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Metformin Twice A Day

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am on two 500 mg. Metformin twice a day. I'm unsure of when to take them, as I've read so many different things. Some people take them before eating, some after. The thing that most concerns me is what time of day should I be taking them? My bottle just says two twice day. Is it best to take them with breakfast early in the a.m. (I eat at 7:00 a.m.) and then wait until dinner (which varies for me--I don't eat "dinner" at a set time, but it is usually around 4 p.m. or so). When do YOU take Metforming (if that is the drug you are using). Thanks for any advice you can give. I've been taking Metformin earlier in the day (around 3 p.m.) and I eat snacks before bed (low carb), and also oftentimes take p.m. pain meds. I have found that my morning glucose reading is often too high (137-140). I can't sleep if my stomach is growling, so I have to eat something before I can sleep! It actually becomes a fairly personal thing as to when it suits you best to take your Metformin and depends on a few things. Some people experience gastric side effects for the first few weeks of taking Metformin, this can range from cramps, wind to diarrhea - for people who experience this, often the advice is to eat something before take the Metformin - the instruction from the Doctor can be "Take with food", which can be translated as don't take it on an empty stomach. I personally was very lucky and had no issues and so that didn't apply to me (I'm on the same dose as you). I generally don't eat breakfast, but take my Metformin just before leaving the house for work in the morning, or at weekends when I get up. The eveni Continue reading >>

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

You may recall that I recently wrote a series on various medicines and how they can affect your diabetes (see "The Ups and Downs of Meds and Diabetes [Part 1]" as well as Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5). One kind reader, who happens to be a nurse, asked me to devote a post to metformin with regard to its effects on kidneys and special considerations to keep in mind with this drug. I wrote about metformin back in December 2006 (was it that long ago?) and its link to vitamin B12 deficiency (see “Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency”). But there are other important facts to know about this very popular diabetes drug. Raise your hand if you take metformin. OK, obviously I can’t see you, but I’ll wager that many of you reading this are on this medication. Metformin is the generic name for Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. It also comes combined with other diabetes medications, including glyburide (in Glucovance), glipizide (in Metaglip), rosiglitazone (in Avandamet), pioglitazone (in Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (in Janumet), and repaglinide (in PrandiMet). I’ve read that approximately 35 million prescriptions were written for metformin in 2006, making this one of the top 10 best selling generic drugs. And you may not be aware that the American Diabetes Association, in its 2006 practice guidelines for health-care professionals, recommended metformin over sulfonylureas as the first drug of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. This really isn’t surprising. Metformin has a long track record for being safe and causing relatively few serious side effects—plus, it also works! Chances are, if you have Type 2 diabetes and need to start on medication, your health-care provider will recommend you take metformin. How It Works Just a Continue reading >>

Metformin 750 Mg Twice A Day

Metformin 750 Mg Twice A Day

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Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The extended-release formulation of metformin (MXR) prolongs drug absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract and permits once-daily dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This newer formulation may enhance patient compliance with oral therapy compared to conventional immediate-release metformin (MIR) in T2DM. OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether a switch from thrice daily MIR to once or twice daily MXR wouldachieve comparable degrees of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: We conducted an open study of the efficacy and tolerability of MXR in 40 patients with T2DM who had achieved moderate or good glycemic control with MIR alone or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. After a lead in period of 3 months patients were switched over to a specific brand of MIR at baseline (Visit 0). Patients were subsequently followed for 4 more visits. These visits were done monthly, after taking MIR in a dose of 1-2 g/day (Visit 1); MXR as a single dose at dinner but 0.5 g less than baseline dose of MIR (Visit 2); MXR, 1-2 g/day as a single dose at bedtime, with strength same as that of baseline dose of MIR (Visit 3); and MXR, 1-2 g/day in two divided doses keeping dose same as baseline MIR (Visit 4). Glycemic control was assessed by a four-point glucose profile (fasting and three postprandial levels) at each visit. RESULTS: At visit 2, when patients had been on 500 mg lesser dose of MXR for 1 month, glucose profile worsened. However, glycemic control, at visit 3, returned to earlier levels when dose of MXR was increased back to original dose. Overall the MXR formulation was well tolerated with minor gastrointestinal adverse effects, reported by only 3 patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM who had Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a novel extended-release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Adults with type 2 diabetes (newly diagnosed, treated with diet and exercise only, or previously treated with oral diabetic medications) were randomly assigned to receive one of three extended-release metformin treatment regimens (1,500 mg/day q.d., 1,500 mg/day twice daily, or 2,000 mg/day q.d.) or immediate-release metformin (1,500 mg/day twice daily) in a double-blind 24-week trial. RESULTS—Significant decreases (P < 0.001) in mean HbA1c (A1C) levels were observed by week 12 in all treatment groups. The mean changes from baseline to end point in the two groups given 1,500 mg extended-release metformin (−0.73 and −0.74%) were not significantly different from the change in the immediate-release metformin group (−0.70%), whereas the 2,000-mg extended-release metformin group showed a greater decrease in A1C levels (−1.06%; mean difference [2,000 mg extended-release metformin − immediate-release metformin]: −0.36 [98.4% CI −0.65 to −0.06]). Rapid decreases in fasting plasma glucose levels were observed by week 1, which continued until week 8, and were maintained for the duration of the study. The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for all treatment groups, but fewer patients in the extended-release metformin groups discontinued treatment due to nausea during the initial dosing period than in the immediate-release metformin group. CONCLUSIONS—Once- or twice-daily extended-release metformin was as safe and effective as twice-daily immediate-release metformin and provided continued glycemic control for up to 24 weeks of treatment. Metformin hydrochloride has been w Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

'Can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?' Some doctors are now prescribing this diabetes drug for weight loss. But is it safe? Metformin is a drug designed to treat patients with Type 2 diabetes, but it comes with an interesting side effect: weight loss . And Reddit is filled with stories from people who have lost weight on the drug. Was trying to lose weight for a long time with no success, one person wrote of being prescribed metformin. Im on 1000 mg a day and am down 10 pounds. I saw weight loss at first with 500 mg twice per day, another wrote. The difference was almost immediate. While some people say the drug didnt do much for them, others swear by iteven those that dont have Type 2 diabetes, saysFatima Cody Stanford, M.D., an instructor of medicine and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and obesity medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. In fact, Cody Stanford says that she often prescribes the medication to overweight or obese people who don't have Type 2 diabetes. Heres what you need to know about the drug. (Hit the reset buttonand burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet !) Metformin causes a decrease in the release of glucose from a persons liver. This helps to lower a persons blood sugar when its too high and restore the way someone uses food to make energy, according to the Mayo Clinic . " Weight loss can occur because it decreases appetite in some people who take it," says women's health expert Jennifer Wider , M.D. In order for the prescription to work effectively, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against your diet and exercise because it helps level out your blood sugar, the clinic says. For that reason, if you change your diet or exercise, you doctor may need to change the amount of metformin you take. Check Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Best Time To Take Metformin Lets Find Out

Best Time To Take Metformin Lets Find Out

For this reason, type II diabetes sufferers should familiarize themselves with the right medications and treatment solutions, to help keep blood sugar at the appropriate levels. Metformin is one such drug used to help maintain proper blood sugar levels. Below we will detail how to use the medication, possible complications/side effects, why type II sufferers should use it, and detail how the medication works to help maintain blood sugar levels, in conjunction with proper diet/exercise regimen. Metformin is a prescription drug which is primarily used to help type II diabetes sufferers maintain proper blood sugar levels. The prescription can be used on its own, or in some cases doctors might prescribe additional medications to help in treating type II diabetes. Metformin is often prescribed as the first-step, in treating type II diabetes. The reason being is that it directly targets the cause of diabetes (which is your inability to produce insulin to offset the sugars you consume on a daily basis). Sufferers of type II diabetes arent capable of producing insulin to offset sugars. This means the instant they consume carbs (or sugary foods), their blood sugar levels spike. Metformin helps the body metabolize the carbs (sugary substance) which in turn helps regulate blood sugar levels, and helps maintain stability in your body. Another issue which Metformin targets is the decrease of glucose production in the liver. By decreasing glucose levels, this helps lower glucose levels in the bloodstream and also helps change the manner in which your bodys blood cells react to insulin in the future. Insulin is transported through the system more efficiently. This eliminates the spikes in blood sugar levels, and helps stabilize liver enzymes, naturally stabilizing your body. Although Continue reading >>

Metformin Dosage

Metformin Dosage

There have been no human studies to identify the optimal dose of metformin that is needed to duplicate the beneficial gene expression effects that are described in the June 2003 issue of Life Extension magazine . For people who want to derive the many proven health benefits of metformin, it might be prudent to follow the dosage schedule used by Type II diabetics. According to the Physician's Desk Reference, the starting dose should be 500 mg of metformin twice a day. (An alternative option is 850 mg of metformin once a day). After one week, increase the dose of metformin to 1000 mg as the first dose of the day and 500 mg as the second dose. After another week, increase to 1000 mg of metformin two times a day. The maximum safe dose described in the Physician's Desk Reference is 2550 mg a day (which should be taken as 850 mg three times a day). According to the Physician's Desk Reference, clinically significant responses in Type II diabetics are not seen at doses below 1500 mg a day of metformin. Anti-aging doctors, on the other hand, have recommended doses as low as 500 mg twice a day to healthy non-diabetics who are seeking to obtain metformin's other proven benefits such as enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing excess levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. It could be the dosage range is highly individualistic in healthy people, meaning some may benefit from 500 mg twice a day, while others may need 1000 mg twice a day for optimal effects. Blood tests to ascertain if the dose of metformin you are taking is improving glucose/insulin metabolism would be: Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Generic Name: metformin (met FOR min) Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use metformin if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to metformin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking this medicine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Common metformin side effects may include: low blood sugar; nausea, upset stomach; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doc Continue reading >>

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