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Metformin Stomach Problems

Metformin And The Stomach Issues That Go Along W... | Diabetic Connect

Metformin And The Stomach Issues That Go Along W... | Diabetic Connect

A friend told me something that was really helpful: Metformin needs LARGE amounts of water and HATES anything buttery or greasy. That's helped me out a LOT when dealing with the fun side-effects of Met. However, I will say that I ended up having to a slow-step-up on my Met dosage (I cut the pills in half and took basically a half-dose for about 2 weeks before going to a 3/4 dose for another week then finally going to a full dose/day [2 pills]). I still have some problems, but not nearly what I was having and only when I eat certain foods. That list you're on is kind of insane, but I hope it works for your BGs. I'm starting Junuvia on Sunday with the Met. Will let ya know how it goes. They made a wholesale change in my meds yesterday. They took me off of the Invokamet and put me on Invokana and Metformin plus a once a week shot called Trulicity. And added Crestor and something for triglycerides. I find that getting adequate FIBER at least 20 grams a daymore if you candoes a great deal to mitigate the GI effects of Metfartin. I still get the fart attacks now and then, but not the explosive problem you are probably having at the moment. I am with these guys, I believe your stomach trouble will eventually calm down. I had that trouble to at first, I think most people do when they start metformin . It can frequently take a couple of weeks to adjust. If you find that it is to difficult to continue, maybe you can have your doctor temporarily lower your dose. Depends on what dosage you were started at. Stomach issues were immediate for me when I started taking it. After maybe 2 months I somewhat adjusted and switched over to the XR version. Took myself off of it in August because of the massive, massive hair loss it cursed me with. I went through the same thing you are going t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin is prescribed for some people with diabetes to help keep their blood sugar levels under control. Metformin works by encouraging the body to burn energy, leading to lower blood glucose levels. If you take metformin it is usually more effective at lowering blood glucose levels than if you are just careful about what you eat. Nausea Metformin has a number of side effects, the most common of which are gastrointestinal. More than one in 10 people who take metformin experience side effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain, increased flatulence or loss of appetite. More than one in 100 patients who take the medication experience changes to their sense of taste - usually a metallic taste. A number of other very rare symptoms have also been reported. Fewer than one in 10,000 people who take metformin may experience: What to do about side effects All medications take some getting used to. The NHS advises that patients can avoid the more common gastrointestinal side effects by taking the medication during or after a meal. In order to guard against vitamin B12 deficiency - which in rare cases becomes apparent in patients who have taken the medication for a long time - the charity Diabetes UK recommends eating a healthy, balanced diet including foods rich in vitamin B12 such as meat, dairy products and eggs. However, it is not recommended for those prescribed metformin to also take vitamin B12 supplements unless advised to by their doctor. Patients who feel unwell or who are concerned about a side effect should talk to their GP, pharmacist or practice nurse. Immediate medical attention should be sought in cases of breathing difficulties, muscle cramps, stomach pain, weakness or hypothermia, which can be symptoms of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Metformin And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Metformin And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Go to: Introduction Metformin—dimethylbiguanide—is an oral glucose-lowering agent. Its origins can be traced to Galega officinalis, also known as French lilac or goat’s rue [1]. In the early 20th century it was noted to lower blood glucose concentrations in animals, but it was not until the 1950s that Jean Sterne studied dimethylbiguanide and subsequently developed ‘Glucophage’ [2]. Over the last 15 years, metformin has become the first-line agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, as noted in several international guidelines, including the ADA-EASD guidelines [3]. Metformin has had a chequered history—it was initially eclipsed by phenformin, which was withdrawn in the late 1970s after it was discovered to be associated with lactic acidosis [4]. The lower propensity of metformin for hyperlactataemia [5] and success in several large randomised controlled clinical trials, such as the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) [6], confirmed its clinical benefit. It is widely recognised that metformin improves glycaemic control with a good safety profile, weight neutrality or weight loss, lack of associated hypoglycaemia, reduced cardiovascular mortality and low cost [3]. However, a large proportion of patients cannot tolerate the medication in adequate amounts because of its associated side effects. Up to 25% of patients suffer metformin-associated gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects, with approximately 5% unable to tolerate metformin at all [7]. In addition to this interindividual variation in side effects, there is variability in the efficacy of metformin. There are likely to be a number of factors to account for this variability in efficacy, for example, our group (Zhou et al) recently established that the glycaemic response to metformin is moderately heritabl Continue reading >>

Metformin Stomach Issues

Metformin Stomach Issues

Hi folks, I'm still experiencing stomach issues about a couple of hours after I take my dosage, although not after every dosage (I take it twice a day). Someone suggested taking Probiotic Pearls, which I just started doing. I've also taken Immodium. I started this higher dosage in early November, and I thought I would be over the stomach side effects by now. I make sure to take the dose with full meals. Anyone with other recommendations, besides Probiotic Pearls and Immodium? Thanks so much. I don't know what to say. When I had the explosive diahrrea for more than 15 hours i had to fianally defeat and go to insulin. Which is a better drug for me. Imodium just constipates for days, so I didn't do that for long. are you on the ER (extended release) version? I found that once I was switched to the ER version my issues were gone Best suggestion I can offer is call your doctor and ask for an Rx for the extended-release metformin. For many it solves the GI distress. Metformin ER is easier on my digestive system than is regular metformin but I still get diarrhea every day. I like metformin because it does not cause hypoglycemia so I take one immodium every morning. That dose stops the diarrhea but does not cause constipation. As long as I stay near a bathroom until after 9:00 AM, that works for me. "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce carbs, begin exercise, stop Lantus, stop metformin and start Victoza. A1c 6.2%-6.4% since Nov 2015. I take 3 doses of 850 each. I have only had problems a couple of times in 9 years. Try switching the timing of your doses. Also I eat Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

The Gut In Diabetes: Side Effects Of Stomach Problems

The Gut In Diabetes: Side Effects Of Stomach Problems

Many people have heard of celiac disease, gastroparesis and pancreatitis. But do you know about SBBO? It stands for “small bowel bacterial overgrowth,” and it’s characterized by a buildup of bacteria in the intestines. SBBO doesn’t usually show up on its own, but is present as a consequence of a series of other conditions, like gastroparesis, or side effects of diabetes such as gastric neuropathy. Bacterial overgrowth may be caused by a reduction in the level of acidity in the stomach and/or a loss of the wave-like contraction movements in the small bowel that propel food through the intestine. Risk Factors 1. Gastroparesis: Usually, the propulsive movement in the small intestine prevents bacteria from clinging to the intestinal walls. Gastroparesis causes the gut’s contents to stagnate, interfering with one of the gastrointestinal tract’s (GI) normal cleansing properties. 2. Using Anti-Acids: Use of anti-acids and proton pump inhibitors such as Prilosec and Nexium can reduce gastric acid secretion making it more likely that bacteria will survive the stomach environment and move into the small intestine. Symptoms Symptoms of SBBO can mimic those of other bowel disorders. Patients may experience early satiety, nausea, vomiting, secretory diarrhea, weight loss and epigastric pain. SBBO has the potential to cause significant nutrient deficiencies. In normal digestion, bile from the gall bladder mixes with dietary fat allowing the fat to be absorbed into the circulation. The overgrowth of bacteria disrupts this process, preventing the bile and fat from joining together. The unabsorbed fat causes steatorrhea (fatty diarrhea). When you don’t digest and absorb fat well, you run the risk of fat soluble vitamin deficiencies (A, D, and E) as well possibly developing Continue reading >>

Is Metformin An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Metformin An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

If your doctor has prescribed Metformin for diabetes or another use, what exactly is this medication and how does it work? What is the best way to take it to reduce side effects? What adverse effects might you experience and why is it important to be aware of these? Overview According to the American Diabetes Association Standards of Care, Metformin, if tolerated, is the preferred initial oral diabetes medication for Type 2 diabetes because it is the most effective. . The problem is that they are either not making enough insulin or the insulin they do make isn't being used efficiently. Metformin is a weight neutral medication that helps the body use insulin. Weight neutral means that it is not associated with weight gain (or loss) as are many other diabetes medications. Like all medicines, however, Metformin can produce some side effects, some of which it is important to know. How It Works , which are derived from the French lilac. Metformin helps to lower blood sugar by utilizing insulin and reducing insulin resistance (making your body more sensitive to insulin.) Many people with Type 2 diabetes carry excess weight—fat cells prevent insulin from doing its job, ultimately causing the cells to become resistant to insulin. When cells become resistant to insulin, insulin is unable to direct sugar from the bloodstream to the cells to use for energy, and instead, the sugar remains in the blood. As a result, the liver responds by making more sugar because it thinks the body needs it for fuel and the pancreas responds by making more insulin. You wind up with chaos—high blood sugars and high insulin levels. Metformin helps to restore normalcy by increasing insulin sensitivity and reducing the production of sugar made by the liver. Other Uses In addition to being used for d Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

Upset Stomach With Metformin

Upset Stomach With Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm newly diagnosed type 2 and think it likely I'll be prescribed metformin. I also suffer from IBS. I've read that it can cause stomach upset. I'm slightly worried that I might be wedded to the loo - again! Can anyone offer advice on how it may have affected them and how long any upset lasts? Every one of us is different where drugs are concerned. I never had any problems at all with Metformin as my GP increased the dosage gradually. Others have mega problems with it. Here is a link to a search for Metformin on this site. There are over 3000 mentions. If you have the time take a look. i was on metformin for a few mnths with insulin, i found i had a lot of trapped wind but never runs,i also have ibs Ouch....trapped wind is sore. That's reassuring that it didn't cause the runs - that's what I fear the most. Thanks for your reply totsy bernie.freeman Type 2 Well-Known Member I had tummy problems at first with Metformin, but I found a post on here that advised to take metformin in the middle of a meal, I did and guesss what ? no more tummy problems. Try it it may work for you too ! I have always had 'weird' bowl movements. The first time I took metformin, the night was horriffic, but then no real problems since. Hi I too am on Metformin and had few stomach problems in first few days of taking them, terrible cramps and feeling of sickness more than anything else - spoke to the nurse and she suggested taking them during or after meal rather than before and it seems to have worked for me. I too had a lot of problems with Metformin. I came off them and have tried the slow release version and I get on a lot better. Saw the Nurse today and I have to increase a Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin And Stomach Problems?

Metformin And Stomach Problems?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. For those of you on Metformin who experienced stomach issues, could you please describe them? I am on the third day of Metformin and cannot tell if my stomach problems are due to Metformin or are a continuation of the problems I've been having (for which I've been told to lay off all milk for two weeks to see if I am lactose intolerant). I'm thinking it's the latter since I'm only on 500mg of ER taken with supper, but I just don't know. I was hoping to somebody could tell me about what they experienced so I might be able to get a better idea if it's the Metformin or not. I've just started taking Metformin but I have not had any issues. I always take mine (1000 X 2 each day) just after or during a full meal. Once in the morning and at diner. Maybe it's something you should talk to your DR about? Unfortunately, the symptoms of both were about the same for me. Diarrhea & gas. I've just started taking Metformin but I have not had any issues. I always take mine (1000 X 2 each day) just after or during a full meal. Once in the morning and at diner. Maybe it's something you should talk to your DR about? My doctor already knows about it- hence the no milk for two weeks. In fact, she was reluctant to put me on Metformin because of it but after looking at my numbers decided the benefit outweighed the risk. I'm pretty sure it's not the Metformin, but I don't know what typical "stomach problems" people have with Metformin. I wish I could help but I just don't know. Maybe someone with a lot more knowledge then this newbee has advice. It's not at all uncommon to experience stomach and gastric issues when s Continue reading >>

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