTIA & PARKINSONS VIENNA, Austria Long-term use of the diabetes medication Metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinsons disease (PD) or Alzheimers dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took Metformin vs those who did not even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly,recent researchhas suggested that use of Metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan toldMedscape Medical Newsthat some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have beennegative. So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. Wed heard about a possible protective effect from Metformin. However, we found the reverse, she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but theres been some question about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had Metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who were not using the Continue reading >>

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Most of the 20 million people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. take metformin to help control their blood glucose. The drug is ultrasafe: millions of diabetics have taken it for decades with few side effects beyond gastrointestinal discomfort. And it is ultracheap: a month's supply costs $4 at Walmart. And now new studies hint that metformin might help protect the brain from developing diseases of aging, even in nondiabetics. Diabetes is a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, but using metformin is associated with a dramatic reduction in their incidence. In the most comprehensive study yet of metformin's cognitive effects, Qian Shi and her colleagues at Tulane University followed 6,000 diabetic veterans and showed that the longer a patient used metformin, the lower the individual's chances of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and other types of dementia and cognitive impairment. In line with some of the previous, smaller studies of long-term metformin use, patients in the new study who used the drug longer than four years had one quarter the rate of disease as compared with patients who used only insulin or insulin plus other antidiabetic drugs—bringing diabetics' risk level to that of the general population. The findings were presented in June at the American Diabetes Association's Scientific Sessions meeting. Even in the absence of diabetes, Alzheimer's patients often have decreased insulin sensitivity in the brain, says Suzanne Craft, a neuroscientist who studies insulin resistance in neurodegenerative disease at the Wake Forest School of Medicine. The association has led some people to call Alzheimer's “type 3 diabetes.” Insulin plays many roles in the brain—it is involved in memory formation, and it helps to keep synapses Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes - Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes - Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes There are also studies that link high blood sugar to dementia, so you're kinda stuck either way. I found another article that describes it this way: Not linking the site because it has those "COMPLETELY REVERSE DIABETES!" ads on it. So is it the B12 deficiency that is the issue? And is supplements a simple solution? No long term study on supplements. :( Probably couldn't hurt. But they won't help. One of the few negative side effects of metformin is that it blocks the ability to get B12 from the digestive tract. Supplements won't help. The solution is a B12 injection or possibly calcium supplements because the calcium allows the body to absorb B12 despite the metformin. The ADA recommendations are for periodic B12 checks for users on metformin. The body has large stores of B12, but eventually it will deplete those. Of course, someone posts this THE VERY DAY I fill my first metformin prescription! I'll give a go anyway. I think it'll help me fix some of my insulin quirks. Continue reading >>

New Taiwan Study Contradicts Earlier Findings On Metformins Neurodegenerative Disease Protective Effect

New Taiwan Study Contradicts Earlier Findings On Metformins Neurodegenerative Disease Protective Effect

A Taiwanese study presented yesterday at an international conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases suggested that long-term use of the popular diabetes medication Metformin may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, contradicting the results of a large study published just last year following US-based subjects that seemed to show that Metformin exerts a protective effect against the same diseases. According to separate coverage of these studies in Medscape Medical News, both were large scale longitudinal research projects; the Taiwan one followed 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years, while the US study followed 6,046 patients (over 90% male) for a median of 5.25 years. The two studies findings could not be more contradictory. The data from Taiwan showed the risk for Parkinsons disease or Alzheimers dementia more than doubling during a 12-year period for those who took Metformin compared with those who did not, factoring in for multiple confounders. And these risks increased with higher dosage and the length of time on Metformin treatment. The US study in contrast showed that for Metformin exposure longer than two years a significant reduction in neurodegenerative disease was found, according to a June 11, 2016 report in the study in Medscape Medical News. The study from Taiwan adds to the confusion around claims of additional benefits of Metformin beyond its approved use as a blood glucose controller. Interest in these benefits came off the back of a 2014 UK study led by Cardiff University of more than 180,000 people that showed patients with diabetes given the drug lived 15 percent longer than others without the condition. As reported by The Telegraph newspaper at the time these res Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Reports new study in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders Amsterdam, April 16, 2012 - A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinsons disease more than 2-fold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57%. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinsons disease was recorded. Metformin, found in the French lilac, Galega officinalis, was originally used in traditional European medicine, and introduced into France and Britain in the 1950s for the treatment of diabetes. It has a long and relatively safe record, is off patent and relatively inexpensive. Professor Mark Wahlqvist, lead author of the study commented, An exciting aspect of the finding is that metformin seems to be working to protect the brain against neurodegeneration which contributes to Parkinsonismin. This means it may also be considered a relevant therapy for the prevention of dementia as well. While much needs to be done to understand the mechanism behind metformins workings, a re-setting of the regulation of energy metabolism in cells, including the brain, probably takes place. A similar benefit would be expected from exercise and diet because that too is a way of establishing healthy energy regulation not only for the whole body, but for tissues and cells in the brain. It appears that metformin has opened new ways to look at major diseases of modern society and how we may reduce the growing burdens of such diseases. Unlike other trea Continue reading >>

Metformin And Neurodegenerative Diseases

Metformin And Neurodegenerative Diseases

Its one of the most widely used prescription drugs in the world, hailed for its ability to lower blood glucose levels, impressive safety profile, and low cost. Metformin the first-line oral drug for Type 2 diabetes has been prescribed in Europe since the 1950s and the United States since 1995, and achieved much of its formidable reputation through the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), published in 1998. But a new study may have slightly dimmed possibly just for a moment metformins bright halo. The study not yet published, but presented last week at the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases in Vienna looked at about 9,300 people with Type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. As noted in a Medscape article on the study , during the follow-up period, the risk of participants who took metformin developing Alzheimers or Parkinsons was more than twice as high as it was for those who didnt take the drug. This was true even after adjusting for certain characteristics like age and diabetes severity that might affect whether someone was taking metformin in the first place. The risk of developing Parkinsons disease, in particular, was 2.27 times as high in participants who took metformin as in those who didnt. The risk of dementia from all causes was 1.66 times as high, and the risk of Alzheimers in particular was 2.13 times as high. Overall, taking a higher dose of metformin and taking it for a longer duration were both associated with a higher risk of developing one of the measured conditions. For example, taking metformin for less than 180 days was associated with a 1.77-times-as-high risk of Parkinsons, while taking the drug for 400 days or longer was associated with a 4.49-times-as-high risk of Parkinsons. Similarly, taking metformin fo Continue reading >>

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