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Metformin Side Effects Gout

[use Of Metformin (siofor) In Patients With Gout And Insulin Resistance (pilot 6-month Results)].

[use Of Metformin (siofor) In Patients With Gout And Insulin Resistance (pilot 6-month Results)].

Abstract AIM: To evaluate metformin efficacy and safety in patients with gout and insulin resistance (IR). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The trial included 26 patients with gout (criteria of the American collage of rheumatologists) and IR (index HOMA). The inclusion criteria were the following: absence of antigout therapy, normal hepatic and renal function, rejection of alcohol. The drug dose was 1500 mg/day. The study was made of anthropometric and clinical characteristics, 24-h blood pressure monitoring, blood tests for uric acid, glucose, insulin, urea, creatinin, alaninaminotransferase, aspartataminotransferase, lipid spectrum at the first and further visits. RESULTS: A 6-month metformin therapy significantly changed the levels of glucose, insulin, HDLP and LDLP cholesterol, uric acid, HOMA index. Normouricemia was achieved in 11 patients, a significant lowering of uric acid--in 12 patients. The number of affected joints in 23 patients reduced from 4 (1-5) to 1 (0-2), p < 0.01. Seven patients with achieved normouricemia had no arthritis attacks. In 3 of 10 patients with chronic arthritis joint inflammation persisted. Six patients had dyspepsia during the first week of therapy, 1 patient discontinued the drug because of persistent diarrhea. CONCLUSION: Metformin therapy is safe. It reduces IR. The principal result of the study was lowering of uric acid and attenuation of the articular syndrome. Continue reading >>

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Tradjenta include cough, weight gain, muscle or joint pain, headache, low blood sugar. Tradjenta may cause serious side effects, including: inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis, symptoms include severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), fever, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. The recommended dose of Tradjenta is 5 mg once daily. Tradjenta may interact with bosentan, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, quinidine, verapamil, rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine, St. John's wort, phenobarbital and other barbiturates, medication to treat HIV or AIDS, medicines to treat narcolepsy, medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, seizure medications, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol), sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or other oral diabetes medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Tradjenta; it is not expected to harm an unborn baby. It is unknown if Tradjenta passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Brand Name(s): | IMPORTANT WARNING | WHY is this medicine prescribed? | HOW should this medicine be used? | Are there OTHER USES for this medicine? | What SPECIAL DIETARY instructions should I follow? | What should I do IF I FORGET to take a dose? | What SIDE EFFECTS can this medicine cause? | What should I know about STORAGE and DISPOSAL of this medication? | What should I do in case of OVERDOSE? | What OTHER INFORMATION should I know? | ahfsCopyRight Brand Name(s): Fortamet® Glucophage® Glumetza® Riomet® Actoplus Met®(as a combination product containing Metformin, Pioglitazone) Avandamet®(as a combination product containing Metformin, Rosiglitazone) Invokamet®(as a combination product containing Canagliflozin, Metformin) Janumet®(as a combination product containing Metformin, Sitagliptin) Jentadueto®(as a combination product containing Linagliptin, Metformin) Kombiglyze®XR (as a combination product containing Metformin, Saxagliptin) Metaglip®(as a combination product containing Glipizide, Metformin)¶ Prandimet®(as a combination product containing Metformin, Repaglinide) Xigduo®XR (as a combination product containing Dapagliflozin, Metformin) IMPORTANT WARNING Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are over 80 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment) or coma; or heart, kidney, or liver disease. Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop tak Continue reading >>

Gout: The Disease Of Kings… And Everyone Else (part 1)

Gout: The Disease Of Kings… And Everyone Else (part 1)

You might be thinking that it’s a little bit odd to be writing about gout on a diabetes Web site. What could the two conditions possibly have in common, you ask? Surprisingly (or perhaps not), quite a bit. Gout is a type of chronic, progressive arthritis that occurs when high levels of uric acid get deposited as crystals around the joints and sometimes, in soft tissue. The uric acid crystals cause an inflammatory type of arthritis that leads to pain (often very intense), redness, and swelling. The most commonly affected joint is the big toe, but the ankle, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows may be, as well. Left untreated, uric acid crystals can form hardened lumps in the joints and in tissues, leading to joint destruction, kidney damage, and kidney stones. Gout has been termed the “disease of kings” because it used to be that royalty and other wealthy folks were afflicted (after dining on too much rich food and drink). Even Saint Gregory the Great suffered from this painful condition. However, gout doesn’t discriminate: According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2008, almost 4% of adult Americans have had gout at some point. Men suffer more than women (6% of men versus 2% of women). And gout is on the increase. Gout and Diabetes Linking gout with diabetes isn’t anything new. In fact, the possibility of a connection was established in the late 18th century. But it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to make sense of this connection: As overweight and obesity increase, so does the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and gout. People with gout and people with Type 2 diabetes share some common risk factors: • Being overweight or obese (for the most part) • Not getting enough physical activity • High uric acid levels • Insulin Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

A drug widely prescribed to those with diabetes could cause thyroid, heart and a host of other health problems, a study has warned. Metformin is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. But new research, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found the drug is linked to having an underactive thyroid. And the increased risk of producing low levels of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), can lead to complications, scientists have warned. The condition can cause heart disease, goitre - a lump in the throat caused by a swollen thyroid - pregnancy problems and a life-threatening condition called myxoedema coma. Both men and women can have an underactive thyroid, though the condition is more common in women. In the UK, it affects 15 in every 1,000 women and one in 1,000 men. The condition can also develop in children. The amount of metformin an individual needs to control blood sugar levels is worked out by a person's doctor or diabetes team. However, some previous research has raised concerns that the drug may lower thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. The study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, examined data on 74,300 patients who received metformin and sulfonylurea, another common diabetes drug, over a 25-year study period. Of these people, 5,689 were being treated for an underactive thyroid, and 59,937 had normal thyroid function. In the group with an underactive thyroid, there were 495 incidences of low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (119.7 per 1000) per year compared with 322 in the normal group (4.5 per 1000). In patients with a treated underactive thyroid, metformin was associated with a 55 per cent increased risk of low TSH levels compared with treatment wit Continue reading >>

Ava-hydrochlorothiazide

Ava-hydrochlorothiazide

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Hydrochlorothiazide belongs to the group of medications called diuretics. It is also an antihypertensive. It is used to decrease fluid retention (edema) caused by congestive heart failure, certain kidney or liver problems, and medications such as corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone) and estrogen. It is also used to lower high blood pressure. Hydrochlorothiazide works by making the body lose excess water and salt. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Ava-Hydrochlorothiazide is no longer being manufactured for sale in Canada. For brands that may still be available, search under hydrochlorothiazide. This article is being kept available for reference purposes only. If you are using this medication, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for information about your treatment options. How should I use this medication? To reduce fluid retention (edema), the usual recommended adult dose of hydrochlorothiazide is 25 Continue reading >>

Causes Of High Uric Acid, Associated Problems, And Fixes

Causes Of High Uric Acid, Associated Problems, And Fixes

While a healthy level (on the high side) of uric acid might correlate with intelligence, elevated uric acid levels can be harmful. Read this post to learn if you should check your uric acid, testing options for it, why uric acid is good or bad, and what to do about it. Contents High Levels of Uric Acid and Diseases Associated with It Causes of High Uric Acid How to Lower Uric Acid Naturally Part 2: Causes of High Uric Acid, Associated Diseases, and Fixes Uric acid (urate) is an end-product of purine degradation in humans. Purines are generated as a final product in the digestion of certain proteins and DNA in the diet, but some are synthesized in the body (R). Uric acid has antioxidant properties but can be pro-oxidant depending on its chemical environment (R). In normal conditions, uric acid is eliminated via urine (R). However, many factors affect the ability of the kidneys to eliminate it efficiently. This results in abnormal blood uric acid levels (too high or too low) High uric acid levels have been linked to (R): Kidney stones Gout High blood pressure Kidney disease Obesity Diabetes Cognitive dysfunction Source: (R) Uric acid is the last step in the breakdown pathway of purines. Purines are converted to hypoxanthine, then to xanthine and finally, to uric acid. For the last two steps in conversion, we need the enzyme xanthine oxidase (uricase). Humans have a mutation that prevents the production of the enzyme that destroys uric acid (uricase) (R). Consequently, humans have higher urate levels (around 240–360 μM) compared to other mammals (around 30–50 μM in mice) (R). Source: (R) Uric acid is removed via the kidney and the gut: through urine (70%) and feces (30%) (R). A uric acid blood test is the most common test used to monitor people who have (R): Gout Lik Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Mixing Medication

The Dangers Of Mixing Medication

One body, multiple drugs: It can be a recipe for disaster. If you have multiple health problems you are likely taking multiple medications. And if you’re taking multiple drugs, some of them probably have the potential to interact, says Donald Miller, PharmD, professor and chairman of pharmacy practice in the College of Pharmacy Practice at North Dakota State University. Although people of any age can have multiple health problems that require several medications – and thus have an increased risk of interactions among those medications – the risk increases with age. A study of adults in the United States showed that more than 90 percent of people 65 or older use at least one medication per week, more than 40 percent use five or more medications, and 10 percent use 12 or more. "It's not unusual to see people with arthritis taking a dozen drugs. And if they're taking that many, I can usually find three or four that have the potential to interact," says Miller. The Actions of Interactions Taking two or more medications can lead to a drug–drug interaction that can either amplify, or conversely, block the effect of one of the drugs you're taking. The interaction could cause too much of one drug to remain in your system, essentially producing an overdose or, if one drug can’t be absorbed or metabolized properly, the interaction renders the drug ineffective. Another danger is, if the side effects are similar, they can add up. For example, if you take allopurinol (Lopurin or Zyloprim) for gout and add the drug azathioprine (Imuran) to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the azathioprine can further suppress your immune system, possibly putting you at risk of a serious infection. And, both aspirin and the blood-thinning drug warfarin (Coumadin) decrease your blood's abilit Continue reading >>

Allopurinol - Oral, Zyloprim

Allopurinol - Oral, Zyloprim

allopurinol - oral, Zyloprim GENERIC NAME: ALLOPURINOL - ORAL (AL-oh-PURE-i-nol) BRAND NAME(S): Zyloprim USES: Allopurinol is used to treat gout and certain types of kidney stones. It is also used to prevent increased uric acid levels in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. These patients can have increased uric acid levels due to release of uric acid from the dying cancer cells. Allopurinol works by reducing the amount of uric acid made by the body. Increased uric acid levels can cause gout and kidney problems. HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. Take this medication after a meal to reduce stomach upset. If your dose is more than 300 milligrams a day, you will need to take several smaller doses during the day to get this amount (ask your doctor for directions).It is best to drink a full glass of water with each dose and at least 8 more glasses (8 ounces each) of fluid a day. If your doctor has directed you to drink less fluid for other medical reasons, consult your doctor for further instructions. Your doctor may also instruct you on how to decrease acid in your urine (e.g., avoiding large amounts of ascorbic acid/vitamin C).Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day.For the treatment of gout, it may take up to several weeks for this medicine to have an effect. You may have more gout attacks for several months after starting this medicine while the body removes extra uric acid. Allopurinol is not a pain reliever. To relieve pain from gout, continue to take your prescribed medicines for gout attacks (e.g., colchicine, ibuprofen, indomethacin) as directed by your doc Continue reading >>

Gout: Never Have An Attack Again

Gout: Never Have An Attack Again

Gout is a condition that commonly effects both men and women as they age, especially this time of year during the holidays when we all tend to over-indulge in rich foods and alcohol. And now the good news: you never have to suffer from gout again. What it is, and how your other doctor treats it Gout is the deposition of uric acid crystals in joints, most commonly the big toe, and can be debilitating due to the extreme pain it can cause. Uric acid is a breakdown product of purines (see below for the list of foods that contain high levels) and is broken down by an enzyme called xanthine oxidase. Allopurinol is a typical drug used in the treatment of gout as it blocks the action of xanthine oxidase, thereby decreasing the amount of uric acid crystals being produced. NSAID’s are often used for pain management, as is colchicine, for their anti-inflammatory effects. How you can treat it, naturally Even if you do some of the following, you will decrease the severity and frequency of your attacks. Lifestyle Lose some weight and improve your blood pressure – hyperuricemia (elevated levels of uric acid in blood) is associated with abdominal obesity and hypertension Improve your blood lipid and glucose levels- hyperuricemia is also associated with dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. If you’re on a lipid medication (most commonly a statin), or a prescription for type II diabetes (most commonly metformin), then there’s work to be done Diet Increase water intake – not only will this decrease uric acid levels, but it will help with your blood pressure as well Increase consumption of cherries or unsweetened cherry juice – consuming the equivalent 6 cups of cherries daily can reduce your uric acid levels to normal in 3 months Eliminate alcohol – this does not go over well Continue reading >>

Olmetec Plus

Olmetec Plus

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? This is a combination product that contains 2 medications: olmesartan and hydrochlorothiazide. It is used to lower high blood pressure. Olmesartan belongs to the class of medications called angiotensin II receptor blockers and helps to lower blood pressure by blocking the action of a chemical (angiotensin II) that causes blood vessels to constrict or tighten, thereby relaxing blood vessels. Hydrochlorothiazide belongs to the class of medications called diuretics or "water pills" and helps control blood pressure by getting rid of excess salt and water. This combination medication is used to treat mild to moderate high blood pressure for people who require treatment with both olmesartan and hydrochlorothiazide. This medication is most often used when a person has taken olmesartan and hydrochlorothiazide as separate medications without any problems. When blood pressure is allowed to remain high for a long time, the blood vessels of the heart, kidneys, and brain may become damaged. This puts a person at increased risk for heart attack and stroke as well as kidney failure and blindness. Keeping blood pressure in the normal range can reduce the risk for these conditions. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to Continue reading >>

Chlorthalidone

Chlorthalidone

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Chlorthalidone belongs to the group of medications called diuretics. It is also an antihypertensive. This medication is used to treat fluid retention (edema) occurring with congestive heart failure and disorders of the liver and kidney. It is also used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. Chlorthalidone works by making the body lose excess water and salt. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than the ones listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? This medication is available as a 50 mg tablet. How should I use this medication? The usual recommended dose of chlorthalidone is 25 mg to 100 mg once daily or in divided doses. Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones given here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor. Continue reading >>

Forxiga (dapagliflozin)

Forxiga (dapagliflozin)

What is Forxiga used for? Forxiga tablets can be used on their own to improve blood sugar control in people whose blood sugar is not controlled by changes to their diet and exercise alone, and who can't take an antidiabetic medicine called metformin. Forxiga tablets can also be used for people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not sufficiently controlled by other antidiabetic medicines. It can be added to treatment with metformin, a sulphonylurea such as gliclazide or glibenclamide, or to treatment with insulin. How does Forxiga work? Forxiga tablets contain the active ingredient dapagliflozin, which is a type of medicine called an SGLT2 inhibitor. In type 2 diabetes the cells in the body become resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It makes cells in the body remove sugar from the blood. When the cells are resistant to insulin this makes blood sugar levels rise too high. Dapagliflozin works in the kidneys, where it allows the body to excrete excess sugar from the blood into the urine. Normally, when the kidneys filter and clean the blood, glucose is filtered out of the blood at the same time. The glucose is then reabsorbed back into the blood by a mechanism called the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2). The kidneys normally reabsorb glucose back into the blood even when the levels of glucose in the blood are too high, as in diabetes. Dapagliflozin works by inhibiting the SGLT2 transporter. This allows excess glucose to be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine. This will reduce blood sugar levels. Dapagliflozin has two other effects that may be of benefit for people with diabetes. Firstly, it may cause weight loss due to the loss of sugar from the b Continue reading >>

Medications That Cause A Metallic Taste In The Mouth

Medications That Cause A Metallic Taste In The Mouth

Along with their desired actions, medications can also produce unwanted side effects. Many medications may cause an abnormal taste in the mouth, known as dysgeusia, which can interfere with the enjoyment of food and intake of adequate nutrition. A metallic taste is one of the most common types of dysgeusia. It can occur with a variety of medications ranging from antibiotics to cancer medications. Video of the Day Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are medications used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure. These commonly prescribed drugs may cause a metallic taste in the mouth and other taste disturbances, such as partial loss of taste perception. Captopril (Capoten), one of many different ACE inhibitors, causes taste disturbances in approximately 2 to 4 percent of people taking the drug, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescribing information. Other ACE inhibitors that may cause a metallic taste in the mouth include lisinopril (Zestril), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), trandolapril (Mavik), quinapril (Accupril) and ramipril (Altace), notes the Cleveland Clinic. Taste disturbances often resolve with continued use of ACE inhibitors. Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the most commonly prescribed oral medications for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The FDA-approved prescribing information indicates that approximately 3 percent of people experience a metallic taste in the mouth when beginning metformin drug therapy. This side effect typically resolves with continued use of the medication. A metallic taste in the mouth and other taste abnormalities may occur while taking certain antibiotics. Three frequently prescribed antibiotics associated with this side effect include clarithromycin (Biaxin), metronidazole (Flagy Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin Used For And Is It Safe?

What Is Metformin Used For And Is It Safe?

Metformin is considered the gold standard for type 2 diabetes treatment and is used alongside diet and exercise to help lower blood sugar. It works by helping to improve your body’s response to insulin. It also decreases the production of sugar in the liver and prevents absorption of sugar in the digestive tract. Metformin is sometimes also used to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome and obesity, and to prevent diabetes in those people who are at risk. However, these uses are “off label,” meaning they are not approved by the FDA. Is metformin safe? There are many adverse effects associated with using metformin, and some can be serious. The most common adverse effects involve gastrointestinal symptoms; one study found that young people using metformin had a 26% chance of having gastrointestinal symptoms, double the chance of those in the control group.[1] Common side effects of metformin include: Stomach and abdominal discomfort Diarrhea Gas Nausea Bloating Reduced appetite Heartburn Headache If any of these side effects are severe or persist, talk with your doctor. Stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately if you experience any of these more rare, but very serious side effects: Chest pain Rash Tiredness Lightheaded Shortness of breath Irregular heartbeat Sever muscle pain Weakness Some of these symptoms could be associated with a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis, which can in rare cases be caused by metformin use. Metformin alters gut bacteria A recent study found that some of the effects – both good and bad – associated with metformin have to do with the way the drug alters gut bacterial communities. While some changes made by metformin on the microbiome may aid in its therapeutic, blood-sugar-lowering effects, other chang Continue reading >>

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