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Metformin Smell

The Smells And Sights Of Summer

The Smells And Sights Of Summer

Summer is upon us, and with it comes such delightful things. The weather is warming up, and that means BO SEASON! YAY! For those new here, when the weather warms up, people start to stink. Its not the subtle smells like cat-piss and just unwashed nasty thats present during the winter months (because you dont need to shower if you dont sweat! ). This is full on brown-underarm stains on that stretched paper-thin wife-beater stank. Usually you can spot them coming as they walk in the door. They are always: Swinging their arms like they are doing the twist when they walk Dressed in a wife-beater stretched to its absolute limits while covered in various stains Complain loudly about their Fatsomyalgia Now this is when as a pharmacist you need to really pony-up and exert your status on your clerks. You make THEM wait on this guy. If you dont flex your college educated muscles, all of your clerks will scatter and find something more pressing to do (or use the restroom, all of them, at once) leaving you high and dry. You always have your techs as a human shield, but these mouth-breathers always utter the words we hate to hear the most Just typing those words makes my fingers burn. At this point, its every pharmacist for him/herself. The PIC (pharmacist in charge) will throw down the PIC card, and then its whoever been there the least amount of time. If you are fortunate enough to have an intern, they take the bullet for you, always. If that intern doesnt wait on that smelly fat-ass, then you fail (or fire) them for not doing pharmacist-in-training duties. What adds insult to injury, is that its always some stupid question like *gasp* WHERES THE MOTRIN *gasp*. Its never WHERES THE SOAP or WHERES THE DEODORANTor WHAT ARE THE PHARMACOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF TAKING EXTENDED RELEASE Continue reading >>

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

A while back, I wrote about how dapagliflozin revolutionised my glucose control. Almost overnight, I changed from a morbid and morbidly obese failing diabetic to a nearly new fifty-something with a rejuvenated lust for life. My HbA1c returned to normal levels and my retinopathy disappeared. I was advised to stop taking gliclazide as my glucose control seemed to be perfect, and I didn’t want to experience hypoglycaemia. I even stopped pricking my finger to measure my blood sugar. I felt my diabetes was behind me. I had also discovered a low-carb diet I could live with: bacon and eggs, kebabs, lamb chops and steaks with mustard, hummus and delicious cheeses, all accompanied by lots of salads in mayonnaise, and non-starchy veggies. Yumm! I lost three stone effortlessly. It became embarrassing how many people remarked on how well I looked, having been a sickly fat blighter for all the time before. I felt strong enough to take on a big project helping to plan and implement the regeneration of healthcare in my very rural locale. It involved lots of travelling to meet the public and speak frankly to them while thinking on my feet. I attended endless meetings and video conferences where I had to learn the tiresome new lingo of management-speak. All of this was done alongside my day and night job as a resident consultant in intensive care and anaesthesia. Before even six months were up, I began to feel a bit flakey. My memory and concentration were not good. I was having difficulty keeping up with the meetings. I was prone to emotional lability, most noticeably at home, and, most worrying of all, I was drinking too much alcohol to get to sleep. And then I noticed the smells of scrumpy and pear drops in my breath, sweat and urine. Not everyone can detect these smells. My blood Continue reading >>

Fishy Smell

Fishy Smell

If your vulva smells fishy, it is almost certain that you have bacterial vaginosis (also known as anaerobic vaginosis). This is an imbalance in the bacteria in the vagina. All women have harmless bacteria in their vaginal passage. In bacterial vaginosis, some of the bacteria multiply so that more are present than is normal (it is usually the Gardnerella and Mobiluncus bacteria that are the culprits). In other words, bacterial vaginosis is not an infection caught from your partner, it is caused by bacteria that are normally present in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is treated with an antibiotic, metronidazole, from your doctor. You will find more information on bacterial vaginosis in the section on genital infections. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Metformin Side Effects, Use For Diabetes Treatment, Dosage

Ray Sahelian, M.D. Metformin is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet alone or diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercising will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet, your exercise, or both, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your health care professional will teach you what to do if this happens. At some point, metformin may stop working as well and your blood glucose will increase. You will need to know if this happens and what to do. Instead of taking more metformin, your doctor may want you to change to another antidiabetic medicine. If that does not lower your blood sugar, your doctor may have you stop taking the medicine and begin receiving insulin injections instead. Metformin does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. Metformin is available only with your doctor's prescription. Adverse reactions, negative outcomes, toxicity Bad smell and nausea as side effect The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why ma Continue reading >>

This Is What Your Body Odor Says About Your Health And What You Can Do To Control It

This Is What Your Body Odor Says About Your Health And What You Can Do To Control It

This Is What Your Body Odor Says About Your Health And What You Can Do To Control It Perspiration cools the skin when its hot so you dont overheat and is one way the body rids itself of toxins. We are often embarrassed by sweat and are very conscious of the smell that can accompany itwe try to prevent and cover the smell or keep our armpits from sweating entirely by using antiperspirants. Its not the sweat itself that stinks, its the bacteria that live in the dark moist places on your body that do. From a healthy body, sweat is odorless. Which bacteria thrive and their resulting smell are in direct correlation to what you eat and whatever your body seeks to eliminate: the bacterium depends on its environment. When we sweat, bacteria feed on what is secreted and will emit a particular aroma. As with any other bodily fluid, sweat is more complex than you might think. Healthy perspiration contains excess minerals and metabolic waste: proteins, enzymes, fats, sugars and metals. Adult sweat differs from child sweatmost notably by the absence of glycerol (a sugar made by the body) in a childs sweatwhich is why children dont normally produce a body odor until pubertybacteria love sugar. ( 1 ) The chemical composition of sweat produced by the feet is somewhat different than other body parts, which accounts for its particular perfume. Ingesting chemical additives, red meats, and processed foods can make the bacteria that live on your skin produce an unattractive smell. ( 2 ) Many medications also have an adverse effect on body odor, such as: In some people, a diet low in carbohydrates can also cause body odor; after exhausting available carbohydrates to use for fuel, your liver will begin to use proteins. A by-product of protein metabolism is ammonia, which will be excreted in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug's Big Catch? A Fishy Odor

Diabetes Drug's Big Catch? A Fishy Odor

drug may cause some people to discontinue its use. Metformin, an oral drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, generally has few serious side effects, but gastrointestinal upset and nausea are common. Although these effects have been well documented in studies, researchers say one unique characteristic of the pills may have been overlooked as a potential cause of the nausea: their strong fishy odor. Researchers say adverse reactions to the smell of metformin (sold generically and under the brand name Glucophage), have not been documented in medical literature, but hundreds of postings to message boards on the Internet note the strong fishy smell of the drug. In their report, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers describe two cases in which patients discontinued use of generic metformin because of what they described as the nauseating smell of the drug. Researchers say the odor, described as fishy or "like old locker room sweat socks," varies considerably between generic versions of metformin and seems to be more apparent with the immediate-release formulations. "Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes patients to stop taking the drug," write researcher Allen L. Pelletier, MD, of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, and colleagues. "Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the drug." Instead, when patients stop taking metformin, researchers say physicians should ask about any reaction to the smell of the drug and try a film-coated, extended-release formulation of metformin as an alternative. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

Loss Or Change Of Taste And Metformin

Loss Or Change Of Taste And Metformin

Hi my peeps, heres an e-mail we got from a reader.thought wed share it with you! My 76 year old mom has lost her sense of taste in the last few months after having her metformin doubled to two 500mg tablets a day and adding Furosemide and K-dur 20 meq po tbcr to her list of prescriptions. She has a big heart problem (aortic stenosis with artifical valve replacement) and type 2 diabetes. She also takes the following: Coumadin; Digoxin; Atenolol; Norvasc; and Celebrex. She wont let me call her doctor and she doesnt want to bother her pharmacist for all the reasons you have on your website. Can you give me any suggestions for sorting this out? I am going to go to the doctor with her next week and would like to ask intelligent questions. Thanks! Sharon In looking over your moms drug therapy, she should have no problems with her new medications interacting with the ones she has been taking we can rule that out as a cause for her loss of taste. There are several reasons not related to medications that could lead to loss of taste: 2. Exposure to chemicals (i.e. pesticides) or metals 3. Aging (all senses worsen over time) 4. Loss of smell (this sense is closely related to sense of taste if you lose the ability to smell, your sense of taste is going to be worse too) 7. Liver or kidney problems (very rare) However, with your moms case, were thinking her loss of taste is most likely from her increase in metformin dose. Potassium and furosemide are not known to cause loss of taste, but metformin has definitely led to taste disorder in patients. Metformin would commonly lead to a metallic taste, but with your moms age (and we know our sense of taste changes/decreases as we get older), the side effect could come across as loss of taste. Patients would notice a taste disorder with me Continue reading >>

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

'fishy Smell' May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug

Research letter reports what medical literature hasn't: metformin's odor is off-putting Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2010 (HealthDay News) -- The commonly used diabetes medication metformin sometimes has such an unpleasant odor that people may stop taking it, experts say. But they recommend that people let their doctors know if the smell of this oral drug is an issue for them, because different formulations -- especially the extended-relief version -- tend to have a milder odor, if any at all, reports a letter in the Feb. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient's mind, because it smells like something that has gone bad, they may think the drug isn't good," explained one of the letter's authors, J. Russell May, a clinical professor at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy at the Medical College of Georgia. However, May said, "some metformin products on the market are extended-release and the drug is embedded and released slow, over time. These products have much less smell, if any." May and his colleagues wrote the letter to the journal to raise awareness of this issue, especially because nausea is a commonly reported side effect of metformin. "Is it nausea from the medication, or is it because it smells bad?" May said. Physicians at the Medical College of Georgia had two adult mal Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Why Do Metformin Hcl Tablets Smell So Bad?

Why Do Metformin Hcl Tablets Smell So Bad?

It seems to me that this odor generated by Metformin HCl is dependent on the manufacturer, the dosage form and package. This problem is more usually observed in brands which is instant-released and those with a large package content. People generally reported a fishy smell. Although no evidence have been reported that this could affect its efficacy, it does have a negative impact upon patient's continuity of using this medication. This phenomenon may wear out, as your olfactory receptors get unregulated by regular contact. My suggestion is that if you really find this smell annoying, consult with your physician about your switching to other substitutes. Continue reading >>

Dr. Gott: Medication May Be Cause Of Armpit Odor

Dr. Gott: Medication May Be Cause Of Armpit Odor

Dear Dr. Gott: I’m a 63-year-old black female. I had a total abdominal hysterectomy at age 38 that left me with one ovary. At 51, I went through menopause and was prescribed the smallest dose of Premarin. After five years I slowly weaned myself off it. About 10 years ago, I was diagnosed with diabetes, for which I take generic metformin, 1,500 mg daily. In 2008 I started applying alcohol (as recommended by a friend) to my underarms before applying deodorant to combat odor. At that time the odor was infrequent, but now it’s an almost daily battle. It doesn’t seem to be brought on by anything specific. I currently carry a small piece of soap that I apply dry whenever I detect the odor. It works well, but not all situations allow me to sneak off to apply it. I’m also on the following prescriptions: glimepiride, Norvasc, Enalapril, Synthroid, Vytorin and atenolol. My over-the-counters include a multivitamin, iron, Ester-C, calcium, magnesium, zinc, B complex, krill oil and an 81 mg aspirin. I eat right most of the time, exercise three to four times a week on a treadmill and keep my diabetes under control. My last A1c was 6.1. What do you think? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Dear Reader: Before I tell you what I believe the problem to be, I want to review your prescribed medications. Metformin and glimepiride are used to control diabetes. Norvasc, Enalapril and atenolol are used primarily for the treatment of hypertension. Synthroid is for low thyroid levels. Vytorin is a combination cholesterol-lowering medication. Given this combination of medications, you have hypothyroidism, diabetes, high cholesterol levels and hypertension or a heart condition requiring your blood pressure and cholesterol to be well controlled. It is possible one or a combinatio Continue reading >>

Metformin, A Review

Metformin, A Review

Metformin is a drug that shows up in discussion here every so often. It is thought to be a calorie restriction mimetic, recapitulating some of the metabolic changes caused by the practice of calorie restriction. Its effects on life span in laboratory animals are up for debate and further accumulation of evidence - the results are on balance more promising than the generally dismal situation for resveratrol, but far less evidently beneficial than rapamycin. Like rapamycin, metformin isn't something you'd want to take as though it were candy, even if the regulators stood back to make that possible, as the side effects are not pleasant and potentially serious. I should note as an aside that while ongoing research into the effects of old-school drugs of this nature is certainly interesting, it doesn't really present a path to significantly enhanced health and longevity. It is a pity that such research continues to receive the lion's share of funding, given that the best case outcome is an increase in our knowledge of human metabolism, not meaningful longevity therapies. Even if the completely beneficial mechanism of action is split out from the drug's actions - as seems to be underway for rapamycin - the end results will still only be a very modest slowing of aging. You could do better by exercising, or practicing calorie restriction. For the billions in funding poured into these drug investigation programs, there should be a better grail at the end of the road - such as that offered by the SENS vision of rejuvenation biotechnology. Targeted repair of the biological damage of aging is a far, far better strategy than gently slowing the pace of damage accumulation through old-style drug discovery programs. This is a biotechnology revolution: time to start acting like it. Anyw Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glipizide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex Your doctor will want to check your progress at regular visits , especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Under certain conditions, too much glipizide and metformin can cause lactic acidosis. Symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear and usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and are very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If symptoms of lactic acidosis occur, you should get immediate emergency medical help. It is very important to follow carefully any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would normally. Make allowances for changing time zones and keep your meal times as close as possible to your usual meal times. In case of emergency—There may Continue reading >>

Metformin - The First 2 Weeks

Metformin - The First 2 Weeks

The first time I took Metformin I made sure I ate a large meal to counter any icky side effects. I ended up with bad stomach cramps that night. Since then, that hasn't happened again. Also had diarrhea the next morning. Since that first day I've had diarrhea two other times and some constipation. This is just weird for me cause I was very regular before. That's about it for 'bad' side effects. The other things I've noticed have been more interesting that anything. Sometimes I feel a little buzz within about 15 minutes of taking the pill - I'm thinking maybe that's sugars suddenly metabolizing. I also noticed an acute increase in my sense of smell. Of course some smells (like eucalyptus in someone's home) are pleasant and others (second hand smoke) are not! I also felt an increased sensation in my breasts and was frequently quite nip-ply - not that my boyfriend minded! The increased sense of smell and breast sensitivity have faded away now though. As I've been taking the Metformin every night with supper I've also been trying to eat breakfast more often to get ready for starting morning doses. I'm not a morning person so breakfast is tough for me! I've done pretty well so this week I'm going to try starting the Metformin twice a day - breakfast and supper. I guess we'll see what happens with the increase! Continue reading >>

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