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Metformin Side Effects Itching

Possible Side Effects Of Victoza®

Possible Side Effects Of Victoza®

What is the most important information I should know about Victoza®? Victoza® may cause serious side effects, including: Possible thyroid tumors, including cancer. Tell your health care provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. In studies with rats and mice, Victoza® and medicines that work like Victoza® caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Victoza® will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people Do not use Victoza® if you or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2) What is Victoza®? Victoza® (liraglutide) injection 1.2 mg or 1.8 mg is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar (glucose) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and should be used along with diet and exercise. Victoza® is not recommended as the first choice of medicine for treating diabetes It is not known if Victoza® can be used in people who have had pancreatitis Victoza® is not a substitute for insulin and is not for use in people with type 1 diabetes or people with diabetic ketoacidosis It is not known if Victoza® can be used with mealtime insulin It is not known if Victoza® is safe and effective for use in children Who should not use Victoza®? Do not use Victoza® if: You or any of your family have ever had MTC or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2) You are allergic to liraglutide or any of the ingredients in Victoza®. See the end of this Medica Continue reading >>

Apo-glimepiride

Apo-glimepiride

PDFLARGE FONT PDF Contains the active ingredient glimepiride Consumer Medicine Information For a copy of a large print leaflet, Ph: 1800 195 055 What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about APO-Glimepiride. It does not contain all of the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking this medicine against the benefits this medicine is expected to have for you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any concerns about taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Glimepiride. It contains the active ingredient glimepiride. This type of diabetes is also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity onset diabetes. Glimepiride is used when diet and exercise are not enough to control your blood glucose. Glimepiride can be used alone, or together with insulin or other medicines for treating diabetes. How it works Glimepiride belongs to a group of medicines called sulphonylureas. Glimepiride lowers high blood glucose by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your pancreas. If your blood glucose is not properly controlled, you may experience hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) or hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose). Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) can occur suddenly. Signs may include: Weakness, trembling or shaking Sweating Lightheadedness, dizziness, headache or lack of concentration Tearfulness or crying Irritability Hunger Numbness around the lips and tongue If not treated promptly, these may progress to: Loss of co-ordination Slurred speech Confusion Loss of consciousness or seiz Continue reading >>

Toujeo Solostar Side Effects

Toujeo Solostar Side Effects

What Is Toujeo Solostar? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Insulin glargine is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of this medicine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Insulin glargine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure insulin glargine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be diff Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Alpha Lipoic Acid

Health Benefits Of Alpha Lipoic Acid

Alpha lipoic acid is a compound found naturally inside every cell in the body. It's needed by the body to produce the energy for our body's normal functions. Alpha lipoic acid converts glucose (blood sugar) into energy. Other names for it include lipoic acid and thioctic acid. Alpha lipoic acid is also an antioxidant, a substance that neutralizes potentially harmful chemicals called free radicals. What makes alpha lipoic acid unique is that it functions in water and fat, unlike the more common antioxidants, vitamins C and vitamin E, and it appears to be able to recycle antioxidants such as vitamin C and glutathione after they have been used up. Glutathione is an important antioxidant that helps the body eliminate potentially harmful substances. Alpha lipoic acid increases in forming glutathione. Health Benefits Preliminary studies suggest that alpha lipoic may offer a variety of benefits. If you're considering using alpha lipoic acid, talk with your doctor first. Keep in mind that alpha lipoic acid should not be used as a substitute for standard care in treating any condition. Peripheral Neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by injury, nutritional deficiencies, chemotherapy or by conditions such as diabetes, Lyme disease, alcoholism, shingles, thyroid disease and kidney failure. Symptoms can include pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, and itching. Alpha lipoic acid is thought to work as an antioxidant in both water and fatty tissue, enabling it to enter all parts of the nerve cell and protect it from damage. Preliminary studies suggest that alpha lipoic acid may help. In one of the largest studies on the use of alpha lipoic acid, 181 people took 600 mg, 1200 mg or 1800 mg of alpha lipoic acid a day or a placebo. After 5 weeks, alpha lipoic acid improve Continue reading >>

A Picture Guide To Cholesterol Drugs

A Picture Guide To Cholesterol Drugs

How can high cholesterol be controlled? Nearly 1/3 of all adults in the U.S. have high cholesterol levels, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). High cholesterol can put people at risk for heart disease, heart attacks, and death. Cholesterol levels can be lowered with regular exercise, weight loss, and a healthy diet that is low in cholesterol and saturated fats. But in some cases, diet and exercise are not enough and cholesterol-lowering medications may be needed. This slideshow will discuss the basics of cholesterol and the types of drugs prescribed to treat high cholesterol. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance in the blood that is made by the body's liver and helps your body produce hormones, vitamin D, and to digest fat. The other source of cholesterol is from the diet in foods like egg yolks, fatty meats, and cheeses. You only need a small amount to regulate the body processes, and when there is excess cholesterol in the blood, it can build up on the walls of the blood vessels, in deposits called plaque. Plaque can contribute to the narrowing and blockages of arteries that can lead to heart disease. What are LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides? There are different types of cholesterol. Most of your body's cholesterol is low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also referred to as "bad" cholesterol because it can lead to plaque buildup in the arteries, which leads to heart disease and stroke. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is called the "good" cholesterol because it absorbs "bad" cholesterol and carries it back to the liver, which helps remove it from your body. This can reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Triglycerides are a type of fat found in your blood. High triglycerides combines Continue reading >>

Metformin And B12

Metformin And B12

Back in December 2006, Amy Campbell wrote in her blog about the possibility of the popular diabetes drug metformin causing vitamin B12 deficiency. In a follow-up comment, she mentioned that taking calcium supplements might help to remedy this deficiency. The information spurred an outpouring of comments and questions from concerned readers, so those of us on the magazine staff decided to investigate the matter further. Our Q&A editor, Alwa Cooper, contacted Mariejane Braza, MD, and James F. Hanley, MD, of the UTHSCSA-Regional Academic Health Center in Harlingen, Texas, who had recently conducted some research on the topic of metformin and vitamin B12 deficiency. As published in the November/December 2009 issue of Diabetes Self-Management, here is their answer: “Metformin is an important and effective medicine for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes; however, with prolonged use, as many as 30% of the people taking it develop a B12 deficiency. It has been our experience that not all physicians are aware of this association. Detecting B12 deficiency can be difficult, because the early symptoms, such as fatigue or loss of appetite, may be subtle. Other symptoms, such as numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, may be assumed to be complications of diabetes. In a study that we conducted, peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage in the hands, feet, and legs) was more common in subjects with both Type 2 diabetes and B12 deficiency than in those with Type 2 diabetes alone. Prior to our study, it was presumed that these participants’ neuropathy was a complication of their diabetes. We felt, however, that it was not clear whether this was the case or whether B12 deficiency had played a role in or caused the development of the neuropathy. Testing for B12 deficiency may not always b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Itchy Skin – Feeling Itchy?

Diabetes And Itchy Skin – Feeling Itchy?

If you have diabetes and itchy skin you are not alone. The causes and treatment of itching related to diabetes is not mysterious. Let’s see what we can do to stop that itchy feeling. Localized itching is often caused by diabetes, because of complications arising from improperly managed blood sugar levels. This manifests itself in a number of ways but most commonly it is a yeast or fungus infection, dry skin, or poor circulation. Several skin diseases are also more common in diabetics, typically due to poor circulation. dry skin If poor circulation is the cause, your lower legs are often the itchiest areas. Often you can self treat these areas by limiting the number of baths you take, especially if the humidity level is low. Mild moisturized soap can reduce itching as can skin cream applied after a bath or shower (as well as other times). fungus infections No one likes to think about getting a fungus infection. It sounds gross and can look gross. However, we are all adults here and we know that these things do happen through no fault of our own. You do know this right? The most common diabetes related fungus infection is caused by the candida albicans fungus. This is yeast like fungus that can cause rashes along with tiny blisters and scales in moist areas of the body. Particularly susceptible areas for infection include the genital area, under breasts, armpits, and around nails, fingers and toes. You may have heard of some common fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm), vaginal infection and jock itch. There is no “self help” option here. Get to the doctor and get a prescription to take care of this problem. I don’t know about you, but just writing this makes me feel a bit itchy! Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum Continue reading >>

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Got bad breath? Toenail fungus? Problems in the bedroom? You're not alone—and these could be signs of more serious issues Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars. That said, there are many other causes for severe itching. Dry skin from eczema is a common cause that's fairly easy to treat with moisturizers and steroid cream/ointment. Cholestatic liver disease with high blood levels of bilirubin is another cause of severe itching. A normal set of liver enzyme tests will rule this out. Either a very slow or a very fast thyroid can cause itching, so be sure to check thyroid function. Severe chronic kidney failure can also cause itching from the buildup of toxins. High levels of circulating blood histamines from a tumor can cause itching, so be sure to check a blood histamine level. Folks who have a disorder called polycythemia vera may experience itching due to high circulating levels of histamine-producing mast cells. Certain cancers such as carcinoid syndrome or Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can cause extreme itching, so these need to be considered. Parasitic infections are another possible cause, especially after recent travel to endemic areas. Severe emotional stress/anxiety is one more interesting cause for unexplained itching I've encountered in my practice. Q: My blood pressure averages 120/60. I'm concerned about the bottom reading of 60 being too low. I seem to be rather drained, and wonder if it's because my pressure is too low. Is there any food or vitamin I ca Continue reading >>

Headed In The Right Direction?

Headed In The Right Direction?

What is the most important information I should know about TRADJENTA? Serious side effects can happen to people taking TRADJENTA, including inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking TRADJENTA, tell your doctor if you have ever had pancreatitis, gallstones, a history of alcoholism, or high triglyceride levels. Stop taking TRADJENTA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Heart failure. Heart failure means your heart does not pump blood well enough. Before you start taking TRADJENTA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms: increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing, especially when you lie down; swelling or fluid retention, especially in the feet, ankles, or legs; an unusually fast increase in weight or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take TRADJENTA if you are allergic to linagliptin or any of the ingredients in TRADJENTA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction to TRADJENTA may include rash, itching, flaking or peeling; raised red patches on your skin (hives); swelling of your face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking TRADJENTA and call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away. What should I tell my doctor before using TRADJENTA? Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have or have had inflammati Continue reading >>

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Itching and irritation around the genitals can be a sign of high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and diabetes. Causes Possible causes of genital itching include: Diabetes Eczema Low estrogen levels in women Psoriasis Pubic lice Reactions to chemicals used to wash clothes Yeast infections Itching as a symptom of diabetes If diabetes is causing the itching in men, it tends to lead to itching under the foreskin of the penis. In women, it can lead to itching of the vulva, the skin on the outside of the vagina. If diabetes is the cause, you may notice other symptoms of diabetes, such as needing to go to the toilet more often than normal. If you suspect you may have diabetes, see your doctor for a diagnosis. Genital itching and diabetes Itchy privates can occur if blood glucose levels run high, causing sugar to be passed out in the urine. Sugar makes a fertile breeding ground for bacteria and it is a buildup of bacteria around the genitals that causes the itching. If you’re getting itchy down there as a result of high sugar levels, wash the affected area to clean away any build up of bacteria. Don’t use any harsh soaps that might lead to irritation. If you can bring your blood glucose levels back to normal, this also should help the itching to subside. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high levels of glucose in the bloodstream which leads to hyperglycemia if untreated. It is strongly linked to obesity and unhealthy lifestyle habits such as lack of physical activity, poor diet and smoking. How common is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common form of diabetes mellitus, accounting for roughly 90% of all cases of diabetes. It affects an estimated 330 million people worldwide, including over 29 million people in the Unite Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Summary Common metformin side effects include gastrointestinal problems such as nausea, vomiting, cramps and diarrhea. Hypoglycemia and lactic acid build-up are other more serious—but more rare—side effects of metformin. Some women may also experience vitamin B12 deficiency, and children specifically may possibly experience abnormal taste bud function and appetite loss. Common Metformin Side Effects The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal, and include the following: Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Cramps Other common side effects are represented by abnormal stools, muscle pain, changes in taste sensations and occasionally difficulties in breathing. Some patients may experience side effects in the shape of dizziness, light-headedness or flu-like symptoms, while others may have nail problems, palpitations, flushing of the face or an increase in thirst and/ or sweating. Serious Metformin Side Effects Occasionally, patients may experience side effects of a more serious nature. These side effects include allergic reactions, which may be manifested through unexplained swellings hives rashes itching wheezing and / or severe breathing difficulties. In some cases, the Metformin may cause a disturbance in electrolytes, causing the body to function within an acidic environment, a condition known as lactic acidosis. Often occurring severely and suddenly, lactic acidosis is the result of increased levels of lactic acid, in particular when Metformin is used to inhibit the process of glucose production, hepatic gluconeogenesis. This condition is sometimes the result of a metformin overdose and can cause severe muscle soreness. Another more serious side effect of metformin is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This occurs in individuals whose bodies are particularly Continue reading >>

In The Past I've Had Allergic Reactions To Metformin And My Current Dr. Had Me Placed On It Again. Should I Be Taking This?

In The Past I've Had Allergic Reactions To Metformin And My Current Dr. Had Me Placed On It Again. Should I Be Taking This?

Hello VMKmaggie, This situation can be very serious. No one should take a medication which they believe they are allergic. Each time body is challenged by the “allergy causing compound”, the stronger the allergic reaction will be. Any questions about being allergic to any medication allergy should be addressed in any and all ways until resolved, meaning that you, the patient, is comfortable in taking the medication. • Never ever take a medication that you feel many have caused you to have an allergic reaction until your questions are resolved. • Prescriber offices (doctors and nurses) are changing over to the electronic record. Allergy information or other information may have been omitted or entered incorrectly. • Ask the office to check your old (hard copy) records. If you know the date that the medication caused the “allergy”, please provide the dates with staff as this will help them in looking through your record. • Another thing that may have happened, is that patients sometimes report how they respond to a medication and call it an allergy, the prescribers doesn’t classify the response as an allergy but as a reaction to the medication and your response may have not have flagged as an “allergy”. • Always clearly describe your response to any medication. • The allergy alert should have also been in the dispensing pharmacy’s computer system. Any allergies and/or reactions to medications should be shared with all the pharmacies/pharmacist s that provides services to you. Pharmacists can many times more rapidly follow up with the prescriber and are an advocate for patients. • Always consult a second opinion if you continue to feel the situation unresolved. • Always keep an updated list of medications, allergies and medication procedures Continue reading >>

Glimepiride (glyburide) Side Effects: What You Need To Know

Glimepiride (glyburide) Side Effects: What You Need To Know

Glimepiride is a sulfonylurea antidiabetic medication drug, also known as a “secretagogue,” that stimulates the beta cells in the pancreas to produce more insulin. Insulin escorts glucose into the cells, preventing the build-up of sugar in the blood. It also increases the activity of insulin receptors inside the cells, thereby increasing insulin sensitivity. Even with all its protective effects, diabetics on this medication may suffer from glimepiride side effects long term and short term. How Glimepiride Works in the Body Glimepiride stimulates the beta cells of the pancreas to secrete insulin. It does so by specifically binding to sulfonylurea receptors of the pancreatic beta cells. This binding initiates a complex chain of events that finally leads to the secretion of insulin by the beta cells. Another, beta cell-independent mechanism of the blood sugar lowering activity of sulfonylureas has also been theorized and studied. It was found that glimepiride increased glucose transport and lipid and glycogen synthesis in adipocytes (fat cells) and muscle cells. This means that glimepiride helps transport glucose efficiently and also helps in its conversion to glycogen to be stored in the liver. Most Prescribed Names in This Category Diabenese, Amaryl, Glynase, Diabeta, Tolinase Glycinorm, Glurib, Euroglip, Digraph and Glicept. How Should This Medicine Be Used Glimepiride is usually taken once a day, either along with breakfast or with the first major meal of the day. Always follow your doctor’s instructions and never take more or less of what has been prescribed to you. Side Effects That Could Happen As Soon As You Start Taking the Medication hypoglycemia (low blood sugar and its related symptoms) weight gain, and allergic reactions, if you are allergic to Sulfa cat Continue reading >>

Possible Side Effects Of Onglyza

Possible Side Effects Of Onglyza

Important Safety Information Do not take ONGLYZA if you: are allergic to any of its ingredients. Serious allergic reactions can occur with ONGLYZA and may include swelling of the face, lips or throat, difficulty swallowing or breathing, swelling of the skin, hives, rash, itching, flaking, or peeling. If you have these symptoms, stop taking ONGLYZA and contact your doctor right away Serious side effects can happen in people who take ONGLYZA: Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) which may be severe and lead to death. Before taking ONGLYZA, tell your doctor if you ever had pancreatitis, gallstones, history of alcoholism, or high triglyceride levels. Stop taking ONGLYZA and contact your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis Heart failure. Before taking ONGLYZA tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure or problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of heart failure: increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing, especially when you lie down; an unusually fast increase in weight; swelling or fluid retention, especially in the feet, ankles or legs; unusual tiredness Low blood sugar. When ONGLYZA is used with certain other diabetes medicines to treat high blood sugar, such as a sulfonylurea or insulin, the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is higher. Symptoms of low blood sugar include shaking, hunger, sweating, headache, rapid heartbeat, change in mood, and change in vision. Follow your doctor’s instructions for treating low blood sugar Joint pain. Some people who take medicines Continue reading >>

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