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Type 2 Diabetes: Medication Side Effects Stops A Third Of Patients From Taking Drugs

Type 2 Diabetes: Medication Side Effects Stops A Third Of Patients From Taking Drugs

Almost a third of diabetes patients aren’t taking their prescribed medication, metformin, due to its side effects, researchers have revealed. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed drug to treat type 2 diabetes, can lead to gastrointestinal side effects, including diarrhoea and flatulence, said scientists from the University of Surrey. The drug had the lowest level of patient compliance of all diabetes medication studied, with 30 per cent of diabetics choosing to not take their medication. Patients not taking their medication because of side effects should speak to their GP or nurse, to discuss changing to different drugs, they urged. “The importance of diabetes patients taking their prescribed medication cannot be underestimated,” said Clinical Researcher Dr Andy McGovern. “A failure to do so can lead to complications in their condition including eye disease and kidney damage. “Medication which is not taken does no good for the patient but still costs the NHS money, so this is an important issue. "We have known for a long time that a lot of medication prescribed for chronic diseases never actually get taken. What this latest research suggests is that patients find some of these medication classes much easier to take than others.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The scientists compared patient adherence of the most common type 2 diabetes medication. While diabetes patients were most likely to avoid metformin, 23 per cent of sulfonylureas and 20 per cent of pioglitazone weren’t taken, the researchers claimed. A relatively newer type of drug, DPP4 inhibitors, had one of the highest level Continue reading >>

Could Drugs Delay The Diseases Of Ageing?

Could Drugs Delay The Diseases Of Ageing?

Could drugs delay the diseases of ageing? These are external links and will open in a new window Image caption Hilda Jaffe is still working at 95 Imagine having to ask a 95-year-old to slow down - well, I did. Hilda Jaffe was walking so fast there was a risk that the small group following her would be left behind. We had just met in the lobby of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, where Hilda is a volunteer tour guide, and she was escorting us to the vast, elaborately decorated Rose Main Reading Room. Hilda doesn't walk so much as stride. I know people 60 years her junior who are less nimble on their feet. In common with other super-agers, Hilda has retained her zest for life and knowledge. Hilda completes the New York Times crossword each day, belongs to two book clubs, goes to the opera, classical music concerts and the theatre. She also goes everywhere by foot, describing New York as a "great city for older people". Image caption Hilda on honeymoon with her late husband Gerry I asked Hilda what was the secret of her long and healthy life? She said: "Pick your parents; my father died at 88, my mother at 93, so it has to be genetic." Samples of Hilda's DNA are stored in a freezer at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. She is among more than 600 people aged over 90 who are part of the Longevity Genes Project. Image copyright Max Touhey Photography/NYPL Image caption The Rose Main Reading Room of the New York Public Library, which opened in 1911 and where Hilda Jaffe is a tour guide Dr Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging, said what was striking about the group was what unhealthy lives many had lived. He told me: "Almost 50% of them were overweight. Many were heavy smokers, did not exercise and had unhealthy diets Continue reading >>

For Metformin Add-on, No Winner In Head-to-head Cvd Trial

For Metformin Add-on, No Winner In Head-to-head Cvd Trial

For Metformin Add-On, No Winner in Head-to-Head CVD Trial Pioglitazone largely similar to sulfonylurea in pragmatic TOSCA.IT trial by Crystal Phend Crystal Phend, Senior Associate Editor, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: The incidence of a composite endpoint of cardiovascular events was similar with sulfonylureas and pioglitazone as add-on treatments to metformin in a long-term, pragmatic trial in Italy. Note that were there no significant differences in the endpoint components individually or in the key secondary endpoint of ischemic events (sudden death, fatal or non-fatal MI, fatal or non-fatal stroke, leg amputation above the ankle, and any revascularization of the coronary, leg, or carotid arteries). LISBON -- Pioglitazone (Actos) isn't better than a sulfonylurea as an add-on to metformin for reducing heart events in type 2 diabetes, the pragmatic randomized TOSCA.IT trial showed. Pioglitazone use came out similar to a sulfonylurea (mostly glimepiride [Amaryl] and gliclazide [not sold in the U.S.]) for the primary composite endpoint of all-cause mortality, nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke, and urgent coronary revascularization (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.74-1.26). Nor were there any significant differences in the components individually or in the key secondary endpoint of ischemic events (sudden death, fatal or non-fatal MI [including silent myocardial infarction], fatal or non-fatal stroke, leg amputation above the ankle, and any revascularization of the coronary, leg, or carotid arteries). The only significant efficacy difference between groups was for the key secondary endpoint in an on-treatment analysis effect (HR 0.67, P=0.03), "but it must be interpreted with caution," warned Antonio Nicolucci, MD, of the Center for Outcomes Resea Continue reading >>

Usf Study Urges Treat Prediabetes With Metformin

Usf Study Urges Treat Prediabetes With Metformin

USF study urges treat prediabetes with metformin Sep6,2017at10:23AM Sep6,2017at10:24AM TAMPA Researchers at the University of South Florida in Tampa are calling for more patients to be prescribed metformin, which controls blood sugar. The medication -- a pill available in both generic and name-brand form -- is used in less than 1 percent of the estimated 84 million Americans with prediabetes. Seventy percent of those with prediabetes eventually are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, a figure that prompted the USF study, which was published in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. Nick Carris, Ph.D. and assistant professor at the USF College of Pharmacy, said the study showed using metformin to treat patients with prediabetes would save approximately $20 per patient each year, resulting in $820 million saved annually in health care costs. While lifestyle intervention is the preferred method to prevent diabetes, many patients do not commit to or have the necessary resources to achieve a healthy balance of diet and exercise. Therefore, Carris estimates 41 million patients with prediabetes under 60 should be prescribed metformin, contributing to a potential 20 percent decline in Americans diagnosed with diabetes. Digital access or digital and print delivery. Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

A committed group of scientists is seeking to validate metformin as the first-ever anti-aging medication.1,2 In this day of staggering drug prices, metformin is available as a low-cost generic. One mechanism by which metformin works is by activating AMPK, an enzyme inside cells that lowers blood sugar by promoting energy utilization. Activating AMPK has broad-ranging effects that extend far beyond blood sugar control. Studies show that boosting AMPK activity can prevent—and even reverse—the life-shortening effects of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and more.3 In this article, we’ll review data that persuaded the FDA to allow metformin to be studied in humans as the first anti-aging drug.1 Broad-Spectrum Effects The most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug is metformin. It has been in use in England since 1958 and in the United States since 1995. Derived from a compound found in the French Lilac, metformin has a track record of safety and effectiveness at routine doses of up to 2,000 mg daily.4-7 So what evidence is there for the FDA to consider this drug as an anti-aging medication? The reason is simple: Metformin can block or diminish many of the fundamental factors that accelerate aging.8-12 These include protecting against DNA damage glycation, poor mitochondrial function, and chronic inflammation. Metformin has been shown to facilitate DNA repair, which is critical for cancer prevention. By attacking these fundamental degenerative processes, metformin can prevent the development of aging’s most troubling diseases. Metformin has also been shown to increase the production of known longevity-promoting signaling molecules in cells, such as mTOR and AMPK—all of which reduce fat and sugar storage and increas Continue reading >>

Metformin Found Safe In Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Metformin Found Safe In Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Metformin Found Safe in Pregnant Women With Diabetes Adverse outcomes tied to diabetes, not the drug by Jeff Minerd Jeff Minerd, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Note that this observational study suggests that women who take metformin during pregnancy have no increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, beyond those that arise through the presence of diabetes. Be aware that the authors did not analyze a group of women with diabetes but not treated with metformin. Pregnant women who took metformin for pregestational diabetes had a higher risk for adverse outcomes, but this risk was linked to the diabetes, not the drug, researchers reported. Pregnant women on metformin for other indications, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), had no significantly increased risk for poor outcomes, Alice Panchaud, PhD, of the University of Geneva in Switzerland, and colleagues wrote online in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology . Compared with a matched reference group of pregnant women not taking metformin, metformin users with diabetes were nearly four times more likely to give birth to an infant with major birth defects (odds ratio 3.95; 95% CI 1.77 to 9.41). However, there was no significantly increased risk for pregnant women on metformin for other reasons (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.18 to 2.81), the study found. Similarly, women taking metformin for pre-gestational diabetes had more than twice the risk for spontaneous abortion or stillbirth (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.44 to 4.36), but women taking metformin for other indications had no significant risk increase (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.74 to 2.59). The results were similar for other pregnancy outcomes the study examined, including the risk for pre-term birth and assisted delivery Continue reading >>

Metformin No Help For Atherosclerosis In T1d

Metformin No Help For Atherosclerosis In T1d

Metformin No Help for Atherosclerosis in T1D Findings don't support metformin in long-standing type 1 diabetes by Kristen Monaco, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Note that this randomized trial found that metformin use in type-1 diabetes was not associated with improved carotid intima-media thickness. A signal of potential renal benefit of metformin emerged, however, though this was a secondary outcome. SAN DIEGO -- Metformin didn't help diminish atherosclerosis in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to results of the REMOVAL trial. Compared with placebo, 1,000 mg twice-daily of oral metformin didn't reduce mean progression of common carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) over 3 years (-0.005 mm per year, 95% CI -0.012 to 0.002; P=0.1664), John Petrie, PhD, of the University of Glasgow in Scotland, and colleagues reported here at the American Diabetes Association and simultaneously in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology . They did find, however, that one of the trial's tertiary endpoints maximal cIMT -- was significantly reduced among the treatment group (-0.013 mm per year, -0.024 to -0.003; P=0.0093). Vivian Fonseca, MD, of Tulane University School of Medicine, who wasn't involved with the study, told MedPage Today that this tertiary endpoint represents a "small change, and we don't quite know what that means in terms of long-term cardiovascular outcomes." Some work has shown that metformin can reduce the need for insulin and improve glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes, but less is known about whether it confers cardiovascular protection. To explore that issue, Petrie and colleagues conducted the REMOVAL trial across 23 centers in five countries. The randomized, double-blind study Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin is #7 on the doctors’ hit parade of top 10 prescription drugs. Each year the number of prescriptions increases substantially. Last year there were 87 million metformin prescriptions dispensed in U.S. pharmacies. That does not count combo products that include metformin in their formulation such as Glucovance, Invokamet, Janumet, Kombiglyze XR, Metaglip and Synjardy, to name just a few. Metformin is clearly the #1 drug for diabetes and because the number of people with diabetes keeps going up, prescriptions for metformin are skyrocketing. That’s why readers of our syndicated newspaper column and visitors to this website are so desperate to learn more about metformin for diabetes. How To Know If Metformin for Diabetes Is Right for You: Here is a typical letter from a reader: Q. I crossed the line a month ago from normal blood sugar to type 2 diabetes and was put on metformin. I hate taking drugs. What can you tell me about metformin? Thank the Old Wives: A. Metformin is one of the oldest and most well-studied diabetes medicines. It probably comes as a shock to most prescribers to learn that their favorite diabetes drug is available thanks to the old wives. Practitioners of folk medicine discovered that French lilac (Galega officinalis) helped control the symptoms of a condition associated with “sweet urine.” An article in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (Oct. 15, 2001) noted: “In medieval times, a prescription of Galega officinalis was said to relieve the intense urination accompanying the disease that came to have the name of diabetes mellitus [now known as type 2 diabetes].” The botanist and physician Nicholas Culpeper detailed the health benefits of French lilac in 1656. He described the ability of the plant to lower blood sugar and control Continue reading >>

Metformin During Pregnancy May Up Childhood Obesity Risk

Metformin During Pregnancy May Up Childhood Obesity Risk

Metformin during pregnancy may up childhood obesity risk Last Updated at February 28, 2018 16:45 IST Manipulating gut bacteria may cut obesity, diabetes risk AstraZeneca Pharma launches anti-diabetic tablet Xigduo XR Protecting diabetics from vascular diseases Common BP drug may prevent onset of Type 1 diabetes Obesity may lower your chances of conception Kids born to pregnant women who consume metformin -- a medication used for the treatment of gestational diabetes or a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-- are at higher risk of developing obesity, researchers have claimed. The study found that metformin has the potential to cross the placenta and gets passed down to the foetus. Although metformin does not affect the birth weight of the child, but those getting exposed to the drug in their mother's womb note a comparatively higher body mass index (BMI) score than the others and were more likely to meet the criteria for obesity or overweight by the age of four years. "Our findings indicate the offspring of women who took metformin for PCOS during pregnancy are more likely to meet the criteria for obesity or overweight than children whose mothers were given a placebo during pregnancy," said lead author Liv Guro Engen Hanem, doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Norway. "The results were surprising, since limited past research in this area had suggested metformin would have a protective effect on the children's metabolic health," Hanem added. For the study, published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, the researchers included parents of 292 children. The results showed that by four years of age, the children whose mothers were randomized to metformin during pregnancy tended to weigh more than the child Continue reading >>

Study Reveals How Diabetes Drug Metformin Prevents, Suppresses Cancer Growth

Study Reveals How Diabetes Drug Metformin Prevents, Suppresses Cancer Growth

Study reveals how diabetes drug metformin prevents, suppresses cancer growth December 15, 2016, Massachusetts General Hospital Metformin 500mg tablets. Credit: public domain Considerable evidence has indicated that the drug metformin, used for more than 50 years to treat type 2 diabetes, also can prevent or slow the growth of certain cancers; but the mechanism behind its anticancer effects has been unknown. Now a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified a pathway that appears to underlie metformin's ability both to block the growth of human cancer cells and to extend the lifespan of the C.elegans roundworm, implying that this single genetic pathway plays an important role in a wide range of organisms. "We found that metformin reduces the traffic of molecules into and out of the nucleus - the 'information center' of the cell," says Alexander Soukas, MD, PhD, of the MGH Center for Human Genetic Research, senior author of the study in the Dec. 15 issue of Cell. "Reduced nuclear traffic translates into the ability of the drug to block cancer growth and, remarkably, is also responsible for metformin's ability to extend lifespan. By shedding new light on metformin's health-promoting effects, these results offer new potential ways that we can think about treating cancer and increasing healthy aging." Metformin's ability to lower blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes appears to result from the drug's effects on the liverreducing the organ's ability to produce glucose for release into the bloodstream. Evidence has supported the belief that this is the result of metformin's ability to block the activity of mitochondria, structures that serve as the powerhouse of the cell. But while that explanation appears to be fairly straightforward, S Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin is the first-line drug of choice in the treatment of type II diabetes. It was first approved in Europe in 1958.1 Americans had to wait until 1994 to legally obtain metformin.1 The holdup in approving metformin goes beyond the FDA. It is an indictment of a political/legal system that will forever cause needless suffering and death unless substantively changed. When Life Extension® informed Americans about drugs like metformin in the 1980s, the FDA did everything in its power to incarcerate me and shut down our Foundation.2 FDA propaganda at the time was that consumers needed to be "protected" against "unproven" therapies. As history has since proven, the result of the FDA's embargo has been unparalleled human carnage. So called "consumer protection" translated into ailing Americans being denied access to therapies that the FDA now claims are essential to saving lives. Today's major problem is not drugs available in other countries that Americans can't access. Instead, it is a political/legal system that suffocates medical innovation. Headline news stories earlier this year touted the anti-cancer effects of metformin, data that Foundation members were alerted to long ago.3 The problem is that it is illegal for metformin manufacturers to promote this drug to cancer patients or oncologists. It's also illegal to promote metformin to healthy people who want to reduce their risk of cancer, diabetes, vascular occlusion, and obesity. This fatal departure from reality continues unabated, as our dysfunctional political/legal system denies information about metformin that could spare countless numbers of lives. Type II diabetics suffer sharply higher rates of cancer4-7and vascular disease.8-11 The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been shown in numerous scientific studies Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Medication That Costs 6 Cents A Pill Could Be A Key To Living Longer

A Diabetes Medication That Costs 6 Cents A Pill Could Be A Key To Living Longer

American Federation for Aging Research Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD, discusses the promise of the FDA-approved drug Metformin to delay multiple age-related conditions at a 2016 event. AP A generic drug that's used to treat type 2 diabetes could help people live longer, healthier lives. Metformin, a drug that's been approved in the US for decades, is typically taken as a pill every day by people with diabetes. But now researchers are looking into whether the drug could hold the key to living longer — and early research seems promising. Dr. Nir Barzilai, the director of Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, has been researching the drug, with the hopes of one day getting it approved as an anti-aging treatment by the FDA. If future research yields good results, metformin could become a much cheaper option than other approaches biotech companies are taking to help us live healthier, longer lives. A potential anti-aging drug that's been around for ages Metformin has been around in one form or another for centuries — Wired reports that it's actually a modified version of a compound found in the flower Galega officinalis, which you may know as French lilac. It was approved by the FDA for diabetes treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994 (not type 1, which is the result of an autoimmune disorder) though it was available in other countries before then. Today, metformin one of the most popular prescriptions in the US, according to GoodRx. The drug can cost as little as $4, or 6 cents a pill. Since metformin was approved for diabetes, it has started to be used off-label to treat conditions like pre-diabetes, gestational diabetes, and polycystic ovarian disease. Some retrospective studies and preclinical work have indica Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes VIENNA, Austria — Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) or Alzheimer's dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not — even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan told Medscape Medical News that "some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative ." So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. "We'd heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse," she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but there's been "some question" about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had metformin pre Continue reading >>

Pinnacle Medical Group Nashville, Tn | Internal Medicine, Screenings, Cosmetic

Pinnacle Medical Group Nashville, Tn | Internal Medicine, Screenings, Cosmetic

Botox and Dysport, dermal fillers, Juvaderm and Restylane. Cosmetic injections are FDA approved, very safe, and extremely effective. Practicing in Nashville since 2002, Dr. Lohrey received her Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and Medical Degree from University of CA at Irvine, also completing residency there. American Board of Internal Medicine Certified. American Chemistry Society. TN Women in Medicine. HCA Panel for Womans Health Services. Pinnacle Medical is a dedicated practice that is always working to better your health and keep current with the latest standards of care. Book online or by phone at (615) 320-8877. At Pinnacle Medical Group our focus each and every day is on your health and well being. We want our patients to feel comfortable about their healthcare. To not only feel great while maintaining optimum health, but to look as good as they feel and have a team of professionals standing with them in achieving their individual goals in life. Our page is meant to inspire and celebrates how our friends inspire us. Your tips and suggestions help us to constantly improve. Let us know how we can help you even more. Continue reading >>

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