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Metformin Slow Release Weight Loss

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Why Metformin (glucophage) Causes Weight Loss And Reduced Appetite Despite Stimulating Ampk?

Why Metformin (glucophage) Causes Weight Loss And Reduced Appetite Despite Stimulating Ampk?

In regard to weight loss, Metformin provides two primary benefits. First, it significantly improves glycemic control. This stabilizes your blood sugar, and makes you less likely to experience the up-and-down rollercoaster experience that often comes along with dieting. The second benefit of Metformin (partially a result of the first benefit) is suppressed appetite. Users typically note a measurable improvement from their usual cravings for food. By simply not desiring as much food, and still feeling normal despite eating less (due to the improved glycemic control), the result can be profound weight loss. That’s the good news, but you can’t just take the pill and expect everything to change on its own. Weight loss just doesn’t work that way. Metformin won’t work for you – rather, it will work with you. Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

New Extended-release Metformin Combo Drug Approved

New Extended-release Metformin Combo Drug Approved

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the combination oral diabetes medicine Synjardy XR for use, along with a healthful diet and exercise, in adults with Type 2 diabetes. Synjardy XR, a joint development of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly and Company, combines empagliflozin (brand name Jardiance), an SGLT2 inhibitor, and metformin extended-release (brand name Glucophage XR and others). In the process of filtering the blood, the kidneys typically reabsorb all the filtered glucose and return it to the bloodstream. One of the main proteins responsible for this reabsorption is SGLT2. By inhibiting the action of SGLT2, empagliflozin blocks the reabsorption of glucose by the kidneys, promoting a loss of glucose in the urine and lowering blood glucose levels. Metformin works by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by improving insulin sensitivity in the liver, muscle, and fat cells. Synjardy XR tablets will be offered in doses of 5 milligrams of empagliflozin/1,000 milligrams of metformin extended-release, 10 milligrams of empagliflozin/1,000 milligrams of metformin extended-release, 12.5 milligrams of empagliflozin/1,000 milligrams of metformin extended-release, and 25 milligrams of empagliflozin/1,000 milligrams of metformin extended-release, to be taken once daily with the morning meal. The approval of Synjardy was based on results from multiple studies of empagliflozin and metformin alone or combined with a sulfonylurea in adults with Type 2 diabetes. This medicine should not be used in people with Type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening condition marked by a chemical imbalance in the body), or moderate to severe kidney problems. As with all medicines containing metformin, this drug con Continue reading >>

Metformin Regular Vs Extended Release?

Metformin Regular Vs Extended Release?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My first post - hope I'm doing this right. Dx Type 2 - 3 yrs ago. From that time until about 2 months ago, I was on Metformin 500mg 3 x daily with meals. It worked really well for me. With the exception of my first morning/fasting glucose - my levels were good. I was elated to find that on the Metformin I was finally able to lose some weight -- I had to work at it, but was seeing some real progress for a change. Then approx 2 months ago, the doc changed me to Glumetza (extended release metformin) 1500mg taken first thing in the morning - to try to get on top of the morning highs. My levels are good on Glumetza - though I still have a higher fasting level. I DO like that I don't have to remember pills with each meal. (I forgot to take them too many times). I had thought that the extended release version would be even more helpful for encouraging weight loss but ... the weight loss has stopped - and in fact I have gained weight since starting Glumetza. Is there a difference in the regular metformin and in the extended release variety that would account for the change? Have you heard of anyone else gaining weight on the extended release and losing on regular? Thanks in advance for any input offered. As you can see I'm confused! I've switched from reg Metformin to the SR (Slow Release) form. It is not called Glumetza though. The reason for the switch was headaches 24/7. Sugars were fine, except for fasting sugars. I must say fasting sugars have always been my main problem. Many T2s have problems with fasting sugars. As far as weight I did experience a loss at the beginning (10 pounds perhaps) but Continue reading >>

The Slower The Better

The Slower The Better

Endocrine Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Department of Biomedical Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Obesity Agency, Careggi University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50134 Florence, Italy C. M. Rotella, Email: [email protected] . Received 2014 Jan 20; Accepted 2014 Feb 27. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A new formulation of metformin: metformin extended-release (ER) is now available, with different formulations in each country and it appears relevant to discuss the management of this drug in clinical practice. Metformin, an oral biguanide hypoglycemic agent, is an efficacious tool in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin’s efficacy, security profile, benefic cardiovascular and metabolic effects make this drug as the first agent of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, together with lifestyle modifications [ 1 ]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in the fasting state induces an increase in hepatic gluconeogenesis and induces hyperglycemia in the early morning. Metformin, as its major effect, decreases hepatic glucose output lowering fasting glycaemia and, secondarily, it increases glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. It is generally well tolerated, despite the fact that the most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal ones, which may be tampered by dose titration. In monotherapy metformin decreases HbA1c levels by 0.6–1.0 % and this is not accompanied by hypoglycemia in the large majority of patients. Metformin is neutral with respect to weight or, possibly, induces a modest weight loss. The UKPDS has demonstrated a beneficial effect of metformin therapy on CVD outcomes [ 2 ]. Severe renal dysfunc Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

If you have high blood glucose levels, you may take metformin hydrochloride, an oral anti-hyperglycemic medication that lowers blood sugar. Metformin may also help you lose weight in some cases by decreasing your appetite. Clinical studies have not proven that metformin helps you lose weight if you don't have Type 2 diabetes or other metabolic disorders that cause insulin resistance. It may help prevent weight gain or cause modest weight loss if you're taking antipsychotic drugs that cause weight gain. Metformin comes in several doses, including a 500-milligram extended release form, which you may find easier to take. Video of the Day Metformin might help you lose weight if you have metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary disease, both associated with insulin resistance. The pancreas releases insulin in response to glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin helps cells remove glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat large amounts of high-carb foods, the pancreas may overproduce insulin to keep up. Eventually, your cells stop responding to the insulin and your blood glucose levels rise. Because your cells feel starved for energy, you feel hungry all the time and may crave carbohydrates. Metformin helps cells respond better to insulin, so you don't feel as hungry. Insulin can also cause your liver to convert extra calories to fat. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose your liver produces, and also decreases the amount of glucose absorbed in your intestines. Decreased amounts of glucose in your bloodstream results in less glucose absorbed by your cells. When you absorb less glucose, you lose weight. An Indian study published in the March 2011 "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology" reported that metformin increased weight loss in people taking olanzapine, an antipsychoti Continue reading >>

Weight Gain And Janumet Xr (sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl Extended-release) Tablets

Weight Gain And Janumet Xr (sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl Extended-release) Tablets

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusualonScreenDetect (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “b Continue reading >>

Metformin Sr And Weight Loss

Metformin Sr And Weight Loss

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does Metformin help speed up weight loss please? I mean, apart from making me less hungry, will it actually help with the weight shifting, particularly around my tummy? Also it says to take my Metformin SR with food. How much food should I take with it to avoid tummy problems? Does Metformin help speed up weight loss please? I mean, apart from making me less hungry, will it actually help with the weight shifting, particularly around my tummy? In a word - No! The best you can hope for is reduced appetite. If you are like me, and apple shape, the only way to get rid of the fat around your waist is to walk, and walk, and walk. I scoured all kinds of websites, they all said the same. My tummy flab is going, but I do walk miles, and it is the last of my flab to go. My arms, legs, face, chest, bum, all the fat is gone, I still have quite a bit around my waist, but it's going. Get walking Lucy! Also it says to take my Metformin SR with food. How much food should I take with it to avoid tummy problems? Different strokes for different folks. I found as long as I took my regular Metformin after a meal, I was fine. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

After you eat, sugar goes from your intestines into your bloodstream, and then immediately into your liver. Then your liver releases sugar back into your bloodstream to cause your blood sugar level to rise. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin makes you hungry all the time and causes your liver to convert extra calories to fat and it constricts arteries to cause heart attacks. You need insulin to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high to cause diabetes, nerve damage, heart attacks, strokes and kidney damage. Glucophage reduces sugar release from your liver to prevents blood sugar levels from rising too high, so your body doesn't need to produce as much insulin that makes you hungry and causes your liver to make fat (3,13,14). Glucophage lowers insulin levels (4), prevents many of the side effects of diabetes and can be used by people who want to lose weight. However, Glucophage is not effective when your blood is acidic from excess lactic acid and recent research shows that exercise, which raises lactic acid, does not cause blood acid levels to rise enough to reduce Glucophage's benefits (5). Glucophage, itself, does not raise blood lactate levels and is therefore considerably safer than doctors originally thought. Since Glucophage lowers insulin, diabetics should be placed on Glucophage to lower their requirements for all other medications used to treat diabetes (6). A common cause of obesity in women is called polycystic ovary syndrome, which is caused by having high blood levels of insulin. Glucophage helps these women to lose weight (7-12). See the report on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) in the Women's Health section. Glucophage is a safe medication that prevents blood sugar levels fro Continue reading >>

The Truth About Metformin And Weight Loss

The Truth About Metformin And Weight Loss

The Truth About Metformin And Weight Loss The Truth About Metformin And Weight Loss Did you know that metformin and weight loss are closely related? I will explain what metformin is and what its side effects might be. I will also answer the million dollar question, can it help people lose weight? Almost a hundred years ago it was discovered that meformin reduces blood sugar levels , although it wasn’t until the last few decades that it really became popular in treating patients suffering from diabetes . Metformin is now the best and most popular drug in the world for treating type 2 diabetes, especially for obese and overweight persons with normally functioning kidneys. It is sold under many different trade names – including Glucophage, Carbophage and Gluformin – and it is orally administered either as tablets or in the form of liquid. Tablets are available in three different versions: SR and XR were developed to milden side effects while maintaining the effectiveness of the IR. The tablets are for sale in different strengths, from 500 mg to 1000 mg , and they consist of metformin hydrochloride (also called metformin HCl). The short explanation of how this drug works is this: Metformin hydrochloride reduces the liver’s production of glucose (by roughly a third), which then lowers the level of blood sugar in the body. A longer explanation would also include metformin’s ability to decrease the oxidation of fatty acids, increase insulin sensitivity which will make you feel less hungry, as well as several other positive effects. It would really take an entire article (or even more) to describe all the different aspects of how it works. I just prefer to think of it as a lowered glucose production in the liver. Time for the million dollar question. Can treatm Continue reading >>

And Weight Gain

And Weight Gain

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage SR 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg prolonged release tablets This information is intended for use by health professionals Glucophage SR 500 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 750 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 1000 mg prolonged release tablets 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition 500 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 500mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 390 mg metformin base. 750 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 750 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 585 mg metformin base. 1000 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 780 mg metformin base. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 500 mg: White to off-white, round, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '500'. 750 mg: White capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '750' and on the other side with 'Merck'. 1000 mg: White to off-white capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '1000' and on the other side with 'MERCK'. Reduction in the risk or delay of the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult, overweight patients with IGT* and/or IFG*, and/or increased HbA1C who are: - at high risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (see section 5.1) and - still progressing towards type 2 diabetes mellitus despite implementation of intensive lifestyle change for 3 to 6 months Treatment with Glucophage SR must be based on a risk score incorporating appropriate measures of glycaemic control and including evidence of high cardiovascular risk (see section 5.1). Lifestyle modifications should be continued when metformin is initiated, unless the patient is unable to do so because of medical reasons. *IGT: Impaired Glucose Tolerance; IFG: Impaired Fasting Glucose Trea Continue reading >>

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