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Metformin Smell

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

Research letter reports what medical literature hasn't: metformin's odor is off-putting Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2010 (HealthDay News) -- The commonly used diabetes medication metformin sometimes has such an unpleasant odor that people may stop taking it, experts say. But they recommend that people let their doctors know if the smell of this oral drug is an issue for them, because different formulations -- especially the extended-relief version -- tend to have a milder odor, if any at all, reports a letter in the Feb. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient's mind, because it smells like something that has gone bad, they may think the drug isn't good," explained one of the letter's authors, J. Russell May, a clinical professor at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy at the Medical College of Georgia. However, May said, "some metformin products on the market are extended-release and the drug is embedded and released slow, over time. These products have much less smell, if any." May and his colleagues wrote the letter to the journal to raise awareness of this issue, especially because nausea is a commonly reported side effect of metformin. "Is it nausea from the medication, or is it because it smells bad?" May said. Physicians at the Medical College of Georgia had two adult mal Continue reading >>

U.s. Fda Approves Invokamet (canagliflozin/metformin Hcl) For The Treatment Of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes | Johnson & Johnson

U.s. Fda Approves Invokamet (canagliflozin/metformin Hcl) For The Treatment Of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes | Johnson & Johnson

U.S. FDA Approves INVOKAMET (canagliflozin/metformin HCl) for the Treatment of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes In Phase 3 studies, INVOKANA plus metformin lowered blood sugar and reduced secondary endpoints of body weight and systolic blood pressure to a greater degree than metformin alone RARITAN, N.J., August 8, 2014 Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved INVOKAMET, a fixed-dose therapy combining canagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride in a single tablet, for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. INVOKAMET provides the clinical attributes of INVOKANA (canagliflozin), the first sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor available in the United States, together with metformin, which is commonly prescribed early in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. INVOKAMET is the first fixed-dose combination of an SGLT2 inhibitor with metformin approved in the United States. INVOKAMET combines, in one tablet, two complementary therapeutic approaches proven effective for managing type 2 diabetes, said Richard Aguilar, M.D.*, Medical Director of Diabetes Nation. "Canagliflozin works with the kidney to promote the loss of glucose in the urine, whereas metformin decreases the production of glucose in the liver and improves the bodys response to insulin. INVOKAMET is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are not adequately controlled by treatment that includes either canagliflozin or metformin, or who are already being treated with both canagliflozin and metformin as separate medications. INVOKAMET should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Study results demonstrated that administr Continue reading >>

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

There are certain things that we do in every day life that cause us to smell. Excessive sweating while exercising, poor hygiene and some of the foods we eat can give us some pretty bad body odor (B.O. for short). But body odor can sometimes be attributed to more than just the occasional workout or a clove of garlic. Video of the Day Diabetes is one of the more common causes of body odor. When someone who has diabetes fails to monitor and take care of his blood sugar, he can develop a condition called ketoacidosis. With ketoacidosis, not only does the person suffer from breath that is best described as fruity, a pungent body odor is also present. Ketoacidosis is a serious issue and needs to be addressed by a doctor immediately. An overactive thyroid gland is another cause of body odor. The thyroid gland causes us to sweat. When it's working overtime, as with hyperthyroidism, the body excretes an excessive amount of sweat even with little or no exertion. The thyroid should be checked for proper functioning once every year or two. Hyperthyroidism is treatable. If you notice an unnatural amount of sweat and the body odor that comes with it, see a doctor. Bad body odor can also be caused by dysfunction in the kidneys and liver. The kidneys and the liver help to remove toxins from our system through waste product. When they don't do their jobs, toxins can build up in the blood and digestive tract, which in turn creates an odor. This could be a product of either liver or kidney disease. A simple blood test can tell if there is a problem with either of these two vital organs. Continue reading >>

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

A while back, I wrote about how dapagliflozin revolutionised my glucose control. Almost overnight, I changed from a morbid and morbidly obese failing diabetic to a nearly new fifty-something with a rejuvenated lust for life. My HbA1c returned to normal levels and my retinopathy disappeared. I was advised to stop taking gliclazide as my glucose control seemed to be perfect, and I didn’t want to experience hypoglycaemia. I even stopped pricking my finger to measure my blood sugar. I felt my diabetes was behind me. I had also discovered a low-carb diet I could live with: bacon and eggs, kebabs, lamb chops and steaks with mustard, hummus and delicious cheeses, all accompanied by lots of salads in mayonnaise, and non-starchy veggies. Yumm! I lost three stone effortlessly. It became embarrassing how many people remarked on how well I looked, having been a sickly fat blighter for all the time before. I felt strong enough to take on a big project helping to plan and implement the regeneration of healthcare in my very rural locale. It involved lots of travelling to meet the public and speak frankly to them while thinking on my feet. I attended endless meetings and video conferences where I had to learn the tiresome new lingo of management-speak. All of this was done alongside my day and night job as a resident consultant in intensive care and anaesthesia. Before even six months were up, I began to feel a bit flakey. My memory and concentration were not good. I was having difficulty keeping up with the meetings. I was prone to emotional lability, most noticeably at home, and, most worrying of all, I was drinking too much alcohol to get to sleep. And then I noticed the smells of scrumpy and pear drops in my breath, sweat and urine. Not everyone can detect these smells. My blood Continue reading >>

Fishy Smell

Fishy Smell

If your vulva smells fishy, it is almost certain that you have bacterial vaginosis (also known as anaerobic vaginosis). This is an imbalance in the bacteria in the vagina. All women have harmless bacteria in their vaginal passage. In bacterial vaginosis, some of the bacteria multiply so that more are present than is normal (it is usually the Gardnerella and Mobiluncus bacteria that are the culprits). In other words, bacterial vaginosis is not an infection caught from your partner, it is caused by bacteria that are normally present in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is treated with an antibiotic, metronidazole, from your doctor. You will find more information on bacterial vaginosis in the section on genital infections. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Ray Sahelian, M.D. Metformin is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet alone or diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercising will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet, your exercise, or both, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your health care professional will teach you what to do if this happens. At some point, metformin may stop working as well and your blood glucose will increase. You will need to know if this happens and what to do. Instead of taking more metformin, your doctor may want you to change to another antidiabetic medicine. If that does not lower your blood sugar, your doctor may have you stop taking the medicine and begin receiving insulin injections instead. Metformin does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. Metformin is available only with your doctor's prescription. Adverse reactions, negative outcomes, toxicity Bad smell and nausea as side effect The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why ma Continue reading >>

8 Reasons Your Farts Smell So Bad

8 Reasons Your Farts Smell So Bad

What makes farts stinky? To fart is human. People break wind an average of 14 times a day, emitting anywhere from half a liter to more than 2 liters of gas over a 24-hour period. And, believe it or not, 99% of gas is odor-free. But sometimes your farts are just downright funky. “Silent-but-deadly ones, the really smelly guys, are due to fermentation by bacteria in your colon,” says Patricia Raymond, MD, a Virginia Beach-based gastroenterologist and assistant professor of clinical internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School. If you’re having wicked gas, it’s probably something you ate–and not necessarily a bad thing. Gas is a healthy, normal byproduct of digestion, after all. While the smell may be embarrassing in social situations, it might mean you’ve fed your gut nutritious, fiber-rich, plant-based foods. However, sometimes a bad odor can signal a more serious health problem requiring a thorough workup by a GI doc. Here are eight reasons why the gas you pass can sometimes be offensive. The bugs in your gut During digestion, gut bacteria produce sulfur-containing compounds like hydrogen sulfide that create a stench in your gas, Dr. Raymond notes. The foods you eat can influence the population of bacteria that live in your colon, and that can affect your farts, explains Frederick Gandolfo, MD, a gastroenterologist at Precision Digestive Care in Huntington, New York. “Certain people have a certain type of flora inside of them that causes them to produce more gas or smellier gas,” he says. Sulfur-rich foods Foods high in sulfur can make your farts reek of rotten eggs. Cruciferous veggies like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage are often to blame. Other sulfur-rich foods include garlic, onions, legumes, cheddar cheese, dried fruit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Recall Over Unusual Odor Problem

Diabetes Drug Recall Over Unusual Odor Problem

Category: Protecting Your Family Tags: Glumetza, Metformin, FDA, Recall, TBA LEARN MORE Depomed Inc. Web site IB News – Tylenol, Motrin Recall for Unusual Odor- January 2010 PDR Health on Glumetza Web site IMAGE SOURCE: Glumetza image from drugs.com Web site Same Problem As J & J 52 lots of the diabetes drug Glumetza (metformin hydrochloride) have been recalled due to traces of a certain chemical in the 500 mg bottle. The manufacturer is Depomed Inc. of Menlo Park, California, and the chemical contamination is consistent with the smell and taste of the chemical 2.4.6-tribromoanisole (TBA), the same compound that caused Johnson & Johnson to recall 53 million bottles of its over-the-counter (OTC) products because of a musty smell last year. The chemical can cause temporary but non-serious gastrointestinal upset, reports Reuters, when present in the same small amount that generates a smell. The 1,000 mg formulation, which represents about 40 percent of the company’s total Glumetza net sales, is not impacted. TBA is used on wood pallets that transport the OTC product bottles to its manufacturer in Puerto Rico. Glumetza is produced by a contracted manufacturer in Puerto Rico. Depomed has asked the bottle supplier to discontinue the use of TBA on its pallets. The recall is presently being carried out at the wholesale level and is expected to have up to a $2 million impact on the company. The company will promote the 1,000 mg supply until sales of the 500 mg resumes. The recall followed an investigation of a single product complaint of a smell and taste consistent with the chemical, the company reported. When something smells bad, literally and figuratively, you aggressively investigate and solve the problem," said Deborah Autor, director of the FDA’s compliance office t Continue reading >>

Metformin Urine Odor - Medhelp

Metformin Urine Odor - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin urine odor Simple question here, has anyone ever had a negative blood test and negative urine test and went on with their daily routine and a month or so later found out you were in fact pregnant while having ultrasound done. If this has happened to anyone or perhaps someone you know, please respond, I'd appreciate the information. Thanks. In older times a fasting glucose tolerance test was advised, or what is known as an insulin clamp procedure. Often the urine has a fruity smell due to the presence of what are called ketone bodies. A combination of excessive urination plus fruity odor is also a hallmark of diabetes. It would pay to obtain a glucose meter and learn how to use it. There are reasons other than diabetes for excessive urination, to include endochrine dysfunction or kidney disorders. Sore blistered tongue HURTSdistinct Night blindness pale skin/ gray lipslittle white bumps on my bottom left eyelid right now Deep cystic nodular acne over entire face and neck (NEVER had acne until 23ish) dizziness-faintness when standing/crouching complete brain fog, almost impossible to focus or functionirritability inexplainable bruising breath tastes bad over last 2 years, increases in body odor no matter how much I shower chronic sinus drainage - never feels like a cold since Body odor is a product of the aprocrine glands. They are located in the axillae, nipples, areolae, anogenital area, eyelids, and external ears. In response to emotional or physical stimuli the glands secrete a white fluid containing protein, carbohydrates, and other substances. Secretions are usually odorless. Bacterial decomposition of the apocrine sweat produces the characteristic adult body odor unique to the individual. Do not mix this up with regular Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Stinks, Doctors Find

Diabetes Drug Stinks, Doctors Find

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why many patients stop taking it, U.S. doctors reported on Monday. The drug smells like fish or dirty socks to some people and this could account for the well-known side effects of the drug, which can make people nauseated, they said. But the problem could be solved by coating the pills so they do not smell or release the odor into the stomach, where it can be burped up, they wrote in a letter to the Annals of Internal Medicine. “We wonder why this reaction to metformin has not been previously reported,” Dr. Allen Pelletier of the Medical College of Georgia and colleagues wrote in a letter to the journal. “Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the medication.” They described two cases in detail. The first had taken brand-name metformin (Glucophage, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb) for several years before being switched to an immediate release, generic version of metformin, which he refused to take. “He reported that it smelled like ‘dead fish’ and nauseated him,” they wrote. An extended release generic version, coated to make it dissolve more slowly, solved the problem. A second man refused to ever take metformin again, even coated formulations, they said. “Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes patients to stop taking the drug,” they wrote. Doctors may simply think patients are having the other side-effects such as diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, flatulence, distention and abdominal pain, but the smell could make patients feel ill, Pelletier and Continue reading >>

Nasty Odor As A Drug Side Effect

Nasty Odor As A Drug Side Effect

If you read the publications on the GSK compound (darapladib) that just failed in Phase III, you may notice something odd. These mention “odor” as a side effect in the clinical trial subjects. Say what? If you look at the structure, there’s a para-fluorobenzyl thioether in there, and I’ve heard that this is apparently not oxidized in vivo (a common fate for sulfides). That sends potentially smelly parent compound (and other metabolites?) into general circulation, where it can exit in urine and feces and even show up in things like sweat and breath. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of another modern drug that has a severe odor liability. Anyone have examples? Update: plenty of examples in the comments! Continue reading >>

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Researchers have discovered what many people with diabetes have known for years: The popular Type 2 diabetes drug metformin (brand names Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet, and others) has a distinctive scent that, for some people, is enough to cause them to stop taking it. But as the most widely prescribed diabetes drug in the United States, metformin plays an important role in helping people with Type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels, and experts have suggested several solutions for dealing with the medicine’s unique scent. In a letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, physicians from the Medical College of Georgia described two adult men with Type 2 diabetes who complained of a “dead fish” odor of metformin that had led both men to stop taking the medicine. Searching the medical literature for more information, author J. Russell May, PharmD, and colleagues found no reports of this issue. Upon searching the Internet, however, the researchers came across hundreds of message board posts referencing metformin’s odor, and an informal survey of pharmacists found that many could identify the medicine by its distinct smell. May and his colleagues wrote to the journal to raise awareness of this issue and questioned whether nausea, one of the most commonly reported side effects of metformin, could in some cases in fact be a reaction the fishy odor. May noted that “Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient’s mind…they may think the drug isn’t good.” (A manufacturer of metformin notes that there has been no association between the odor of metformin and its effectiveness.) The authors indicated that switching t Continue reading >>

Metformin, A Review

Metformin, A Review

Metformin is a drug that shows up in discussion here every so often. It is thought to be a calorie restriction mimetic, recapitulating some of the metabolic changes caused by the practice of calorie restriction. Its effects on life span in laboratory animals are up for debate and further accumulation of evidence - the results are on balance more promising than the generally dismal situation for resveratrol, but far less evidently beneficial than rapamycin. Like rapamycin, metformin isn't something you'd want to take as though it were candy, even if the regulators stood back to make that possible, as the side effects are not pleasant and potentially serious. I should note as an aside that while ongoing research into the effects of old-school drugs of this nature is certainly interesting, it doesn't really present a path to significantly enhanced health and longevity. It is a pity that such research continues to receive the lion's share of funding, given that the best case outcome is an increase in our knowledge of human metabolism, not meaningful longevity therapies. Even if the completely beneficial mechanism of action is split out from the drug's actions - as seems to be underway for rapamycin - the end results will still only be a very modest slowing of aging. You could do better by exercising, or practicing calorie restriction. For the billions in funding poured into these drug investigation programs, there should be a better grail at the end of the road - such as that offered by the SENS vision of rejuvenation biotechnology. Targeted repair of the biological damage of aging is a far, far better strategy than gently slowing the pace of damage accumulation through old-style drug discovery programs. This is a biotechnology revolution: time to start acting like it. Anyw Continue reading >>

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The “natural” blood-sugar remedy that had been sidelined for far too long What I’m about to tell you may be shocking. And it’s sure to ruffle the feathers of many of the “natural know-it-alls.” But the science is clear, so I’m not afraid to say it: If you have unmanaged Type II diabetes, you should consider the drug metformin as a first line of treatment. And you won’t get the full story anywhere else, since the natural health industry wouldn’t be caught dead recommending a drug. So, please allow me to do the honors here… Think of it as your emergency “get out of jail free card” Diabetes is deadly. High blood sugar coursing through your body destroys your eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, and more. So the sooner you bring it down the better. (Just like high blood pressure, for which I also recommend tried and true medications as a first-line treatment for unmanaged hypertension.) And in this case, the science is clear—the drug metformin has been proven safe and effective for most people. And since it’s now a generic drug, it’s highly cost effective, too. Now don’t get me wrong…I’m not saying diet and exercise isn’t important. In fact, they’re the best means for preventing and even reversing Type II diabetes entirely. Something metformin can’t do. And there are certainly dietary supplements that can help with maintaining healthy blood sugar (like berberine). But Type II diabetes doesn’t develop overnight. And let’s face it, changing the habits and consequences that got us there in the first place isn’t an overnight task either. So if you need additional help, this is one rare instance where you shouldn’t be afraid to look at a mainstream therapy. And when an option this effective comes along to help kick-start your efforts saf Continue reading >>

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