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Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes - Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk In Patients With Diabetes - Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes There are also studies that link high blood sugar to dementia, so you're kinda stuck either way. I found another article that describes it this way: Not linking the site because it has those "COMPLETELY REVERSE DIABETES!" ads on it. So is it the B12 deficiency that is the issue? And is supplements a simple solution? No long term study on supplements. :( Probably couldn't hurt. But they won't help. One of the few negative side effects of metformin is that it blocks the ability to get B12 from the digestive tract. Supplements won't help. The solution is a B12 injection or possibly calcium supplements because the calcium allows the body to absorb B12 despite the metformin. The ADA recommendations are for periodic B12 checks for users on metformin. The body has large stores of B12, but eventually it will deplete those. Of course, someone posts this THE VERY DAY I fill my first metformin prescription! I'll give a go anyway. I think it'll help me fix some of my insulin quirks. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Dementia Risk

Metformin And Dementia Risk

Recently in Vienna (Austria) an international conference has been taking place on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease. As I am unable to attend the conference in person I have been following the reports on Medscape (a news site for doctors and health professionals). One particular report [1] relating to a poster presented by a Taiwanese team caught my attention. They presented a poster which suggested that Metformin, one of the commonest drugs used to treat Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), may increase the risk of dementias. This is frequently the kind of news that the media likes to cherry pick and create sensationalist headlines with. As a result of that I wanted to briefly discuss these "findings" and caution against people reading too much into them. It is very preliminary research and in view of that it needs to be taken in the appropriate context. The study was presented in the form of a poster. This is exactly what it sounds like - it is a large sheet (often made of card) which contains a summary of research. Posters are often presented at conferences - they have a variety of uses but one of these is presenting early or preliminary research findings for discussion and commentary prior to being ready for publication. For this reason the amount of information on view is limited compared to a formal paper. According to the Medscape report which you can find here (but I'm not sure if it is accessible to non-clinicians) the group carried out a cohort study on 9300 patients with Type II diabetes (T2DM). This means that people with T2DM were selected and followed up for a period of time to see if they developed a particular disease. In this case they were followed up for up to 12 years to see if they developed Alzheimer's Disease (AD) or Parkinson's Disease (PD). Of p Continue reading >>

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

A recent study found that the use of metformin in people with diabetes increased their risk for developing dementia and Parkinson’s Disease. This may be surprising as not too long ago, we reported on a different study which found the opposite–that using metformin might lower the risk for dementia in older men. The study from Taiwanese researchers was presented on March 29, 2017 at The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases in Vienna Austria by Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan from the Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The researchers found that long-term use of metformin may raise the risk of neurodegenerative disease in those with type 2 diabetes. How Harmful Might Metformin Be to the Brain? As reported by Medscape Medical News, Yi-Chun Kuan and team conducted a cohort study to follow a total 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. They checked records for these patients from the National Health research database of Taiwan including 4,651 who had metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who didn’t take any metformin. Dr. Kuan told Medscape they adjusted for age, sex, and diabetes severity and that despite this, “the cumulative incidences of Parkinson’s and dementia were significantly higher for our metformin cohort” at 12 years. In fact, the risk for Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s dementia went up over 50 percent during a 12 year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. Researchers also found that “outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment.” Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan said, “We’d heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse,” and she added t Continue reading >>

New Taiwan Study Contradicts Earlier Findings On Metformins Neurodegenerative Disease Protective Effect

New Taiwan Study Contradicts Earlier Findings On Metformins Neurodegenerative Disease Protective Effect

A Taiwanese study presented yesterday at an international conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases suggested that long-term use of the popular diabetes medication Metformin may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, contradicting the results of a large study published just last year following US-based subjects that seemed to show that Metformin exerts a protective effect against the same diseases. According to separate coverage of these studies in Medscape Medical News, both were large scale longitudinal research projects; the Taiwan one followed 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years, while the US study followed 6,046 patients (over 90% male) for a median of 5.25 years. The two studies findings could not be more contradictory. The data from Taiwan showed the risk for Parkinsons disease or Alzheimers dementia more than doubling during a 12-year period for those who took Metformin compared with those who did not, factoring in for multiple confounders. And these risks increased with higher dosage and the length of time on Metformin treatment. The US study in contrast showed that for Metformin exposure longer than two years a significant reduction in neurodegenerative disease was found, according to a June 11, 2016 report in the study in Medscape Medical News. The study from Taiwan adds to the confusion around claims of additional benefits of Metformin beyond its approved use as a blood glucose controller. Interest in these benefits came off the back of a 2014 UK study led by Cardiff University of more than 180,000 people that showed patients with diabetes given the drug lived 15 percent longer than others without the condition. As reported by The Telegraph newspaper at the time these res Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Alzheimers Dementia & Parkinsons

Metformin Linked To Alzheimers Dementia & Parkinsons

METFORMIN LINKED TO ALZHEIMERS DEMENTIA & PARKINSONS VIENNA, Austria Long-term use of the diabetes medication Metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinsons disease (PD) or Alzheimers dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took Metformin vs those who did not even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly,recent researchhas suggested that use of Metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan toldMedscape Medical Newsthat some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have beennegative. So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. Wed heard about a possible protective effect from Metformin. However, we found the reverse, she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but theres been some question about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had Metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who were not using the Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease I need your input. This report got me worried enough to make me stop taking my daily dose of 1000 mg. Glumetza, extended release metformin. here are the links I wouldnt take it too seriouslysounds like the methods of the study were questionable, and other evidence suggests metformin has several beneficial longterm effects. These results were only presented at a conference so far (and lots of questionable science gets into conferences), so Id wait to see if it actually survives peer review (and if so, what it really looks like then) before making treatment decisions based on it. I wouldnt worry too much about this studys findings. These paragraphs contain reasonable expert skepticism. When asked for comment, Larry Ereshefsky, PharmD, with Follow the Molecule consulting group, Los Angeles, California, told Medscape Medical News that he was very surprised and skeptical about the results. He noted that the poster didnt explain how the investigators controlled for the confounders and didnt mention anything about alternative treatments for T2DM or hemoglobin A1c levels between the groups, which would affect the analyses. Its interesting and I would like to know more but I dont believe the findings based on whats up there, said Dr Ereshefsky, who was formerly a psychiatry and pharmacology professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio. Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Home / Specialties / Geriatric Medicine / Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Study finds connection between duration of therapy in senior patients and development of neurodegenerative disease. In 2011, the Journal of Alzheimers Disease published the findings of a large Taiwanese study showing a protective effect against development of dementia in diabetes patients who were given oral antidiabetic agents. The cohort of over 100,000 subjects included patients over 50 with type 2 diabetes, who were free of dementia at initiation, and received either or both metformin and a sulfonylurea. The results suggested that while T2D carries a two-fold increase in the risk of dementia, use of metformin, sulfonylureas, or both can reduce the risk by up to 35% over eight years. Medscape recently reported that at AD/PD 2017 (the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases), a group of Taiwanese neurologists presented the results of their own study looking at possible risk increases for Alzheimers and Parkinsons in people with type 2 diabetes, citing uncertainty about the effects of metformin on the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Utilizing the National Health Insurance research database in Taiwan, 4,651 diabetes patients who had prescriptions for metformin were selected, along with an identically sized, matched control group of patients not taking metformin. Although the statistical methods were not made available at the time of this writing, the findings were rather striking. Patients were retrospectively followed over a 12-year period. With regards to Parkinsons disease, the event rate in metformin users was 6.85% (n=318) vs. non-users at 2.7 Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinsons disease (PD) or Alzheimers dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly,recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan toldMedscape Medical Newsthat some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative . So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. Wed heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse, she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but theres been some question about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who were not using the medication. After adjustment for factors such as age, sex, and dia Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked To Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk In Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinsons Risk in Patients With Diabetes Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinsons disease (PD) or Alzheimers dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan toldMedscape Medical Newsthat some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative . So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. Wed heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse, she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. AD/PD 2017: International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases. Abstract 312. Presented March 29, 2017. Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Reports new study in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders Amsterdam, April 16, 2012 - A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinsons disease more than 2-fold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57%. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinsons disease was recorded. Metformin, found in the French lilac, Galega officinalis, was originally used in traditional European medicine, and introduced into France and Britain in the 1950s for the treatment of diabetes. It has a long and relatively safe record, is off patent and relatively inexpensive. Professor Mark Wahlqvist, lead author of the study commented, An exciting aspect of the finding is that metformin seems to be working to protect the brain against neurodegeneration which contributes to Parkinsonismin. This means it may also be considered a relevant therapy for the prevention of dementia as well. While much needs to be done to understand the mechanism behind metformins workings, a re-setting of the regulation of energy metabolism in cells, including the brain, probably takes place. A similar benefit would be expected from exercise and diet because that too is a way of establishing healthy energy regulation not only for the whole body, but for tissues and cells in the brain. It appears that metformin has opened new ways to look at major diseases of modern society and how we may reduce the growing burdens of such diseases. Unlike other trea Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinson's Disease In Diabetes, Study Suggests

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinson's Disease In Diabetes, Study Suggests

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Metformin can substantially reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease in diabetes, study suggests A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease more than twofold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57 percent. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinson's disease was recorded. A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease more than 2-fold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57%. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinson's disease was recorded. Metformin, found in the French lilac, "Galega officinalis," was originally used in traditional European medicine, and introduced into France and Britain in the 1950s for the treatment of diabetes. It has a long and relatively safe record, is off patent and relatively inexpensive. Professor Mark Wahlqvist, lead author of the study commented, "An exciting aspect of the finding is that metformin seems to be working to protect the brain against neurodegeneration which contributes to Parkinsonismin. This means it may also be considered a relevant therapy for the prevention of dementia as well." While much needs to be done to understand the mechanism behind metformin's workings, a re-setting of the regulation of energy metabolism in cells, including the brain, probably takes place. Continue reading >>

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-Term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks Metformin is the mainstay of conventional treatment for type 2 diabetes. It is generally considered to be the safest antidiabetic drug around and because the patent on metformin for blood sugar control ran out years ago, Big Pharma is desperate to find new and lucrative uses for it. Metformin has already been suggested as a preventive therapy for cancer, as an anti-ageing drug and as a treatment for tuberculosis. Some studies have also shown that metformin may help prevent cognitive decline, causing it to be touted as a potential anti-dementia drug. So, the recent finding that long-term use of metformin could substantially increase the risks of both Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases must have caused some consternation in the drug industry. In a study yet to be published, researchers in Taiwan followed 9,300 type 2 diabetes patients for 12 years, making this the largest and longest study of its kind.1They saw rates of Parkinsons disease and Alzheimers disease increase with metformin daily dosage and length of use. And the link remained strong after adjusting for participants age, gender and diabetes severity. In fact, the risks of these deadly conditions more than doubled over the 12-year period in those who took metformin, compared to those who did not. As I mentioned, this finding is at odds with earlier, shorter studies that suggested metformin could have a protective effect against Alzheimers. Because of these conflicting findings, further research is needed to establish exactly how metformin affects the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in the long term. But the new study provides another good reason to be very wary of this wonder drug. Thats on top of metformins risks of congestive heart failu Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes VIENNA, Austria — Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) or Alzheimer's dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not — even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan told Medscape Medical News that "some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative ." So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. "We'd heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse," she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but there's been "some question" about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had metformin pre Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Exposure On Neurodegenerative Diseases In Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Effects Of Metformin Exposure On Neurodegenerative Diseases In Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2017 Oct 3;79(Pt B):77-83. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.06.002. Epub 2017 Jun 3. Effects of metformin exposure on neurodegenerative diseases in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan; Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Beitou Health Management Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan. Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: [email protected] Epidemiological evidence reveals that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), including dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD). The effects of metformin exposure on dementia and PD risk in patients with T2DM are unknown. We evaluated the effects of metformin exposure on the risk of dementia and PD in patients Continue reading >>

Long-term Metformin Use Protective Against Neurodegenerative Disease

Long-term Metformin Use Protective Against Neurodegenerative Disease

Long-term Metformin Use Protective Against Neurodegenerative Disease Doug Brunk, Family Practice News Digital Network Key clinical point: Use of metformin for at least 2 years was protective against the onset of neurodegenerative disease. Major finding: The adjusted incidence rates of neurodegenerative disease ranged from 2.47 cases per 100 person-years for those treated with metformin for less than 1 year to 0.49 cases per 100 person-years for those treated for 4 years or longer. Data source: A longitudinal study of 6,046 patients at least 50 years of age with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were receiving long-term insulin treatment. Disclosures: The researchers reported having no relevant financial disclosures. NEW ORLEANS The use of metformin for at least 2 years had a protective effect on the incidence of neurodegenerative disease among elderly veterans, according to results from a large analysis of Veterans Affairs data. At the annual scientific sessions of the American Diabetes Association, lead study author Qian Shi said that according to the current medical literature, diabetes increases ones risk of Alzheimers disease (by 1.46- to 1.56-fold), all types of dementia (by 1.51- to 1.73-fold), vascular dementia (by 2.27- to 2.48-fold), and mild cognitive impairment (by 1.21-fold). Metformin can cross the blood-brain barrier having specific effects on the central nervous system. But the exact mechanism and sites of its action remain unknown, and there are conflicting results, said Ms. Shi, a PhD candidate in the department of global health policy and management at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans. In an effort to examine the impact of receiving metformin treatment on the incidence of neurodegenerative disease and the associa Continue reading >>

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