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Metformin Shortness Of Breath

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Shortness Of Breath | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Shortness Of Breath | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community For the past 5 months I have had a shortness of breath, getting breathless walking up stairs etc. I recently got diagnosed with T2 and the doc is now saying it's the additional weight I put on. I play American football and was lifting/training 5 days, have always been heavier cause of my sport and never had an issue with breathing, so why now, I can't get my head round it!! For the past 5 months I have had a shortness of breath, getting breathless walking up stairs etc. I recently got diagnosed with T2 and the doc is now saying it's the additional weight I put on. I play American football and was lifting/training 5 days, have always been heavier cause of my sport and never had an issue with breathing, so why now, I can't get my head round it!! When your blood sugars are too high, lots of things go awry including both the ability and desire to exercise, getting hot on exertion, shortness of breath. and generally feeling much older than you did before. Luckily all of that is resolvable by getting the glucose back down. its possible to d that fairly easily by adopting a low carb way of life. There is a program on here which shows you exactly how to d that. If you give that try you should find you feel better and slimmer in no time! My doctors have always told me that my weight was the reason for anything troubling me. Even when I had a 24 inch waist - it never made any sense to me, and always proved to be something real when I got someone to pay attention. Breathlessness when you are exercising and fairly fit - particularly if it came on rather suddenly, is not a symptom of diabetes. I think you need to go back to your doctor. You might feel better if yo Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects On The Heart

Metformin Side Effects On The Heart

Metformin, sold under the brand name Glucophage, is an anti-hyperglycemic medication used alone or in combination with other medication, such as insulin, to control blood glucose levels in those with Type 2 diabetes. It belongs in the biguanide class of medication. According to Drugs.com, metformin works by decreasing the amount of glucose obtained from food and glucose produced by the liver, lowering blood glucose levels. Video of the Day According to DiabetesNet.com, the chemical structure of metformin resembles that of the French lilac plant, which was used long ago to lower blood sugar but found to be too toxic. Metformin is shorter-acting than French lilac and can in rare cases produce the same toxic reaction, called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis--which can be fatal--is a condition in which there is too much lactate in the blood, which lowers the pH. It can occur when metformin levels build up and cannot be cleared from the body. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include slow heartbeat, or bradycardia, and low blood pressure, or hypoptension. Other symptoms include shallow breathing, diarrhea and extreme weakness and fatigue. Alcohol consumption and a reaction with the medication Tagamet can increase the chances for lactic acidosis to develop. Metformin should not be taken by those with congestive heart failure or heart disease. Chest pain is a rare but serious side effect of taking metformin, according to PubMed Health. Notify your physician immediately if you experience any chest pain while taking metformin. Metformin has been well studied in many clinical trials and found to be safe in most instances. The side effects reported by those taking metformin are compared against any side effects experienced by those taking a placebo. It has been determined that taking th Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Could My Metformin Be Causing Me To Have Trouble Breathing?

Could My Metformin Be Causing Me To Have Trouble Breathing?

Could my Metformin be causing me to have trouble breathing? I need some medication advice. I'm taking 1,000 mg of Metformin a day and lately I've been having trouble breathing and not feeling like doing stuff at all. It sort of feels the way you would if you were in high altitude. Headache, shortness of breath, etc. Could the Metforming be causing this reaction? I read... show more I need some medication advice. I'm taking 1,000 mg of Metformin a day and lately I've been having trouble breathing and not feeling like doing stuff at all. It sort of feels the way you would if you were in high altitude. Headache, shortness of breath, etc. Could the Metforming be causing this reaction? I read where it could cause something called lactic acidosis so I was worried it might be that. I can't call the doctor yet cause its too early but was wondering if anyone here knew something about Metformin. Thanks alot. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: from "Some people have developed a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting." It is very unlikely that it's the metformin. lactic acidosis is something different all together. Tell your doctor about the symptoms that you are feeling. The doctor should run a few blood test to make sure your hormone levels are normal. YES!!! Metformin can contribute to hypoxia as a result of lactic acidosis, and being short of breath is an indicator. Do NOT take any more metformin until you have seen your doctor, and do that today. Now that you mention, I do feel slightly out of b Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Janumet 100 mg-50 mg oblong, red, imprinted with 577 What is the most important information I should know about metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or sitagliptin (Januvia), if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and sitagliptin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. The combination of metformin and sitagliptin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking metformin and sitagliptin? Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. As I have posted earlier, I am feeling very low, sluggish, lot of body pains and dizzy from a few months and it has increased from the past month. Newly added is rapid heart beat and shortness of breath. At times I wondered if it is cardiac related also. But last night I didn't take my metformin 500mg which I have been taking twice a day from the past two weeks. And amazingly, I felt soooo better in the morning, no usual pounding headache or dizziness, so I skipped metformin at noon too, just to see what's going on. And I feel great with my normal energy levels and no headache or pains. I even had a pecan cake and mango juice high in sugar and carbs in the evening. Even then the bg levels are normal and no other symptoms. So could all these symptoms be the side effects of metformin?? If so, what should I do..I know I have to talk to my doctor but before that should I discontinue using it? And what would be the alternative if I can't take metformin? Or does all this mean that the metformin is actually working? Metformin takes a week or more to take full effect on blood sugars. likewise it takes a several days to wear off. You may notice a difference in your intestines the next day, but for blood sugars it's a dif story. I looked up metformin and some of the side effects are (from drugs.com): Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting. Stop using metformin and get emergency medical help if you have any of these s Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Dapagliflozin And Metformin

Dapagliflozin And Metformin

Pronunciation: DAP a gli FLOE zin and met FOR min What is the most important information I should know about dapagliflozin and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have moderate to severe kidney disease, if you are on dialysis, or if you have metabolic acidosis. Dapagliflozin and metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking dapagliflozin and metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Dapagliflozin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Dapagliflozin works by helping the kidneys get rid of glucose from your bloodstream. Metformin lowers glucose production in the liver and also causes your intestines to absorb less glucose. Dapagliflozin and metformin is a combination medicine used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Dapagliflozin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dapagliflozin and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to dapagliflozin (Farxiga) or metformin (Glucophage, Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Glucovance, Jentadueto, Kombiglyze, Metaglip, and others), or if you have: moderate to severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); or metabo Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure). Less serious side effects may include: cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat; headache, dizziness; mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, st Continue reading >>

Arm, Chest Pain And Shortness Of Breath. Metformin

Arm, Chest Pain And Shortness Of Breath. Metformin

Arm, Chest Pain And Shortness Of Breath. Metformin Seriously, Mary is right... it's like saying you're slightly pregnant, you either are or you're not! lol I'm glad too that you're seeing your doctor! "The real secret of success is enthusiasm..." thanks, Walter P. Chrysler. I believe it. That's what I want in my life--to give my imagination a chance, to live with energy and enthusiasm! P.S. I looked up enthusiasm, and it says the root words mean God within... interesting...! Ralph Waldo Emerson said 'Life belongs to the energetic.' But you don't have to be frenetic and hyper--some energy is quiet and steady, like a heartbeat... and that works too! LOL Good luck at the doctors! Please let us know how you are feeling. You can often change your circumstances by changing your attitude. "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." "A man is but the product of his thoughts what he thinks, he becomes." thank you for getting back to us on that and that was a wise move what is this only slightly significant stuff?? you know that is like someone telling you you had a slight heart attack or a slight stroke but you are ok lol i am glad you are seeing the doc for sure meanwhile hang out and stay out of trouble!! TODAY IS LIFE THIS IS NOT A DRESS REHEARSAL there is no cause when there is no effect km for that is my day of thrust in the opposite direction - last is just the slowest winner. c.hunter boyd people often say that motivation doesn't last. well neither does bathing - that's why we recommend it daily. zig ziglar I don't know about stress... I live with some serious stress daily... I can't pay my bills, I have no job, I have an ex that does not pay child support on time, a landlord that comes by if I am a day late, my husband is disabled and we don't have his so Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

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