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Metformin Pcos Acne

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) For Pcos?

Glucophage (metformin) For Pcos?

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. hey all! i'm 20 yrs old. i've had acne since i was 16. i recently went to an endocrinologist who did some tests and said i had PCOS. He prescribed me Glucophage, generic Metformin, saying that will regulate my hormones...(i am not diabetic). my next appt. is on monday and i'm going to ask him about spiro since a lot of people seem to have great results on it. i'm pretty skeptical about this Metformin stuff....has anyone else been prescribed this??? hey all! i'm 20 yrs old. i've had acne since i was 16. i recently went to an endocrinologist who did some tests and said i had PCOS. He prescribed me Glucophage, generic Metformin, saying that will regulate my hormones...(i am not diabetic). my next appt. is on monday and i'm going to ask him about spiro since a lot of people seem to have great results on it. i'm pretty skeptical about this Metformin stuff....has anyone else been prescribed this??? Metformin is a very common prescription for those with PCOS, especially for women trying to become pregnant. Most treatments for PCOS are similar to treatment of diabetes (type 2), because PCOS is related to insulin resistance (for example, PCOS might be controlled with diet/ lifestyle changes, supplements to increase insulin sensitivity, metformin, etc). I was on Spironolactone for 2 years, til it gave me a stomach ulcer..so I had to go off of it. It worked VERY well for me in combination with Yasmin for PCOS. Now my endo prescribed Metformin...I too am skeptical about it. I'm not sure if I'm going to fill the prescription or not..but if I don't, my face is sure to flare up again. I wanted to bring this topic back up to discussion--has anyone had success with metformin for pcos related acne? My endo said that it MIGHT w Continue reading >>

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a health condition resulting from a hormonal imbalance that affects approximately one in every 10 to 15 women in the United States. More than half of women with PCOS will have diabetes or prediabetes by age 40. Learn more about the link and how to treat these often-related conditions. Though the exact cause of PCOS is unknown, many scientists believe that a combination of environmental and genetic factors are involved. Your risk may be higher if you are overweight or if your mother, aunt, or sister has PCOS. As Andrea Dunaif, MD, Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai points out, “The name can be confusing and misleading, because not all women with PCOS have cysts on their ovaries.” In fact, many experts and patient advocates are joining an international effort to change the name to something that is more reflective of what PCOS actually is – a metabolic issue. The hope is that having a more accurate name will help further research and improve treatment. Signs and Symptoms Most women are diagnosed in their twenties and thirties, but PCOS often starts in adolescents and can affect girls before they begin menstruating. The hormonal imbalance can interrupt the development and release of eggs from the ovaries. It often goes undiagnosed because many of the symptoms can be attributed to other causes. Common symptoms of PCOS include: Irregular or missed periods Weight gain Fatigue Unwanted hair growth on the face, arms, chest, back, abdomen, and extremities Thinning hair on the head Infertility Acne Mood changes, depression, and anxiety Pelvic pain Headaches Sleep problems such as insomnia, sleep apnea, or poor sleep These symptoms are caused by hormonal im Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Therapy On Hyperandrogenism In Women With Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

Effects Of Metformin Therapy On Hyperandrogenism In Women With Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

Effects of metformin therapy on hyperandrogenism in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine diseases in women. This syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation, infertility and obesity. The association between PCOS-related hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance is well documented in the literature. Insulin resistance and the resulting raised plasma levels of insulin are reported to be responsible for the high androgen concentration observed in patients with PCOS. In this prospective study, blood samples for levels of testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), LH/FSH, prolactin and fasting blood sugar (FBS) before starting metformin administration were obtained randomly from 40 women who were apparently obese, had PCOS and had been referred to a university hospital. Metformin was then given at a dose of 500 mg three times a day for 8 weeks, after which time the pretreatment study was repeated. Clinical symptoms of PCOS, including acne and hirsutism score and body mass index (BMI), were assessed before and after the treatment cycle. Metformin therapy resulted in a significant decrease in total testosterone levels and FBS. There was also a significant decline in BMI, length of the menstrual cycle, acne and hirsutism score. There were no significant changes in the levels of DHEAS, prolactin, FSH or LH, or in LH/FSH. The effect of metformin on subjects with elevated DHEAS levels was different to that on individuals with normal DHEAS levels. In the latter group there were only significant improvements in the leng Continue reading >>

Metformin Acne Treatment

Metformin Acne Treatment

Metformin is an anti-hyperglycemic drug used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes and to treat women with polycystic ovary syndrome (POCS) and hirsutism, excessive or unwanted facial or body hair. Metformin also has benefits in treating acne in patients with hyperandrogenism or excessive production of androgen. Hyperandrogenenism causes acne vulgaris, which is the increased accumulation of oil and bacteria in the skin pores and the formation of papules, pustules or nodules. Video of the Day Metformin was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1995 only for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. According to the Northwestern University website, metformin is not FDA approved to treat POCS symptoms. However, treatment with metformin benefits women suffering with POCS because of its effect in reducing insulin, testosterone and glucose levels. These effects help to reduce the symptoms of acne, hirsutism, abdominal obesity and amenorrhea that are all symptoms of POCS. Metformin Effects on Acne Metformin is used to treat acne in specific conditions such as PCOS, which causes serious hormonal imbalances that cause acne outbreaks. Metformin works to balance the hormones and control the acne outbreaks. The side effects of metformin include gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea and vomiting, abdominal bloating and diarrhea. These symptoms may be minimized by starting with a low dosage that is gradually increased over a few weeks. Metformin will also affect the absorption of vitamin B12; long-term treatment with metformin may lead to anemia. A rare and serious side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis, too much acid in the body. Therefore, it’s important to have a serum creatinine test prior to starting metformin therapy and to have liver enzymes levels monitored ever Continue reading >>

Fig. 7. Relapse Of Acne On Stopping Metformin; Improvement On Treatment Restart

Fig. 7. Relapse Of Acne On Stopping Metformin; Improvement On Treatment Restart

Before 2002 the standard treatment advice for my patients was the anti-androgenic combined contraceptive pill as mentioned in the introduction. The pill was stopped when the woman wanted to become pregnant; usually the previous symptoms recurred while waiting for (in many cases, only hoping for) conception. Between 2002 and 2006 I offered the insulin sensitizer metformin treatment to all freshly diagnosed PCOS patients who had contraindications or negative experience with the pill, or simply did not want to take hormonally active medication, or wanted to become pregnant. The efficacy of the two treatment forms (the pill or metformin) was compared in those who completed twelve moths treatment. The two groups were comparable in size and age distribution. Table 2 shows the results. Both the acne and hirsutism scores decreased significantly during the twelve-month treatment period; BMI and W/H did not change significantly in either group. Further statistical analysis was not made since the two groups differed in the indication of treatment; and the metformin group had more severe symptoms in average. However, this study convinced me that metformin was a simple, safe; and effective first choice of medical treatment in PCOS. In many patients metformin restored the regularity of the menstrual cycles. Spontaneous pregnancies with live births also occurred (Petrnyi, 2005; Petrnyi & Zaoura, 2007). Since 2006 lifestyle changes (Tang & al., 2006) have been advised parallel to the pharmacological treatment for all new patients: the increase of daily physical activity and low glycaemic index diet; including calorie restriction to the overweight. The two treatment forms (metformin with or without lifestyle changes) were compared in the following way (Petrnyi & Zaoura, 2011). Patients Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Acne And Metformin? | Dailystrength

Acne And Metformin? | Dailystrength

Hey girls, so ive never had trouble with acne and recently I was told to take Metformin does Metformin cause breakouts? Im fine with having a pimple or two every now and than, but I have like 10 pimples on my face, and there really really red. Ive only been taking Metformin for two weeks now. HELP! :( Metformin does not help with acne. Metformin when taken for PCOS will help you to regulate your blood sugar levels, which is a common problem with women who have PCOS. Metformin is given so that you can start to lose weight and help to reverse your PCOS. To help reduce your acne you need to change/reverse two things that are going on in your body. One you have to adjust your PH level, as this can effect your skin in many way. Two you have to adjust your hormone levels, as this greatly effects your skin (think about kids who have just hit puberty and how there skin tends to be). One way that you can do this is by taking birth control pills. These can help control your hormones and help clear your skin. Although some women with PCOS can have extreme mood swings on birth control, and this does not help if you are trying to conceive. So another way that you can help your skin is with supplements. There are a few on the market that are designed to help with acne and these could work, but the best way would be to take supplements that are designed to help PCOS and in turn acne from PCOS (this is what I am doing). Another way that you can help control your acne is with your diet. Whole foods full of vitamins and minerals will help your skin as well. Avoid processed foods and foods containing added hormones (like milk). Also have a good facial cleansing product that is designed for acne and wash your face twice a day. This will at first make things worse as it cleans out your pou Continue reading >>

Pcos + Acne: What You Need To Know

Pcos + Acne: What You Need To Know

Copyright 2017 The Pretty Pimple, All Rights Reserved. Lets be real: going through puberty is hard. Your body goes through tons of physical changes, plus your hormones are raging, which only makes things worse. Youve got irregular periods, way more hair than you ever thought possible, probably some weight gain, and horrible acne. Sometimes this is just a phase that teens and pre-teens ride out while leaning on good friends, Advil, and a strong heating pad. But for about one in ten women, these symptoms dont subside, or even lay low until well into their twenties. The culprit? Polycystic ovarian syndrome , otherwise known as PCOS. Acne is one of the most visible effects of PCOS, along with excess body and facial hair. However, PCOS is often misdiagnosed as another condition, and rarely brought up in a primary care doctors office until symptoms become severe. A huge number of PCOS patients remain undiagnosed, leaving many unknowingly suffering the skincare and reproductive consequences of the disease without a proper treatment plan. Theres loads of information out there about PCOS, its symptoms, causes, side effects, and more. In this story, were going to cover the basics and specifically discuss how PCOS affects your skin. PCOS is a hormonal disorder thats caused by genetics, excess insulin, low-grade inflammation, and/or excess production of the hormone androgen (the term male hormones is commonly used to refer to androgen). Irregular periods are the most common symptom of PCOS, though the exact length of a menstrual cycle differs from patient to patient. Other side effects characteristic of PCOS include excess hair growth, gestational diabetes, high blood pressure during pregnancy, miscarriage, liver inflammation, cardiovascular complications, type 2 diabetes, sleep a Continue reading >>

Spironolactone For Pcos: Benefits And Side Effects

Spironolactone For Pcos: Benefits And Side Effects

Take Your First Step to a PCOD-Free Life! This program is available only in India, for now Know More Spironolactone For PCOS: Benefits And Side Effects Spironolactone for PCOS Hirsutism and Acne: The Final Verdict PCOS symptoms like facial and body hair andacneare a result of high levels of male hormones.Spironolactone is believed to be effective against excess male hormones. While the drug has been used for more than three decades for PCOS, it comes with certain side effects. A major embarrassing symptom of PCOS is hirsutism , or the sprouting of hair on the face, chest, and stomach. Excess hair growth inPCOS patients is a result of the high levels of male hormones (androgens) in them. For this reason, the pattern of hair growth is similar to that seen in men. Androgens also cause acne . Doctors often prescribe a drug called spironolactone for the treatment for hirsutism in PCOS. Spironolactone (Aldactone) is a water pill, or diuretic that is usually used to reduce swelling due to excess fluid buildup. It is prescribed for diseases like liver cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and nephrotic syndrome (a kidney disorder). This drug also has an androgen-lowering effect on the body, and hence it is prescribed for PCOS symptoms like acne and hirsutism. How Spironolactone Helps Treat PCOS Hirsutism and Acne? The effectiveness of spironolactone to treat moderate to severe hirsutism was reported in 1982. Positive effects were seen within two months of treatment. In 1986, a study was done to assess the efficacy of spironolactone in the treatment of acne in women with PCOS. Spironolactone was found to significantly improve acne by reducing the levels of male hormones. Spironolactone acts by blocking testosterone receptors as well decreasing the production of testosterone. The Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) And Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) And Pcos

Metformin (Glucophage) is a pharmaceutical drug originally developed to treat elevated blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 Diabetes. It is now commonly prescribed for women with PCOS. Potential side effects of Metformin include: Gastrointestinal side effects such as diarrhea, gas and bloating, abdominal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. Decreased Vitamin B12 absorption that can potentially lead to anemia. Increased levels of amino acids in the blood, which is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Contraindications in using Metformin include liver disease, alcoholism, compromised renal function, hypoxic conditions, and moderate to severe infections. There is an alternative to using Metformin. Metformin (Glucophage) is a pharmaceutical drug often prescribed for women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome). It is an insulin-sensitizing biguanide commonly used to treat elevated blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 Diabetes. It is often used as an off-label prescription for PCOS, which means it was originally used only for individuals with Type 2 Diabetes, but is now prescribed for PCOS patients because it has similar actions in both groups. If you have PCOS, you may have Insulin Resistance. If you have Insulin Resistance the ability of your cells to respond to the action of insulin in transporting glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into muscle and tissue is diminished. Metformin improves the cell’s response to insulin and helps move glucose into the cell. As a result, your body is not required to make as much insulin.1 PCOS and its symptoms of hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, alopecia), reproductive disorders (irregular menses, anovulation, infertility, polycystic ovaries), and metabolic disturbances (weight gain) have been linked to hyperinsulinemia and In Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pcos Acne

Metformin For Pcos Acne

A touch of acne about once a month is a common occurrence for millions of women of child-bearing age who do not have PCOS (polycystic ovarian disease). A touch of acne about once a month is a common occurrence for millions of women of child-bearing age who do not have PCOS (polycystic ovarian disease). A real problem with acne that just won't go away no matter the time of month is a frequent complication of polycystic ovarian syndrome. The cause of PCOS acne is elevated levels of testosterone. This masculinizing hormone is produced in the bodies of both males and females, especially during the teenage years. In addition to causing hair growth, muscle growth, and aggressive mood, it also thickens and toughens the skin. Testosterone makes the skin grow over pores, trapping oil and bacteria inside. The immediate result is a whitehead. (A blackhead is an open pore in which the oil has darkened after exposure to the air.) The bacteria inside the pore can cause inflammation and infection resulting in a pimple. Testosterone is a bigger factor in acne in adults than in teens. This hormone can cause the thicken and toughen at any time of life, but teenage skin is still growing fast. Adult skin is slower to respond to skincare adult acne treatment and any underlying hormonal imbalance has a really persistent effect. Metformin helps control PCOS acne. It's inexpensive. It's safe for almost all women who need to take it. It does not add any female hormones to the system. It only helps bring the production of testosterone in a woman's body back down to normal levels. Metformin does this in two different ways. It stops the ovaries from making testosterone from a chemical called androstenedione. This helps reduce acne and hair growth. It also makes cells all over the body-except in t Continue reading >>

Pcos And Acne - What Can Be Done? | Pcos Diet Support

Pcos And Acne - What Can Be Done? | Pcos Diet Support

There have been a number of women in the PCOS Diet Support Community who are struggling with Acne, in spite of following a good PCOS diet and taking their supplements. Basically, they are doing everything they can do to manage their testosterone levels naturally. So Ive said that Ill investigate PCOS and Acne and I thought I would share my findings with you as well so we can all benefit. Acne is a skin condition that results in lesions or cysts forming on the skin ( 1 ). It normally forms in areas of the skin where there are the most sebaceous glands (glands located within the hair follicle that secrete an oily substance to lubricate and waterproof the skin) ( 2 ). These areas tend to be the face, back and upper part of the chest. There are a couple of factors at play in the formation of acne ( 3 ): Basically, your pores can get blocked by dead skin cells that dont slough away. Your pores can become infected by a kind of bacteria that causes acne. The sebaceous glands can become over active as a result of high testosterone levels. General inflammation can result in the development of acne ( 4 ). You can see where Im going with this, cant you? One research study has found that 27% of all women with acne also have a diagnosis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome ( 5 ). The thing is, we know that PCOS raises our testosterone levels. Its this high testosterone that causes the sebaceous glands to produce too much of the oily sebum, resulting in acne. We also tend to get acne in certain areas that are particularly sensitive to hormones like on our jawline, cheeks, chin and the angles of the neck in particular. Also, instead of getting small bumps on our skin, we get tender knots under the skin that take time to go away ( 6 ). So, we know that Acne and PCOS often go hand in hand an Continue reading >>

Hair & Acne - Management & Treatment

Hair & Acne - Management & Treatment

Excessive facial and/or body hair, scalp hair loss and increased acne due to high levels of androgens can be distressing. There is a range of options to assist you: Cosmetic treatments Creams or gels which reduce pore blocking, oil production by the skin and inflammation can be used to treat acne. Waxing, laser hair removal and electrolysis can be useful measures for reducing hair growth. Of these, laser is the treatment most likely to result in a significant reduction in excess hair growth, but repeated treatments are needed over time, and treatment can be costly. If considering laser hair removal it is important to have this performed by a trained professional who uses the correct machine or technique for your skin type. Some dermatologist practices offer laser hair removal and have particular expertise in treating women with PCOS. They will be able to tell you whether laser hair removal will work on your skin type. Medical treatments Scalp hair loss, excess hair and acne can be can be treated by: Reducing the amount of androgens circulating in the body using: Hormonal contraception Lifestyle changes leading to weight loss which helps to reduce insulin resistance Medications to reduce insulin resistance Reducing the action of the androgens on the body tissues using anti–androgen drugs such as cyproterone acetate, spironolactone, finasteride - these drugs are only used in more severe cases (see below for more detail on each of these) How hormonal contraception works on hair & acne Hormonal contraception in the form of the oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') reduces ovarian production of testosterone and other androgens, in addition to increasing the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is a protein which binds tightly to testosterone in the Continue reading >>

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