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Metformin Induced Gastritis

Long Term Treatment With Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Risk Of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency: Randomised Placebo Controlled Trial

Long Term Treatment With Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Risk Of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency: Randomised Placebo Controlled Trial

Long term treatment with metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes and risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency: randomised placebo controlled trial Long term treatment with metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes and risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency: randomised placebo controlled trial BMJ 2010; 340 doi: (Published 20 May 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c2181 Rapid responses are electronic letters to the editor. They enable our users to debate issues raised in articles published on thebmj.com. Although a selection of rapid responses will be included online and in print as readers' letters, their first appearance online means that they are published articles. If you need the url (web address) of an individual response, perhaps for citation purposes, simply click on the response headline and copy the url from the browser window. Letters are indexed in PubMed. As the authors clearly stated, a major limitation of the study is the lack of measurement of serum methylmalonic acid(MMA) levels. Clinical symptoms can occur even at borderline low levels of B12 from 100-200 ng/L. At these borderline levels a raised serum methylmalonic acid level can identify early clinical deficiency states that require treatment. It would have been interesting to know how many of the borderline cases of B12 deficiency had raised MMA levels that may have required Competing interests: No competing interests Georgi Abraham, Varun Sundaram, Yuvaram N.V. Reddy We appreciate these comments. In response to Novoselsky: the clinical consequences of metformin-associated vitamin B-12 deficiency have not been extensively studied. Novoselskys data suggest, importantly, that anaemia may be one such consequence. In addition, Novoselskys data certainly do not exclude other consequences. In fact, a recent studied sug Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Experienced Bouts Of Gastritis After Long Term Use Of Metformin, 850 2x Daily?

Has Anyone Experienced Bouts Of Gastritis After Long Term Use Of Metformin, 850 2x Daily?

Home Q & A Questions Has anyone experienced bouts... Has anyone experienced bouts of gastritis after long term use of Metformin, 850 2x daily? I've been taking Metforming for approximately 2.5 years and have recently endured a bad bout of gastitis. I have a small ulcer. After dietary changes, 4 months have passed and I'm suffering from symptoms. I adjusted well to Metformin at first. I don't drink, smoke and don't rely on NSAIDS for pain relief. If you have been on Metformin this long and the effects are just now occuring then I doubt it is related to the metformin at all. I think it is due to some other cause. If it were the metformin, it would have started long ago. Many cases of gastritis, especially in warmer months, are actually more likely to be from food borne pathogens. Food borne pathogens can make you very very ill. Foods that make you sick may not look bad, smell bad or taste bad but may be laden with enough bacterias that will make you sick. It could be something in your fridge that is infecting you over and over when you use it. common things to look at are condiments that may have been hanging out in the firdge like jars of mayonaise, mustard, ketchup, jams, jellies, peanut butter, margarines etc. It is good to write the date a product was opened on the label and dischard it a few months later. Buying large jars of products like mayonaise may not be saving you money if you do not use them quickly enough and they become laden with bacterias. Buy no more product than what you can use in 3 months. Just something to think about and keep in mind! Another surprising way to pick up pathogens that cause gastritis is pools and spas. Fecal matter can sometimes contaminate a pool or spa from children wearing diapers in public pools and also from adults who have poor Continue reading >>

Anyone Struggling With Gastritis?

Anyone Struggling With Gastritis?

I don't eat anything these days I haven't eaten before, and I've never had any intolerance or had any GI issues at all in my life. In the not too distant past you said you've had a history of digestive issues all your life. My digestion has never been that great and all my life I've generally eaten just one big meal a day and then a day later it's digested and I'm ready to eat again. I'm not sure what proof you're looking for here Nicole, I am totally convinced, that's enough for me Martin, this is gastritis, which I've never had, not slow digestion, which I've had but it never caused me problems really and in fact was a benefit if anything, I could go a long time without eating and feel great. These are entirely different conditions. When I said GI issues I meant illnesses and I never got sick from that at all. Sorry for the confusion D.D. Family T2 since 2005, Control via LCHF/Exercise, No Meds I never had any digestion or stomach problems since I was a child. I started on Metformin (Glucovance) when I was first diagnosed and noticed some very minor problems (a bit of nausea once in a while after taking my meds), but nothing serious to affect my eating. I still had a voracious appetite. A few months ago I went on insulin and changed to Janumet, which is Metformin + Januvia. Not sure why, but the stomach problems hit with a vengeance almost immediately. Everything I read indicates that it's likely the Metfomin, but I don't understand why it wasn't a major issue with my previous medication. My doc says the insulin shouldn't have made any difference. The dosage stayed the same. Anyways, my solution was simply to cut back on my food intake. I quickly found that eating more than about 600 ~ 700 calories at any one meal initiated some pain in my stomach and if I kept on, I Continue reading >>

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Asymptomatic Chronic Gastritis Decreases Metformin Tolerance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Asymptomatic Chronic Gastritis Decreases Metformin Tolerance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

J Clin Pharm Ther. 2015 Aug;40(4):461-5. doi: 10.1111/jcpt.12290. Epub 2015 May 29. Asymptomatic chronic gastritis decreases metformin tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Digestive disorders represent the most common metformin side effects for type 2 diabetes. The mechanism of these metformin side effects is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess whether asymptomatic chronic gastritis could influence metformin tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Demographic, anthropometric, ultrasound and laboratory data were obtained from 144 metformin nave patients with diabetes. The diagnosis of chronic gastritis was based on endoscopic and histopathological examination, and H. pylori infection was assessed based on (13) C urea breath test (UBT). All subjects started metformin at 500 mg/day and increasing progressively to 1500 mg/day over 4 weeks. A score of gastrointestinal side effects (abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, bloating and anorexia) was assessed each week, and metformin dose was adjusted as appropriate. Based on endoscopy, 64 patients were categorized as non-gastritis subjects and 80 as chronic gastritis subjects. At baseline, there is no statistical difference in gastrointestinal symptoms between two groups. With metformin, the mean scores for gastrointestinal symptoms in the non-gastritis and gastritis subjects were 102 171 vs. 218 205 (P = 0001), 020 065 vs. 050 089 (P = 0022), 0 vs. 006 024 (P = 0024) and 108 103 vs. 171 166 (P = 0028). The mean final metformin dose used by gastritis subjects was 70624 56890 mg, significantly less than the mean dose used by non-gastritis subjects (110156 57858 mg, P = 0001). After adjustment for age Continue reading >>

What Are The Long-term Effects Of Metformin?

What Are The Long-term Effects Of Metformin?

Metformin is a prescription drug that is used to help control blood glucose levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is commonly sold under the brand names Glucophage and Fortamet and is available in regular and slow-release tablets. Metformin works by acting on the liver and intestines to decrease secretion and absorption of glucose into the blood. It also increases the insulin sensitivity of muscles and tissues of the body so that they take up glucose more readily. MayoClinic.com underlines that as with any medication, metformin can cause unwanted side effects that may be common or more serious. Video of the Day Patients taking metformin, particularly women may experience general malaise, fatigue, and occasional achiness. Malaise may be caused by other effects of metformin on the liver, kidneys, stomach and intestines, as noted by Drugs.com. Vitamin B12 Malabsorption Vitamin B12 malabsorption may also occur in some patients on metformin treatment. MayoClinic.com explains that a chemical in the stomach called intrinsic factor is required for the body to absorb vitamin B12. Metformin can interfere with this chemical, causing decreased absorption of the vitamin. Over the long term, a vitamin B12 deficiency can cause significant health risks as this essential vitamin is important for synthesis of DNA, red blood cell production and other biochemical functions in the body. Decreased vitamin B12 in the blood can lead to megoblastic anemia in which the bone marrow cannot adequately manufacture red blood cells. Though this type of anemia is not common, it can occur from long-term use of metformin, causing decreased vitamin B12 levels. Long-term metformin use can cause liver or kidney problems in some individuals, according to MayoClinic.com, because the medicati Continue reading >>

Asymptomatic Gastritis Associated With Metformin Side Effects In Type 2 Patients

Asymptomatic Gastritis Associated With Metformin Side Effects In Type 2 Patients

Asymptomatic gastritis associated with metformin side effects in type 2 patients Asymptomatic gastritis associated with metformin side effects in type 2 patients Non-symptomatic gastritis is linked with metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects in patients with type 2 diabetes , a study finds. Gastritis occurs when the stomach lining becomes inflamed, which can cause stomach pain, vomiting and bloating following eating. This research comes from Yuxin Huang, MD, and colleagues from Shanghai Huadong Hospital, who obtained data - including demographic and laboratory data - from 144 patients with type 2 diabetes not put on to metformin . All subjects then began metformin treatment at 500 mg per day. This progressively increased over four weeks to 1500 mg per day, with gastrointestinal side effects, such as vomiting and nausea , monitored each week. The dose of metformin was adjusted accordingly depending on patients' symptoms. Following an endoscopy, 64 patients were categorised as non-gastritis subjects, with 80 classed as chronic gastritis subjects. At the beginning of the study, there were no differences in the groups for gastrointestinal symptoms. The mean final metformin dose was 706.24 mg for gastritis patients, which was significantly less than the mean dose used by non-gastritis patients, which was 1,101.56 mg. "Our data show for the first time that asymptomatic chronic gastritis predisposes to metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects," the researchers concluded. "However, the molecular mechanisms are still unclear and merit further investigation." Continue reading >>

Gastritis Linked To Metformin-related Gi Side Effects In T2dm

Gastritis Linked To Metformin-related Gi Side Effects In T2dm

Gastritis linked to metformin-related GI side effects in T2DM (HealthDay)For patients with type 2 diabetes, asymptomatic gastritis is associated with metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Yuxin Huang, M.D., from the Shanghai Huadong Hospital affiliated to Fudan University, and colleagues examined whether asymptomatic chronic gastritis could influence metformin tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data were included for 144 metformin-naive patients; all subjects started metformin at 500 mg/day and increased progressively to 1,500 mg/day over four weeks. Each week a score of gastrointestinal side effects was assessed, and metformin dose was adjusted as appropriate. The researchers categorized 64 patients as non-gastritis subjects and 80 as chronic gastritis subjects based on endoscopy. No statistical difference was seen between the groups for gastrointestinal symptoms at baseline. With metformin, the mean scores for abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and bloating were 1.02 versus 2.18 (P = 0.001), 0.20 versus 0.50 (P = 0.022), 0 versus 0.06 (P = 0.024), and 1.08 versus 1.71 (P = 0.028), respectively, for non-gastritis versus gastritis subjects, over four weeks. The mean final metformin doses were 706.24 and 1,101.56 mg for gastritis and non-gastritis subjects, respectively (P = 0.001). "Our data show for the first time that asymptomatic chronic gastritis predisposes to metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects," the authors write. "However, the molecular mechanisms are still unclear and merit further investigation." Continued metformin beneficial for diabetes with cirrhosis (HealthDay)Continuation of metformin therapy may improve survival in diabetes Continue reading >>

Metformin-related Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Metformin-related Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Medical and Geriatric Unit, Shatin Hospital, New Territories, Hong Kong, China Address correspondence to: Kin Wah Liu. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Medical and Geriatric Unit, Shatin Hospital, New Territories, Hong Kong, China Search for other works by this author on: Medical and Geriatric Unit, Shatin Hospital, New Territories, Hong Kong, China Search for other works by this author on: Age and Ageing, Volume 35, Issue 2, 1 March 2006, Pages 200201, Kin Wah Liu, Lok Kwan Dai, Woo Jean; Metformin-related vitamin B12 deficiency, Age and Ageing, Volume 35, Issue 2, 1 March 2006, Pages 200201, Metformin is an invaluable hypoglycaemic agent. We report two cases who had symptomatic vitamin B12 deficiency related to metformin use; the mechanisms are discussed. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of metformin-associated B12 deficiency in users who suffer cognitive impairment, peripheral neuropathy, subacute combined degeneration of the cord or anaemia. Metformin , elderly , Vitamin B12 deficiency The UK Prospective Diabetes Study Group 34 showed metformin to be an effective hypoglycaemic agent with less weight gain, and decreased hypoglycaemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and death [ 1 ]. Gastrointestinal side-effects and lactic acidosis related to metformin are commonly recognised; however, the associated vitamin B12 deficiency is less well known. Two cases illustrate the problem. An 82-year-old Asian non-vegetarian had type 2 diabetes mellitus for 20 years. Medications included metformin 1 g BD for many years and famotidine for gastritis. She presented with memory loss and progressive leg weakness. Her legs were hypotonic with decreased power, absent reflexes and bilateral extensor plantar reflexes. Vibration and propriocept Continue reading >>

Gastritis Tied To Metformin-related Gi Side Effects In Type 2 Diabetes

Gastritis Tied To Metformin-related Gi Side Effects In Type 2 Diabetes

Gastritis Tied to Metformin-Related GI Side Effects in Type 2 Diabetes Gastritis Tied to Metformin-Related GI Side Effects in Type 2 Diabetes Gastritis Tied to Metformin-Related GI Side Effects in Type 2 Diabetes (HealthDay News) For patients with type 2 diabetes , asymptomatic gastritis is associated with metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Yuxin Huang, MD, from the Shanghai Huadong Hospital affiliated to Fudan University, and colleagues examined whether asymptomatic chronic gastritis could influence metformin tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data were included for 144 metformin-naive patients; all subjects started metformin at 500 mg per day and increased progressively to 1,500 mg per day over 4 weeks. Each week a score of gastrointestinal side effects was assessed, and metformin dose was adjusted as appropriate. The researchers categorized 64 patients as non-gastritis subjects and 80 as chronic gastritis subjects based on endoscopy. No statistical difference was seen between the groups for gastrointestinal symptoms at baseline. With metformin, the mean scores for abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and bloating were 1.02 vs. 2.18 (P=.001), 0.20 vs. 0.50 (P=.022), 0 vs. 0.06 (P=.024) and 1.08 vs. 1.71 (P=.028), respectively, for non-gastritis vs. gastritis subjects, over 4 weeks. The mean final metformin doses were 706.24 mg and 1,101.56 mg for gastritis and non-gastritis subjects, respectively (P=.001). "Our data show for the first time that asymptomatic chronic gastritis predisposes to metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects," the researchers wrote. "However, the molecular mechanisms are still unclear and merit further investigation." Continue reading >>

Gastritis - Digestive Disorders - Merck Manuals Consumer Version

Gastritis - Digestive Disorders - Merck Manuals Consumer Version

Nonerosive gastritis can be caused by Helicobacter pylori infection . Infectious gastritis not caused by Helicobacter pylori is rare. Viral gastritis or fungal gastritis may develop in people who have had a prolonged illness or an impaired immune system, such as those who have AIDS or cancer or those who take immunosuppressant drugs. Acute stress gastritis, a form of erosive gastritis, is caused by a sudden illness or injury. The injury may not even be to the stomach. For example, extensive skin burns, head injuries, and injuries involving major bleeding are typical causes. Exactly why serious illness can lead to gastritis is not known but may be related to decreased blood flow to the stomach, an increase in the amount of acid in the stomach, and/or to impairment of the stomach lining's ability to protect and renew itself. Radiation gastritis can occur if radiation is delivered to the lower left side of the chest or upper abdomen, where it can irritate the stomach lining. Postgastrectomy gastritis occurs in people who have had part of their stomach surgically removed (a procedure called partial gastrectomy). The inflammation usually occurs where tissue has been sewn back together. Postgastrectomy gastritis is thought to result when surgery impairs blood flow to the stomach lining or exposes the stomach lining to an excessive amount of bile (the greenish yellow digestive fluid produced by the liver). Atrophic gastritis causes the stomach lining to become very thin (atrophic) and to lose many or all of the cells that produce acid and enzymes. This condition can occur when antibodies attack the stomach lining (termed autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis). Atrophic gastritis can also occur in some people who are chronically infected with H. pylori bacteria. It also te Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gastritis | Diabetic Connect

Diabetes And Gastritis | Diabetic Connect

I've been diagnosed with T2 since April this year. I was put on Metformin and all went well for a few months until in august I had some kind of GI infection, quite severe, but it passed. Thought all was well but then started having recurring milder infections finally culminating in one with fever etc. the Doctor finally gave me some antibiotics and it seems to have cleared up. But along with that I noticed that this can be a side effect of the Metformin. I also have pain in my feet, which is partly due to back injury and partly aggravated by the BG. I had started taking something called Wellness Nerve support formula, which didn't help my foot pain much but I had noticed that it sure improved my BG numbers, like to normal levels! I ran out of it and since it was expensive I looked for the ingredients elsewhere. It's synthetic B-12 and B-1. Found something from a company called Life Extension on Amazon of all places, it's called Mega BEnfotiamine 250 and is both water and fat souble. Got some and started taking two a day and my BG is once again in the normal range most of the time W/O Metformin. My guts are returning to normal as well. I do follow a very low carb diet but that wasn't quite cutting it before. After ten days I am finding I can eat a bit more carb (meaning the whole half a squash with some peas) than I could before and stay normal. I had a Mexican restaurant meal the other night and just had to eat some of the chips and salsa, (I break them into small pieces and eat mostly salsa that way) and that spiked my BG to 160 immediately after eating (1/2 hr) but an hour after that I was back to 98! You're doctor will not tell you about Thiamine as there is virtually no research here in the US. The capsules cost 15 cents each. Nobody is going to get rich on this! T Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Gastritis?

Can Metformin Cause Gastritis?

Clorazepam Rigevidon Weight Gain Belviq vs Phentermine Brintellix and Alcohol Nexplanon Weight Loss Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Does Metform Cause Indigestion/gastritis?

Does Metform Cause Indigestion/gastritis?

Does Metform Cause Indigestion/Gastritis? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does Metform Cause Indigestion/Gastritis? Does anyone have any experience of suffering gastritis/indigestion whilst taking Metformin? My partner has been taking Metformin since diagnosed (almost 3 years ago) and has tolerated them quite well - none of the usual diarrhoea - but a few months ago, he started to suffer indigestion, on and off. The doc has given him various remedies for this, but they've only helped temporarily. Strangely enough, at the time this problem started, his BG took an upward turn - I don't know if this is related or not - might just be a coincidence (?) (He always takes the Metformin with food). Has anyone had any experience of this please? All help and advise gratefully received - thanks guys When I was taking metformin to help me get preggers, I was taking 3000mg dialy. It made me very gassy. Fun to get busy with a gassy girl! Yes I think Metformin does seem to have that effect on some people - although with guys, it's hard to tell the difference sometimes Q7. What kind of side effects can GLUCOPHAGE cause? If side effects occur, they usually occur during the first few weeks of therapy. They are normally minor ones such as diarrhea, nausea and upset stomach. Taking your GLUCOPHAGE with meals can help reduce these side effects. Although these side effects are likely to go away, call your doctor if you have severe discomfort or if these effects last for more than a few weeks. Some patients may need to have their dose lowered or stop taking GLUCOPHAGE, either temporarily or permanently. Although these problems occur in up to one-t Continue reading >>

Metformin Xr And Gastritis

Metformin Xr And Gastritis

Author Topic: Metformin XR and gastritis (Read 2301 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. I'm still shaking my head over my own idiocy in not making the connection between metformin and my revived GI problems until now In February 2013, just before my diagnosis, I had a gastroscopy to investigate my IBS-like symptoms - everything was perfect, including no evidence of h. pylori, except for a small hiatal hernia. Part of the medical issues that led to my diabetes diagnosis was a resistant-strain UTI and was given 2 doses of antibiotics for the UTI and also started a grain free diet to try and control my BG, after which the majority of my GI symptoms completely disappeared. In particular I was able to stop taking Nexium for chronic reflux. Because of that I'm pretty convinced that the symptoms up till then were a combination of diet and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Even the symptoms that I'd previously associated with gallstones seemed to have resolved and the surgeon decided not to remove it despite the presence of 3 very large gallstones. Around January this year, I started taking 1x500mg metformin SR to try and lower my fasting BG which had been creeping up to the high 6's. I had the usual 3 days or so of GI upset which settled as predicted, however something insidious seems to have been going on behind the scenes. Gradually my GI issues resumed, worse than before, plus I was diagnosed with low iron. I went back to the same gastroenterologist and because of the previously clear gastroscopy, the next check was a colonoscopy in May which revealed only minor issues and definitely no source of occult bleeding to account for the low iron. Then I had a series of injections to rebuild my iron reserves, plus was referred to an upper GI specialist who w Continue reading >>

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