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Metformin Muscle Pain

Metformin And Statin-induced Myopathies: Potential Adherence Booster?

Metformin And Statin-induced Myopathies: Potential Adherence Booster?

Metformin and Statin-Induced Myopathies: Potential Adherence Booster? Despite ample evidence supporting statin use to lower cholesterol, and reduce risks for coronary heart disease, some patients hesitate to take them or experience muscular adverse effects. The latterstatin-induced myopathiesare a main cause of nonadherence, which leads to insufficient cardiovascular risk reduction. Patients who are nonadherent don't receive cardiovascular risk reductions to the same degree that those who take their statins as prescribed do. So far, researchers have been unable to identify a treatment for statin-related muscle pain. A team from the University of South Florida in Tampa has published a study in the journal Diabetes, Obestity and Metabolism, assessing a novel intervention. They examined the possibility that metformin might reduce muscle pain. They also reanalyzed data from the ACCORD trial, a study that assessed patients for muscle cramps, and leg/calve pain while walking, which are typical nonsevere statin muscle pain symptoms. These researchers enrolled patients taking a statin (n = 445), or a statin and metformin (n = 869). They found significant differences: in the group of participants treated with statins and metformin, fewer individuals reported muscle cramps (35%), and walking leg/clave pain (40%). The rates of muscle cramps, and walking leg/calve pain were 42% and 47%, respectively, in the statin-only group. Comprehensive analysis indicated that metformin was associated with a 23% odds reduction for muscle cramps, and 29% odds reduction for leg/clave pain while walking. The authors concluded that metformin may reduce risk of nonsevere statin muscle pain. According to the report, they believe that metformin's effect on mitochondrial oxidative stress and AMPK may b Continue reading >>

Metformin And Muscle Weakness, Pain

Metformin And Muscle Weakness, Pain

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was on Metformin once before and got off it for almost a year until my endo wanted me back on [500mg ER tid]. I'm back on it now for about 4 months or so now and have come to notice that my muscles are turning flabby and I'm weak. I have trouble standing in one position [shower] without swaying to the walls. And my legs hurt; my shoulders feel so heavy. Anyone care to share their muscle-related experiences while on Met? What did you do? If you got off Met did your muscle strength return? I can't say that I've noticed this, but, anything is possible CALynn. You may want to check with you doctors, and also check on line for possible side effects with Metformin. In fact, I checked for you, and found on page 2, of this info (at top of page) that muscle pain is possible. Check out this site: Metformin Side Effects I have noticed muscle weakness and leg tenderness when I'm on Cipro, which is used to treat my constant sinus infections. Hello Cal, I'm just wondering, are you taking any other meds that could be causing this maybe? This is kinda freaking me out...have been on the fence with beginning Metformin for the first time & this is the first I've ever read about this happening. Hope you're feeling better soon whatever it is!! I've been on metformin for nearly 4 years w/o any type muscle problems. We have many on metformin here on the forums, hopefully they will chime in as well. Hope you get to the bottom of what's causing your muscle weakness soon. I was on Metformin once before and got off it for almost a year until my endo wanted me back on [500mg ER tid]. I'm back on it now for about 4 mon Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked To Reduced Risk Of Statin-associated Muscle Pain

Metformin Use Linked To Reduced Risk Of Statin-associated Muscle Pain

Metformin Use Linked to Reduced Risk of Statin-Associated Muscle Pain Metformin Use Linked to Reduced Risk of Statin-Associated Muscle Pain Metformin may help reduce the risk of non-severe statin muscle pain, according to a secondary data analysis of the ACCORD trial. Statin-associated muscle pain can hinder medication adherence which could potentially lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Currently, there are no approved treatments for statin-associated muscle pain. Should Statins Be Available Over-the-Counter? An Expert Interview with Robert Eckel, MD For this study, researchers sought to determine the impact of metformin on statin-associated muscle symptoms by analyzing data from the ACCORD trial. They evaluated patients for muscle cramps and leg/calve pain while walking, a common non-severe statin-associated muscle pain symptom, and compared muscle pain among patients taking a statin (n=445) or a statin + metformin (n=869) at baseline. Compared to statin-only users, the unadjusted data indicated fewer reports of muscle cramps (35% vs 42%) and walking leg/calve pain (40% vs 47%) among statin + metformin users. The researchers calculated a 23% reduced risk of muscle cramps (P=0.046) and a 29% reduced risk of leg/calve pain while walking (P=0.01) based on multivariable regression analysis. "Metformin appears to reduce the risk of non-severe statin muscle pain," the researchers concluded. "Additional research is needed to confirm the finding and assess metformin's impact on statin adherence and related cardiovascular outcomes." Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a class of widely prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes is tied to severe joint pain in some patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Friday. The drugs -- sitagliptin (Januvia), saxagliptin (Onglyza), linagliptin (Tradjenta) and alogliptin (Nesina) -- come from a newer class of medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. The drugs can be taken alone or used in conjunction with other diabetes drugs, such as metformin. DPP-4 inhibitors help fight type 2 diabetes by boosting the amount of insulin the body produces after each meal, when blood sugar levels are typically high. However, in a statement, the FDA said the medications "may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling," and the agency "has added a new Warning and Precaution about this risk to the labels of all medicines in this drug class." The FDA stressed that patients who take a DPP-4 inhibitor should not stop using the drug, "but should contact their health care professional right away if they experience severe and persistent joint pain." Doctors and other health-care workers should "consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe joint pain and discontinue the drug if appropriate," the agency said. Type 2 diabetes, which is often but not always linked to obesity, affects about 95 percent of people with diabetes. As the FDA noted, "when untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease." Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin Stomach And Muscle Pain

Metformin Stomach And Muscle Pain

I was really hoping the I could take Janumet because it contained Metformin and not generic Met. My endo wanted me to try it for two days. [Smart fella, that guy! Why two? Not three? Wouldn't I know in one day?] Monday: I took first pill at noon. No stomach pain. Tuesday: A.M. My muscles were sore. I had random stomach pains, but nothing to be concerned about. P.M. As I turned on my side I had this crazy pain that had become so familiar while on Met 500 X2 for five weeks: It felt like a fist was pushing under my ribs in the stomach area. that pain had been absent after I switched from Met to Januvia. This morning I woke with pain in the whole stomach area through to my back; my chest aches, my back aches and I have pain down my arms. For a few moments I questioned myself: was I imagining this? No way! I know Janumet is a good med and I wanted to continue taking it. I am not imagining anything. My body is reacting to this in wierd ways. I have been told by some of this is not a normal response to Metformin. I believe that, but my body does what it does and these are the same symptoms I had when on Metformin; they went away after I quit Metformin and went on Januvia; they are back since taking Janumet. I am so glad I have other options. To those who can take Met: I applaud you. I believe it is the best thing out there, at least for a baseline med. You definitely sound like you have a reaction to something in the Metformin. I had a little GI upset but it was mostly bloating and gas but it slowly disappeared. You may also find you get stomach upset withnByiredon, Victoza or Byetta. It may be that you are a candidate for insulin, it is usually symptom free. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glim Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

A popular oral drug for treating Type 2 diabetes. Metformin (brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet) is a member of a class of drugs called biguanides that helps lower blood glucose levels by improving the way the body handles insulin — namely, by preventing the liver from making excess glucose and by making muscle and fat cells more sensitive to available insulin. Metformin not only lowers blood glucose levels, which in the long term reduces the risk of diabetic complications, but it also lowers blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels and does not cause weight gain the way insulin and some other oral blood-glucose-lowering drugs do. Overweight, high cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels all increase the risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in people with Type 2 diabetes. Another advantage of metformin is that it does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when it is the only diabetes medicine taken. Metformin is typically taken two to three times a day, with meals. The extended-release formula (Glucophage XR) is taken once a day, with the evening meal. The most common side effects of metformin are nausea and diarrhea, which usually go away over time. A more serious side effect is a rare but potentially fatal condition called lactic acidosis, in which dangerously high levels of lactic acid build up in the bloodstream. Lactic acidosis is most likely to occur in people with kidney disease, liver disease, or congestive heart failure, or in those who drink alcohol regularly. (If you have more than four alcoholic drinks a week, metformin may not be the best medicine for you.) Unfortunately, many doctors ignore these contraindications (conditions that make a particular treatment inadvisable) and prescribe metformin to people Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin, Muscle Pain, And Orange P

Metformin, Muscle Pain, And Orange P

Author Dr. Alice Categories Metformin , My Patients , Patient Questions Tags Dr. Alice , metformin , Opinion Five weeks ago when Dr. Alice Talks got a Facebook presence, I started a whole new episode of learning about drug side effects. Until then I was used to reading about a few reports here and there and then wait decades to have enough cases to draw a conclusion. Facebook is different: I encounter dozensof reports every day as I get online. If I ask for clarification the reply comes right away with plenty of details and often pictures too! Each drug side effect means something important. It has a story, a reason, and a consequence. Ittells us specific information about one individual. Changing the drug does not change the cause for which a patient responded in a given way to a drug treatment (i.e. experienced a side effect). It is like looking in the mirror and pretending it never happened! Sometimes that very same cause may trigger future events of dramatic importance in ones life. I mean this in both the very good and the very bad way. Understandingthat reasoncould get usso muchcloser to theHoly Grail of how our body works Being the pharmacist that I am, when 10 people taking metformin share detailed information about one given side effect in one single day I cant just keep doing what I was doing. Naturally, I stop and switch gears to figure what in the world that meant. As we speak, more than a few individuals experience muscle pain and weakness after taking metformin. Others notice a urine color change to dark orange. What does this mean? Metformin is a simple salt before it gets in the body but shifts into a water-loving positively charged particle once the tablet dissolves. This makes it completely insoluble in fat which makes the ability of this particle to Continue reading >>

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin?

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin?

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin? Thank you. I've tried time release, regular & the liquid, Riomet. I seem to have trouble no matter the version. HEALTH_NOW There is another post on here, she said she was giving time release and that almost completely took care of her problems. Yes I've had some of those symptoms & others. Problem with taking many medications is figuring out the ones causing the problem & wondering if it is the combination rather than just one med. Very frustrating especially since no doctor helping so I'm trying to do it on my own. This has been an interesting week. I had my diabetes class tuesday and it was really good. I ended up asking about all of these symptoms I have been having for 3 years and the doctor said all these symptoms aren't from diabetes..He told me to stop Metformin for 2 weeks and see how I feel? The next day a lot of the symptoms went away! Wow! I have been going through this for 3 years. Since I have been eating good and have lost 7 lbs now, my A1C went from 7.5 to 7. I went to the doctor today and that was an interesting experience, different doctor than the doctor at my diabetes class. It turns out I have asthma. My echocardiogram was good. Here are some of the symptoms I was having numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak diarrhea, or a metallic taste in the mouth may occur. actic acidosis. Symptoms include: tiredness. unusual muscle pain. trouble breathing. unusual sleepiness. dizziness or lightheadedness. ... low blood sugar. Symptoms include: headache. weakness. confusion. shaking or feeling jittery. drowsiness. dizziness. I know this is an old post, but I've been suffering all year with feeling hot even in winter & with ac in summer, burning back sensation, b Continue reading >>

Metformin And Muscle Pain

Metformin And Muscle Pain

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I am type 2, diagnosed before Xmas. On metformin 2 x 500g a day. The tops of my legs, hips and bum area go from slight numbness to painful especially when I lie down at night. Its like pressure points. Has anyone else experienced this. Not sure if I should persevere or ditch the pills. Any replies appreciated Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member It sounds more like statin side effects. Are you on a statin by any chance? No, no statins. Doctor wasnt sure if I needed metformin or not as my levels not too high fbg 8.5 hbA1c 52 so might just stop taking them and see if symptoms ease. Thanks for reply Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member No, no statins. Doctor wasnt sure if I needed metformin or not as my levels not too high fbg 8.5 hbA1c 52 so might just stop taking them and see if symptoms ease. Thanks for reply Many on here have reduced their HbA1c on diet alone, have you changed your diet? My HbA1c was higher at 70 on diagnosis and I do take Metformin, but I believe that the low carb diet I eat has reduced it more than the tablets. Hi, I am type 2, diagnosed before Xmas. On metformin 2 x 500g a day. The tops of my legs, hips and bum area go from slight numbness to painful especially when I lie down at night. Its like pressure points. Has anyone else experienced this. Not sure if I should persevere or ditch the pills. Any replies appreciated Was initially started just on Gliclazide when diagnosed T2 March last year. During an appointment with an Endocrinology consultant I had Metformin added to my medication. I experienced aches and pains in all my leg muscles after a few weeks on Gliclazide and Metformin. Had the Metformin sto Continue reading >>

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia 1Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Correspondence: Hussein Yassine, Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2250 Alcazar St, Los Angeles, CA 90030, USA, Phone +1 323 442 1909, Fax +1 323 442 2082, Email [email protected] Theodore Price, Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, 1501N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245050, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA, Tel +1 520 471 0360, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Taylor et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License The full terms of the License are available at . Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. This article has been corrected. See J Pain Res. 2014; 7: 89 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenos Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

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