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Metformin Joint Pain

Metformin For Pain? Study Says: Not Yet

Metformin For Pain? Study Says: Not Yet

Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drugs in the world. Its safety, effectiveness, and relatively low side effect profile have made it an international superstar and the gold standard for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although almost exclusively prescribed for treatment of diabetes, metformin has recently been the subject of clinical trials for treatment of breast cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and premature puberty. All of those conditions are related to the levels of insulin produced by the body. But could metformins star still be on the rise? If the drug can be clinically proven to treat pain, the answer would be a definitive yes. There is strong connection between diabetes and pain; patients with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, and the disease causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness, and swelling in fingers, shoulders, and feet. One pharmacological target for the treatment of chronic pain conditions is the kinase adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK). Metformin acts via AMPK, pointing to a possible clinical rationale for its use in pain patients. As yet, there is little clinical evidence that metformin can effectively treat pain, although a 2013 study in the Journal of Pain Research was among the first to find a correlation between metformin and pain relief. That study, which looked at lumbar spine pain, concluded that, Patients on metformin showed a non-statistically significant trend toward decreased pain on a variety of pain descriptors. Our proof-of-concept findings suggest that metformin use is associated with a decrease in lumbar radiculopathy pain, providing a rationale for larger retrospective trials in different pai Continue reading >>

Metaglip Side Effects Center

Metaglip Side Effects Center

Metaglip (glipizide and metformin HCl) is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. Metaglip is not for treating type 1 diabetes. The brand name Metaglip is discontinued, but generic versions may be available. Common side effects of Metaglip (glipizide and metformin HCl) include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain or upset, joint or muscle aches pain, headache, dizziness, or cold symptoms (stuffy nose, sneezing, or sore throat). Dosage of Metaglip is individualized on the basis of both effectiveness and tolerance while not exceeding the maximum recommended daily dose of 20 mg glipizide/2000 mg metformin. Metaglip may interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine, ranitidine, amiloride, triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, vancomycin, or ketoconazole, or itraconazole. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Metaglip with isoniazid, diuretics, steroids, heart or blood pressure medications, niacin, phenothiazines, thyroid medicines, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Metaglip with exenatide, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or other diabetes medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Metaglip should be used only when prescribed. Insulin treatment may be preferred during pregnancy. If you are using this drug during your pregnancy, your doctor may switch you to insulin at least 1 month before the expected delivery date because of Metaglip Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Diabetes Medications Cause “severe” Joint Pain!

Fda Warns Diabetes Medications Cause “severe” Joint Pain!

If you manage your type 2 diabetes with a medicine classified as a DPP-4 inhibitor, the FDA has issued a warning that the medication may cause severe joint pain. The warning applies to the following medications, which are available under different brand names alone or combined with other diabetes medicines like metformin: sitagliptin saxagliptin linagliptin alogliptin The joint pain may develop anywhere from one day to many years after starting the medication. Once the medication is discontinued, symptoms are expected to resolve. What to do if you note joint pain associated with your medication: Consult your healthcare provider immediately. Do not discontinue your medication until you’ve consulted your healthcare provider. If possible, also report the adverse reaction to the FDA MedWatch program. Once you consult with your healthcare provider ask for non-pharmacological alternatives. Further information on the precaution DPP-4 inhibitors (short for Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors) control high blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes by helping the body increase the level of the hormone insulin after meals. The warning applies to the following prescription medications, which are used to control type 2 diabetes: Brand Name Active Ingredients Januvia sitagliptin Janumet sitagliptin and metformin Janumet XR sitagliptin and metformin extended release Onglyza saxagliptin Kombiglyze XR saxagliptin and metformin extended release Tradjenta linagliptin Glyxambi linagliptin and empagliflozin Jentadueto linagliptin and metformin Nesina alogliptin Kazano alogliptin and metformin Oseni alogliptin and pioglitazone This warning was issued by the FDA after finding 33 cases of severe arthralgia (joint pain) in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. The most frequ Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia 1Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Correspondence: Hussein Yassine, Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2250 Alcazar St, Los Angeles, CA 90030, USA, Phone +1 323 442 1909, Fax +1 323 442 2082, Email [email protected] Theodore Price, Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, 1501N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245050, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA, Tel +1 520 471 0360, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Taylor et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License The full terms of the License are available at . Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. This article has been corrected. See J Pain Res. 2014; 7: 89 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenos Continue reading >>

Muscle Pain And Metformin

Muscle Pain And Metformin

Thanks for your reply, Jangar. My husband did mention this to the GP at his annual review a couple of months ago. At that time he was also taking an additional medication (the name of which totally escapes me at the moment, sorry) and we thought it was that which was causing the problem as one of the side effects was muscle pains. So he stopped taking that (with the GP's permission) but the pain didn't go away. I would have thought there would be other symptoms as well if it was lactic acidosis? Unfortunately the diabetic team and GP at our surgery are not exactly brilliant. My husband has to tell THEM about diabetes! I will make sure he makes a point of mentioning this to the doctor and getting some kind of answer, but I know he won't go until his next appointment and there's no way I can make him. However, I will see if he'll ring the GP and speak to him, as they are quite happy to speak to you on the phone. Thanks again, and if and when I get any answers I'll let you know. Best wishes.<1268> Lancer, I see this is an old thread, but you posted today. Are you sure you're not on some statin tablet too, for cholesterol? Because certain statin tablets definitely cause muscle pains. It does not affect all people, but I have heard big complaints about muscle pain by people taking tablets like Simvastatin ... Sorry, I am not clued up on the names of these tablets. Most end in -statin, but not all of them. I've never had muscle pains that I can recall, taking Glucophage (which is Metformin by another name). Hi Avocet I was thinking Cholesterol medications might be doing this! I had terrible muscle pain with Crestor and was switched to Lipitor, The reason I am up at 300 am is the terrible muscle pain. Just doing a little browsing myself and apparently and found this can also c Continue reading >>

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a class of widely prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes is tied to severe joint pain in some patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Friday. The drugs -- sitagliptin (Januvia), saxagliptin (Onglyza), linagliptin (Tradjenta) and alogliptin (Nesina) -- come from a newer class of medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. The drugs can be taken alone or used in conjunction with other diabetes drugs, such as metformin. DPP-4 inhibitors help fight type 2 diabetes by boosting the amount of insulin the body produces after each meal, when blood sugar levels are typically high. However, in a statement, the FDA said the medications "may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling," and the agency "has added a new Warning and Precaution about this risk to the labels of all medicines in this drug class." The FDA stressed that patients who take a DPP-4 inhibitor should not stop using the drug, "but should contact their health care professional right away if they experience severe and persistent joint pain." Doctors and other health-care workers should "consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe joint pain and discontinue the drug if appropriate," the agency said. Type 2 diabetes, which is often but not always linked to obesity, affects about 95 percent of people with diabetes. As the FDA noted, "when untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease." Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About: Metformin

What You Should Know About: Metformin

If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or you're prediabetic, there's a good chance you've been placed on at least one medication to control your blood glucose levels. Glucose is a sugar that provides energy to the body's cells. Physicians have several diabetes medications at their disposal (see chart). Some drugs help stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the blood and into cells, where it's needed for energy. These include meglitinides and sulfonylureas, some of the oldest diabetes drugs. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin Joint Pain - Medhelp

Metformin Joint Pain - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin joint pain Within the last 3 weeks he has started having joint pain and now his ankles and feet are swelling. We have been to the doctor and they have run several blood test and have found no problems but yet he continues to be in pain. He can hardly walk on his feet. They did give him something for inflammation but it is not working. Does anyone have any ideas or has anyone experienced the same symptoms? We are desperate to find out what is going on. Recently he started having a lot of joint pain . Now his ankles and feet are swelling. His sugar levels are doing great. We have been to the doctor and he has had several test done. Everything is coming back good. Has anyone had these same symptoms? He is taking Metformin and I am wondering if this has anything to do with this. IS IT NORMAL TO HAVE JOINT PAIN AS A SYMPTOM OF PCOS??? I CANT TAKE THE PAIN ANYMORE AND MY DR SAID I HAVE TO LOSE WEIGHT TO CALM DOWN THE SYMPTOMS BUT ITS HARDER THAN I THOUGHT TO EXERCISE WHEN EVERY JOINT IN MY BODY HURTS. For many years now (at least 15) I have had various degrees of joint pain . The pain is often made worse by repetitive movements, i.e. I used to play piano but it started to hurt my fingers and wrist, and I play sports and go regularly to the gym so I constantly have ankle, knee and hip pain. I have always had positive ANA but just recently had a RF come back positive at 44. The doctor wants to 'monitor' this but Im worried as it had been going on for so long. hi any advice much appreciated, i have been previously using Janmut for my diabetics but have run out so i was told Velmetia was the same, while i sent away to CDO for this Velmetia i used Matformin and boy oh boy i got terrible side effects from joint pain to stomach pain to h Continue reading >>

Metformin And Joint Pain - From Fda Reports

Metformin And Joint Pain - From Fda Reports

Joint pain is found among people who take Metformin, especially for people who are female, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for 1 - 6 months, also take medication Humira, and have Rheumatoid arthritis. This review analyzes which people have Joint pain with Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 199,020 people who have side effects when taking Metformin from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Metformin and have Joint pain, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Metformin and have Joint pain Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 21.74 % 1 - 6 months: 26.09 % 6 - 12 months: 10.14 % 1 - 2 years: 5.8 % 2 - 5 years: 17.39 % 5 - 10 years: 17.39 % 10+ years: 1.45 % Gender of people who have Joint pain when taking Metformin *: female: 63.41 % male: 36.59 % Age of people who have Joint pain when taking Metformin *: 0-1: 0.09 % 2-9: 0.03 % 10-19: 0.52 % 20-29: 0.83 % 30-39: 4.13 % 40-49: 11.71 % 50-59: 29.0 % 60+: 53.68 % Top conditions involved for these people *: Rheumatoid Arthritis (668 people, 16.00%) High Blood Pressure (633 people, 15.16%) High Blood Cholesterol (592 people, 14.18%) Pain (314 people, 7.52%) Depression (257 people, 6.15%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Humira (593 people, 14.20%) Aspirin (484 people, 11.59%) Lisinopril (396 people, 9.48%) Lipitor (394 people, 9.43%) Lantus (361 people, 8.64%) Top other side effects for these people *: Pain In Extremity (866 people, 20.74%) Pain (778 people, 18.63%) Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Fda Issues Warning For Joint Pain From Diabetes Drugs

Fda Issues Warning For Joint Pain From Diabetes Drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a new warning and precaution about the risks of severe and disabling joint pain related to the class of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors used to treat diabetes.1 Drugs in this class include alogliptin (Nesina), linagliptin (Tradjenta), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia). All single-agent DPP-4 inhibitors and their combinations are subject to the warning. Combinations include sitagliptin/metformin and ER (Janumet/XR), saxagliptin/metformin ER (Kombiglyze XR), linagliptin/empagliflozin (Glyxambi), linaglitptin/metformin (Jentadueto), alogliptin/metformin (Kazano) and alogliptin/pioglitazone (Oseni). The onset of joint pain in patients taking these therapies can occur at any time during treatment, from one day to years after starting the drug therapy. Patients experienced symptom relief after discontinuing the medication. When re-challenged with a DPP-4 inhibitor, some patients had a recurrence of severe joint pain. Healthcare professionals should consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe and persistent joint pain in patients receiving these treatments if other causes are ruled out. Healthcare professionals are encouraged to report any suspected adverse drug reactions to the FDA’s MedWatch Program. Directions for the program’s Online Voluntary Reporting Form are available online, as well as more detailed information about the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).2–4 Additionally, the FDA has strengthened the warnings and precautions sections of the drug labels for the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet).5 This warning is related to an increased risk of bone fractures. The FDA added new information about decreases in bone mi Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

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