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Metformin Smells Like Fish

Stinky Diabetes Drug May Result In Poor Adherence

Stinky Diabetes Drug May Result In Poor Adherence

An immediate-release form of the antidiabetic agent metformin has a dead fish odor that may cause patients to stop taking the drug, clinicians warned. Metformin is known to cause adverse gastrointestinal effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, distention, and abdominal pain. Those side effects "often necessitate discontinuing the drug," a group of physicians and pharmacists wrote in a letter published in the Feb. 17 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The olfactory side effect -- a "stinky fish" smell -- appears to have been previously unreported in medical literature, and physicians may be prone to confusing the nausea induced by the foul smell with the well-known gastrointestinal pharmacologic side effect from metformin, according to Allen L. Pelletier, MD, of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, and colleagues. They reported two cases of patients who were driven away from metformin because of its stench. In the first case, a man who had been taking the branded drug Glucophage for several years was switched to an immediate-release, generic version of the drug. He reported that it smelled like "dead fish" and that it nauseated him. He was prescribed a generic, extended-release version and reported no further problems. In the second case, another man described the odor of the immediate-release generic metformin he took as "fishy" and he stopped taking it. He was unwilling to try an extended-release formula. Although drug directories list metformin as "odorless," and no previous studies have linked the smell of immediate-release metformin with discontinuation, the authors wrote that it's well known among pharmacists that metformin either smells like fish or "old locker room sweat socks." Diabetes and prescription drug message boards, too, contain Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Stinks, Doctors Find

Diabetes Drug Stinks, Doctors Find

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why many patients stop taking it, U.S. doctors reported on Monday. The drug smells like fish or dirty socks to some people and this could account for the well-known side effects of the drug, which can make people nauseated, they said. But the problem could be solved by coating the pills so they do not smell or release the odor into the stomach, where it can be burped up, they wrote in a letter to the Annals of Internal Medicine. “We wonder why this reaction to metformin has not been previously reported,” Dr. Allen Pelletier of the Medical College of Georgia and colleagues wrote in a letter to the journal. “Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the medication.” They described two cases in detail. The first had taken brand-name metformin (Glucophage, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb) for several years before being switched to an immediate release, generic version of metformin, which he refused to take. “He reported that it smelled like ‘dead fish’ and nauseated him,” they wrote. An extended release generic version, coated to make it dissolve more slowly, solved the problem. A second man refused to ever take metformin again, even coated formulations, they said. “Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes patients to stop taking the drug,” they wrote. Doctors may simply think patients are having the other side-effects such as diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, flatulence, distention and abdominal pain, but the smell could make patients feel ill, Pelletier and Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Ray Sahelian, M.D. Metformin is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet alone or diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercising will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet, your exercise, or both, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your health care professional will teach you what to do if this happens. At some point, metformin may stop working as well and your blood glucose will increase. You will need to know if this happens and what to do. Instead of taking more metformin, your doctor may want you to change to another antidiabetic medicine. If that does not lower your blood sugar, your doctor may have you stop taking the medicine and begin receiving insulin injections instead. Metformin does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. Metformin is available only with your doctor's prescription. Adverse reactions, negative outcomes, toxicity Bad smell and nausea as side effect The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why ma Continue reading >>

Nasty Odor As A Drug Side Effect

Nasty Odor As A Drug Side Effect

If you read the publications on the GSK compound (darapladib) that just failed in Phase III, you may notice something odd. These mention “odor” as a side effect in the clinical trial subjects. Say what? If you look at the structure, there’s a para-fluorobenzyl thioether in there, and I’ve heard that this is apparently not oxidized in vivo (a common fate for sulfides). That sends potentially smelly parent compound (and other metabolites?) into general circulation, where it can exit in urine and feces and even show up in things like sweat and breath. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of another modern drug that has a severe odor liability. Anyone have examples? Update: plenty of examples in the comments! Continue reading >>

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Researchers have discovered what many people with diabetes have known for years: The popular Type 2 diabetes drug metformin (brand names Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet, and others) has a distinctive scent that, for some people, is enough to cause them to stop taking it. But as the most widely prescribed diabetes drug in the United States, metformin plays an important role in helping people with Type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels, and experts have suggested several solutions for dealing with the medicine’s unique scent. In a letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, physicians from the Medical College of Georgia described two adult men with Type 2 diabetes who complained of a “dead fish” odor of metformin that had led both men to stop taking the medicine. Searching the medical literature for more information, author J. Russell May, PharmD, and colleagues found no reports of this issue. Upon searching the Internet, however, the researchers came across hundreds of message board posts referencing metformin’s odor, and an informal survey of pharmacists found that many could identify the medicine by its distinct smell. May and his colleagues wrote to the journal to raise awareness of this issue and questioned whether nausea, one of the most commonly reported side effects of metformin, could in some cases in fact be a reaction the fishy odor. May noted that “Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient’s mind…they may think the drug isn’t good.” (A manufacturer of metformin notes that there has been no association between the odor of metformin and its effectiveness.) The authors indicated that switching t Continue reading >>

The Smells And Sights Of Summer

The Smells And Sights Of Summer

Summer is upon us, and with it comes such delightful things. The weather is warming up, and that means BO SEASON! YAY! For those new here, when the weather warms up, people start to stink. Its not the subtle smells like cat-piss and just unwashed nasty thats present during the winter months (because you dont need to shower if you dont sweat! ). This is full on brown-underarm stains on that stretched paper-thin wife-beater stank. Usually you can spot them coming as they walk in the door. They are always: Swinging their arms like they are doing the twist when they walk Dressed in a wife-beater stretched to its absolute limits while covered in various stains Complain loudly about their Fatsomyalgia Now this is when as a pharmacist you need to really pony-up and exert your status on your clerks. You make THEM wait on this guy. If you dont flex your college educated muscles, all of your clerks will scatter and find something more pressing to do (or use the restroom, all of them, at once) leaving you high and dry. You always have your techs as a human shield, but these mouth-breathers always utter the words we hate to hear the most Just typing those words makes my fingers burn. At this point, its every pharmacist for him/herself. The PIC (pharmacist in charge) will throw down the PIC card, and then its whoever been there the least amount of time. If you are fortunate enough to have an intern, they take the bullet for you, always. If that intern doesnt wait on that smelly fat-ass, then you fail (or fire) them for not doing pharmacist-in-training duties. What adds insult to injury, is that its always some stupid question like *gasp* WHERES THE MOTRIN *gasp*. Its never WHERES THE SOAP or WHERES THE DEODORANTor WHAT ARE THE PHARMACOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF TAKING EXTENDED RELEASE Continue reading >>

My Metformin Smells Like Fish

My Metformin Smells Like Fish

Gynecology Center for Young Womens Health Bad breath can be caused by metformin. M a kid and my breath smells really bad. Lately i am getting complaints from my partner that when i ejaculate there is a strong smell like rotten fish, since i am diabetic type ii, so it has. You will notice the smell when you open the bottle. How to Get Rid of Bad Breath. It is the chemical metformin itself. The chemical metformin characteristically smells like fish. WebMD experts and contributors provide answers to your health questions. If the other urine smells don. Metformin Smell Page 2 MedsChat Types of gas have characteristic obnoxious smells. You should be eating lean meats like chicken and fish. Dont stop taking metformin. Bowel Smells, Bloating and Passing Gas. My metformin smells like fish get Rid of Fish Odors From Your. Much like air is added to dough when you. Video embeddedTo get rid of body odor, How to. Undiagnosed problem swallowing food or pills More my metformin smells like fish questions about Health, Women. I dont estradiol testosterone cream benefits eat fish at all, no seafood. T alone i have no idea why mine smells like that all of a sudden and lasted. Including eggs, beans, chicken, some cheeses, fish and many other foods can give the body an odor that is often called fish odor. A little over three weeks ago, my wife had a bad breakout of hives that started just as she was finishing a prescription. Metallic smelling stool. Food and Diet Diabetes Education Diabetes Action Metformin hydrochloride sustained release the. Some women report a strong fish. Drugs com metformin another mechanism weight my. When metformin is taken along with fertility medications, Urine that smells bad or looks milky. Diabetes Drug Metformin What Your Body Odor Says About Your Health. One d Continue reading >>

Does Something Smell Fishy? It Could Be Your Metformin

Does Something Smell Fishy? It Could Be Your Metformin

If you regularly take metformin, one of the oldest and most respected tools in doctors’ anti-diabetes kits, chances are that you don’t detect the unpleasant odor that turns some type 2s against the drug. Some think it has fishy smell, while others say that it reminds them of the inside of an inner tube. It’s usually metformin’s immediate-release formulation that has the off-putting smells, according to a Georgia professor who described the phenomenon in the February 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. In his letter, J. Russell May, a clinical professor at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy at the Medical College of Georgia, said that he and his colleagues began wondering about the issue when two type 2 men under their care began complaining about the “dead fish” smell of the quick-release version of metformin. The smell was off-putting enough that both men stopped taking metformin. One of the men later began taking extended-release metformin and reported no smell. The other declined to take the extended-release version. The men’s reaction spurred May and his colleagues to search through medical literature for reports about metformin’s smell. Although they found nothing in the literature, they did find hundreds of references to the drug’s smell on message boards. When they queried pharmacists, some reported that they could identify metformin by an odor that they compared to “old locker-room sweat socks.” May and his colleagues acknowledge that their look into metformin’s smell doesn’t constitute major or formal research. But May raised the question of whether the nausea that is a commonly reported side effect of metformin may come from a perception of its odor rather than from the drug itself as it is ingested. In reporting o Continue reading >>

Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Dr. Bernstein has been preaching about this on his web telecasts for years, but it bears repeating: If you are having problems with generic metformin or not seeing it make much impact on your blood sugar, change brands before you assume it isn't working or that you can't tolerate it. I just had this message brought home to me when my pharmacy (Walgreens) filled my prescription for metformin ER with tablets from SunPharma instead of the ones from Teva they'd given me for years. The pills were about half the size of the ones I'd been getting, which suggested they contained less of a matrix substance to slow the release of the metformin. And sure enough, when I took the same dose I had been taking with no problems with the Teva brand metformin, I felt exhausted and semi-poisoned. It felt just like when I had taken an overdose of metformin some years ago, when my family doctor prescribed an overdose after confusing the dosage instructions for regular metformin--which can be taken in larger doses--with those of metformin ER. Not only that, but my fasting blood sugars went up. Clearly the SunPharma metformin ER was not behaving like a true extended release should and releasing slowly through a 24 hour period but was hitting my blood stream all at once and then was done. A quick visit to Google revealed that Sun Pharmaceuticals is an Indian company and that in the past the FDA has forced them to recall batches for quality issues. When it was time to refill my prescription, I called my pharmacy and spoke with the pharmacist who shrugged off my concerns and told me I'd have to speak to the pharmacy manager (not available that day.) So I got on the phone and called other local pharmacies and asked them what brand they were dispensing. Two of them still carry the Teva brand, so I Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 I think my body/sweat smells of urine Over the last week I have notice a urine like smell on my body (even after my daily shower). I do have 'ops' moments and wear pads which I change through out the day so thought they might be the smell source. But I don't think it is that. I also still have hot flushes a couple of times a day and hot weather doesn't help. I think I have a general body odour now. On separate occasions different friends have commented. Saying oh it smells like a cat has pissed in here and there is a real fish smell. These were not directed at me but I fear when I see them again they will see that is me smelling. Does anyone know if this is a Diabetes symptom or what I might do to stop this? Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member It may be ketones. See I had a similar problem years ago..went to East Timor for 4 weeks as part of a uni program for social justice but the diet was rice rice and more rice. My skin took on a perculiar odor which inretrospect may have been ketones. I'm type 2 diabetic, didn't take a glucometer and obviously didn't think it through re diet as I was not on meds at that time. Hope things improve of you. If I get ketosis or ketones you get that sorted of small sent or a sent of berries but it is only for a few days when you go to hospital and get meds sent through you which is normally insulin and antibiotics and glucose via a drip and if you don't get it sorted out you can do a lot of damage to your body and organs as it happened to me a couple of months ago and I was really ill with it and I could have died with it if I hadn't seen a doctor in the hospital and I was back to normal within Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug's Big Catch? A Fishy Odor

Diabetes Drug's Big Catch? A Fishy Odor

drug may cause some people to discontinue its use. Metformin, an oral drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, generally has few serious side effects, but gastrointestinal upset and nausea are common. Although these effects have been well documented in studies, researchers say one unique characteristic of the pills may have been overlooked as a potential cause of the nausea: their strong fishy odor. Researchers say adverse reactions to the smell of metformin (sold generically and under the brand name Glucophage), have not been documented in medical literature, but hundreds of postings to message boards on the Internet note the strong fishy smell of the drug. In their report, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers describe two cases in which patients discontinued use of generic metformin because of what they described as the nauseating smell of the drug. Researchers say the odor, described as fishy or "like old locker room sweat socks," varies considerably between generic versions of metformin and seems to be more apparent with the immediate-release formulations. "Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes patients to stop taking the drug," write researcher Allen L. Pelletier, MD, of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, and colleagues. "Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the drug." Instead, when patients stop taking metformin, researchers say physicians should ask about any reaction to the smell of the drug and try a film-coated, extended-release formulation of metformin as an alternative. Continue reading >>

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

Research letter reports what medical literature hasn't: metformin's odor is off-putting Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2010 (HealthDay News) -- The commonly used diabetes medication metformin sometimes has such an unpleasant odor that people may stop taking it, experts say. But they recommend that people let their doctors know if the smell of this oral drug is an issue for them, because different formulations -- especially the extended-relief version -- tend to have a milder odor, if any at all, reports a letter in the Feb. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient's mind, because it smells like something that has gone bad, they may think the drug isn't good," explained one of the letter's authors, J. Russell May, a clinical professor at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy at the Medical College of Georgia. However, May said, "some metformin products on the market are extended-release and the drug is embedded and released slow, over time. These products have much less smell, if any." May and his colleagues wrote the letter to the journal to raise awareness of this issue, especially because nausea is a commonly reported side effect of metformin. "Is it nausea from the medication, or is it because it smells bad?" May said. Physicians at the Medical College of Georgia had two adult mal Continue reading >>

Why Do Metformin Hcl Tablets Smell So Bad?

Why Do Metformin Hcl Tablets Smell So Bad?

It seems to me that this odor generated by Metformin HCl is dependent on the manufacturer, the dosage form and package. This problem is more usually observed in brands which is instant-released and those with a large package content. People generally reported a fishy smell. Although no evidence have been reported that this could affect its efficacy, it does have a negative impact upon patient's continuity of using this medication. This phenomenon may wear out, as your olfactory receptors get unregulated by regular contact. My suggestion is that if you really find this smell annoying, consult with your physician about your switching to other substitutes. Continue reading >>

My Metformin Smells Like Fish – 549907

My Metformin Smells Like Fish – 549907

This amazing site, which includes experienced business for 9 years, is one of the leading pharmacies on the Internet. We take your protection seriously. They are available 24 hours each day, 7 days per week, through email, online chat or by mobile. Privacy is vital to us. Everything we do at this amazing site is 100% legal. – Really Amazing prices – NO PRESCRIPTION REQUIRED! – Top Quality Medications! – Discount & Bonuses – Fast and Discreet Shipping Worldwide – 24/7 Customer Support. Free Consultation! – Visa, MasterCard, Amex etc. – – – – – – – – – – My Metformin Smells Like Fish Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do. – Diabetes Self…19 Feb 2010 Noticed your metformin smelling fishy? These tips from researchers can help you reduce the odor of this popular diabetes medicine.Diabetes Drug Metformin Has Fishy Odor -…16 Feb 2010 Metformin's Dead Fish Smell May Cause Some to Discontinue Use Researchers say the odor, described as fishy or "like old locker room Stinky Diabetes Drug May Result in Poor Adherence | buy canadian viagra Medpage…16 Feb 2010 Diabetes and prescription drug message boards, too, contain posts such as "my bottle of metformin smells like fish" and and "why does my Does Something Smell Fishy? It Could Be Your…4 Mar 2010 Some think it has fishy smell, while others say that it reminds them of the about the “dead fish” smell of the quick-release version of metformin.Metformin Smell – MedsChatwhy does it smell like fish? ## I got my script refilled the other day and the new one smells like fish too! My first bottle (different manufact) did not Metformin Smell (Newest posts first) – MedsChatwhy does it smell like fish? ## I got my script refilled the other day and the new one smells like fish too! My fir Continue reading >>

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