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Metformin Increased Energy

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Metformin may be one of the cheapest and most underused weight loss medications out there. Metformin is traditionally reserved for those with diabetes or insulin resistance, but many studies show that it can be effective in overweight or obese patients without diabetes. The only problem? You wouldn't know about it unless you do the research yourself! Use this post to learn everything you need to know about using metformin (both if you have diabetes or if you are simply just overweight): Metformin & How it May Help With Weight Loss Does metformin help with weight loss? The answer is more complex than just a standard "yes" or "no", instead the correct answer is more of a "maybe". What do I mean? Well metformin is a medication that falls into the class of biguanides. The most popular of these medications is metformin (and the topic of our discussion today) which is being used by at least 120 million people worldwide. Classically, metformin is used to treat blood sugar issues, insulin resistance and type II diabetes. It was found a long time ago, that if used for these conditions, metformin does indeed help some patients lose weight. Studies have shown that patients who take metformin with insulin resistance do tend to lose weight - most studies showing a "modest" amount to the tune of around 5-10 pounds. Because these studies have been favorable to some patients (especially those with the conditions listed above), it's normal to ask if it also works for patients who don't have type II diabetes. In order to understand that, we need to understand how metformin works. As it relates to weight loss metformin has powerful actions in 2 main areas: In the mitochondria respiratory chain complex: Activating the mitochondrial pathway is a powerful way to increase energy production an Continue reading >>

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation In L6 Muscle Cell Cultures

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation In L6 Muscle Cell Cultures

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation in L6 Muscle Cell Cultures * Corresponding author; email: ochsr{at}stjohns.edu Background: Metformin is widely believed to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Results: Metformin increased phosphocreatine recovery from dinitrophenol or azide in intact cells, increased MTT reduction, left ATP levels unchanged, and increased free AMP. Conclusion: Metformin stimulated mitochondrial energy production. Significance: Distinct mechanisms for metformin other than mitochondrial inhibition, such as the inhibition of breakdown of AMP proposed in our work, need to be pursued. A popular hypothesis for the action of metformin, the widely used anti-diabetes drug, is the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, specifically at complex I. This is consistent with metformin stimulation of glucose uptake by muscle and inhibition of gluconeogenesis by liver. Yet, mitochondrial inhibition is inconsistent with metformin stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in both tissues. In the present study we measured mitochondrial energy production in intact cells adapting an in vivo technique of phosphocreatine (PCr) formation following energy interruption (PCr recovery) to cell cultures. Metformin increased PCr recovery from either dinitrophenol (DNP) or azide in L6 cells. We found that metformin alone had no effect on cell viability as measured by total ATP concentration, trypan blue exclusion, or MTT reduction. However, treatments with low concentrations of DNP or azide reversibly decreased ATP concentration. Metformin increased MTT reduction during recovery from either agent. Viability measured by trypan blue exclusion indicated that cells were intact under these conditions. We also found that metformin increased free AMP, and to a smaller extent, fre Continue reading >>

Metformin Causes A Futile Intestinalhepatic Cycle Which Increases Energy Expenditure And Slows Down Development Of A Type 2 Diabetes-like State - Sciencedirect

Metformin Causes A Futile Intestinalhepatic Cycle Which Increases Energy Expenditure And Slows Down Development Of A Type 2 Diabetes-like State - Sciencedirect

Volume 6, Issue 7 , July 2017, Pages 737-747 Metformin causes a futile intestinalhepatic cycle which increases energy expenditure and slows down development of a type 2 diabetes-like state Orally administered metformin slowed down weight gain on a high fat diet. Metformin treatment led to increased energy expenditure, but decreased locomotion. Metformin treatment caused a futile, energy consuming glucoselactateglucose cycle. Metformin, the first line drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis and reduces body weight in patients, the latter by an unknown mechanism. Mice on a high fat diet were continuously fed metformin in a therapeutically relevant dose, mimicking a retarded formulation. Feeding metformin in pharmacologically relevant doses to mice on a high fat diet normalized HbA1c levels and ameliorated glucose tolerance, as expected, but also considerably slowed down weight gain. This was due to increased energy expenditure, since food intake was unchanged and locomotor activity was even decreased. Metformin caused lactate accumulation in the intestinal wall and in portal venous blood but not in peripheral blood or the liver. Increased conversion of glucose-1-13C to glucose-1,6-13C under metformin strongly supports a futile cycle of lactic acid production in the intestinal wall, and usage of the produced lactate for gluconeogenesis in liver. The reported glucoselactateglucose cycle is a highly energy consuming process, explaining the beneficial effects of metformin given continuously on the development of a type 2 diabetic-like state in our mice. Continue reading >>

The Energy Disruptor Metformin Targets Mitochondrial Integrity Via Modification Of Calcium Flux In Cancer Cells

The Energy Disruptor Metformin Targets Mitochondrial Integrity Via Modification Of Calcium Flux In Cancer Cells

The energy disruptor metformin targets mitochondrial integrity via modification of calcium flux in cancer cells Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:5040 (2017) Mitochondrial integrity is critical for the regulation of cellular energy and apoptosis. Metformin is an energy disruptor targeting complex I of the respiratory chain. We demonstrate that metformin induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium release from the ER and subsequent uptake of calcium into the mitochondria, thus leading to mitochondrial swelling. Metformin triggers the disorganization of the cristae and inner mitochondrial membrane in several cancer cells and tumors. Mechanistically, these alterations were found to be due to calcium entry into the mitochondria, because the swelling induced by metformin was reversed by the inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). We also demonstrated that metformin inhibits the opening of mPTP and induces mitochondrial biogenesis. Altogether, the inhibition of mPTP and the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis may account for the poor pro-apoptotic effect of metformin in cancer cells. Maintaining mitochondrial structural integrity is essential for cells to produce energy, overcome environmental stresses such as nutrient deprivation and hypoxia and respond to genotoxic agents, including chemotherapy. Consequently, the disruption of mitochondrial metabolism sensitizes cells to apoptosis and opens new therapeutic avenues in cancer treatment. Metformin is a biguanide and a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, but it is also a metabolic disruptor that specifically targets the metabolism of cancer cells 1 . Several reports have shown that this drug inhibits cancer cell growth and has antitumoral effects 2 , 3 . Biguanides inhibit the activity of the mi Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Anti-aging Miracle Drug

Metformin, The Anti-aging Miracle Drug

Metformin, The Anti-Aging Miracle Drug Diabetes Drugs Take A BAD RAP This article is part two of a series, for part one, click here. You probably think of Diabetes Drugs as all lumped together as “Bad Drugs”. For many years , I certainly did. Perhaps it was the Avandia story that gave Diabetes Drugs a Bad Rap and made us think poorly of ALL Diabetes Drugs. Upper Left Image: Photo of French Lilac Plant , the plant origin of Metformin, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Avandia, the “BAD Drug” for Diabetes Take the case of Avandia, approved in 1999, it quickly became the world’s best selling diabetes drug. However, 8 years later, the New England Journal reported that Avandia causes increased heart attack rates, and sales were suspended in Europe.(1A) In November 2011, GlaxoSmithKline admitted they withheld safety data on Avandia and agreed to pay the US government 3 billion in civil and criminal penalties related to illegal marketing. The Avandia case gave all diabetes drugs a “Bad Rap”. The reality is that there is one diabetes drug that has stood the test of time, and is in fact a “Good Drug”. This is Metformin. Perhaps the plant origin of the drug makes it a “good drug”. Metformin, the “Good Drug” Is There Anyone Who Should not Take It ? At the May 2012 Orlando A4M Meeting, Terry Grossman, M.D. from Golden Colorado gave an excellent presentation on Metformin. Credit and thanks goes to Terry Grossman MD for sharing his talk at the meeting with all of us. Much of this article comes from Grossman’s PowerPoint slides. Dr Terry Grossman is co-author of the Ray Kurzweil book, Fantastic Voyage. Upper Left Image : Photo of Terry Grossman MD, courtesy of Terry Grossman MD. Metformin by Terry Grossman MD- Metformin Discovery and Approval Discovered in the Continue reading >>

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation In L6 Muscle Cell Cultures

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation In L6 Muscle Cell Cultures

Metformin Increases Mitochondrial Energy Formation in L6 Muscle Cell Cultures From the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, St. John's University, Queens, New York 11439 2 To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel.: 718-990-1678; Fax: 718-990-1936; E-mail: ochsr{at}stjohns.edu. 1 Present address: 8205 Vinoy Blvd., Apt. 308, Charlotte, NC 28262. E-mail: vsatyavylta{at}gmail.com. Background: Metformin is widely believed to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Results: Metformin increased phosphocreatine recovery from dinitrophenol or azide in intact cells, increased MTT reduction, left ATP levels unchanged, and increased free AMP. Conclusion: Metformin stimulated mitochondrial energy production. Significance: Distinct mechanisms for metformin other than mitochondrial inhibition, such as the inhibition of breakdown of AMP proposed in our work, need to be pursued. A popular hypothesis for the action of metformin, the widely used anti-diabetes drug, is the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, specifically at complex I. This is consistent with metformin stimulation of glucose uptake by muscle and inhibition of gluconeogenesis by liver. Yet, mitochondrial inhibition is inconsistent with metformin stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in both tissues. In this study, we measured mitochondrial energy production in intact cells adapting an in vivo technique of phosphocreatine (PCr) formation following energy interruption (PCr recovery) to cell cultures. Metformin increased PCr recovery from either dinitrophenol (DNP) or azide in L6 cells. We found that metformin alone had no effect on cell viability as measured by total ATP concentration, trypan blue exclusion, or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reductio Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Popular Drug Damages Your Cells But Fasting Delivers Energy Jessica came to see me because she had been diagnosed with a condition that is becoming more and more common – PCOS. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is a problem of the adrenal glands that causes: Irregular menstrual cycles Easy fatiguing And even diabetes Jessica was prescribed a diabetes medication called metformin (tradename Glucophage) that seems to help metabolic problems. It also allows people to burn fat so they stop gaining weight. This drug is a first-line therapy for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and has been used for many years. It has the effect of making the body more sensitive to insulin and blocking the liver from putting out more sugar. The net effect of this is to lower blood sugar levels. However, metformin’s specific action reaches deeper into your cells. It blocks the mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cells of your body, from using sugar efficiently. When cells are unable to use sugar, they must switch to fat-burning mode. With the ability to burn fat, the body has lower sugar levels and can actually lose weight! The effect of metformin has been trumpeted for many years. Metformin: Decreases blood glucose Increases fat use Prevents kidney problems Improves PCOS in women Prevents diabetes Lowers cancer rates [1] Because of these effects metformin is now being considered and used for many conditions including: Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Cancers of all types Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Obesity Indeed, as one of my professors stated, it seems that metformin should be “included in the drinking water.” Everyone would supposedly benefit. Many without diabetes, PCOS, or even pre-diabetes are taking it to prevent diabetes and cancer. Beware of Treating Disease with Metformin All of the symptoms and di Continue reading >>

Energy Disruptors: Rising Stars In Anticancer Therapy?

Energy Disruptors: Rising Stars In Anticancer Therapy?

Energy disruptors: rising stars in anticancer therapy? The metabolic features of tumor cells diverge from those of normal cells. Otto Warburg was the first to observe that cancer cells dramatically increase their glucose consumption to generate ATP. He also claimed that cancer cells do not have functional mitochondria or oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) but simply rely on glycolysis to provide ATP to the cell, even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis). Several studies have revisited this observation and demonstrated that most cancer cells contain metabolically efficient mitochondria. Indeed, to sustain high proliferation rates, cancer cells require functional mitochondria to provide ATP and intermediate metabolites, such as citrate and cofactors, for anabolic reactions. This difference in metabolism between normal and tumors cells causes the latter to be more sensitive to agents that can disrupt energy homeostasis. In this review, we focus on energy disruptors, such as biguanides, 2-deoxyglucose and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, that interfere with the main metabolic pathways of the cells, OXPHOS, glycolysis and glutamine metabolism. We discuss the preclinical data and the mechanisms of action of these disruptors at the cellular and molecular levels. Finally, we consider whether these drugs can reasonably contribute to the antitumoral therapeutic arsenal in the future. Cancer cells are characterized by uncontrolled and rapid proliferation. Deregulation of the cell division machinery requires metabolic adjustments to provide macromolecules and energy to fuel cell growth and division. In the presence of oxygen, glucose is converted via glycolysis into pyruvate, which is then transported to the mitochondria to be transformed into acetyl-CoA by Continue reading >>

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has metformin improved your energy and mood? If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Hi! I'm brand new to the site. I was just diagnosed with PCOS on Monday and started Metformin the same day. I definitely have had more energy these last three days! I haven't gotten that sluggishness in the middle of the day - I've been able to keep going all day. My endocrinologist said to expect more energy. She explained that before with my insulin resistance my body just took all the food I was eating and immediately stored it away as fat, leaving my muscles with hardly anything to run on. This is why I always felt tired and like I needed to keep eating all the time for energy. So now that my body is actually using the food I eat for energy - I actually have some! My mood also feels more stable. I think this is because I'm not getting hypoglycemic (sp?) between meals. Love, love, love the metformin so far!!! Hi, I've been taking 1500mg for the last 23 days and felt better almost straightaway. I was diagnosed with PCOS in '96 but was finally diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Type II on the 6th of April (I suspected I've had it for years though, but no doctor would listen!) I no longer feel tired and unable to get out of bed in the morning. I am full of energy, have been exercising daily and feel so positive. My DH has also commented that I haven't been snappy or irritable this month. Maybe it is partly a placebo effect as I have been fighting to get on Met for years. But I wake before my alarm every morning now, with the same number of hours sleep an Continue reading >>

Will You Have Energy Increased With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Energy Increased With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 71 year old man who takes Carbo/levo/entacapone 200 NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Beneficial Effects Of Metformin On Energy Metabolism And Visceral Fat Volume Through A Possible Mechanism Of Fatty Acid Oxidation In Human Subjects And Rats

Beneficial Effects Of Metformin On Energy Metabolism And Visceral Fat Volume Through A Possible Mechanism Of Fatty Acid Oxidation In Human Subjects And Rats

Beneficial effects of metformin on energy metabolism and visceral fat volume through a possible mechanism of fatty acid oxidation in human subjects and rats 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan 2Institute of Animal Experimentation, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Received 2015 Sep 11; Accepted 2017 Jan 19. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Metformin is known to have a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition, although the precise mechanism has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of metformin on energy metabolism and anthropometric factors in both human subjects and rats. In human studies, metformin (1500mg/day) was administered to 23 healthy subjects and 18 patients with type 2 diabetes for 2 weeks. Metabolic parameters and energy metabolism were measured during a meal tolerance test in the morning before and after the treatment of metformin. In animal studies, 13 weeks old SD rats were fed 2526 g of standard chow only during 12-hours dark phase with either treated by metformin (2.5mg/ml in drinking water) or not for 2 weeks, and metabolic parameters, anthropometric factors and energy metabolism together with expressions related to fat oxidation and adaptive thermogenesis were measured either in fasting or post-prandial state at 15 weeks old. Post-prandial plasma lactate concentration was significantly increased after the metfo Continue reading >>

Metformin Experience - Watch Out!

Metformin Experience - Watch Out!

OK, NOT "medical advice". That's illegal and not allowed here. So, if I "suggest" anything below take it with all the appropriate disclaimers like "ASK YOUR DOCTOR FIRST" yada yada. Do not make changes to your treatment regimen based on anything I say. I'm just a civilian. After 7 years of zero medication or insulin (and normal blood sugar), I felt my morning numbers were creeping up - although still in normal range - and so decided to give Metformin a try. I did a single 1000mg tablet before bed for 2 weeks and then went to 2000mg per day, one tablet morning and night. The only side effect I was looking for was GI problems. It didn't seem to have any clear impact on blood sugar at all. The GI problems were nothing major. I had to learn that I need to take it about 2 - 3 hours after eating to minimize that. Some random discomfort here and there and one or two slightly more serious episodes during the entire time - something I'd probably put up with if I found any benefit and no other side effects. I stayed on it for about 10 weeks or 2-1/2 months. Nothing apparent changed. I had also started taking thyroxin for slightly elevated TSH (slightly low thyroid) at the same time. I noticed subtle but CLEAR decreases in both motor and cognitive abilities and energy levels. (I have my own ways of assessing those, but that's another story.) I totally blamed it on the thyroxin although I did think that was ironic because if my thyroid was really hypo and I took that the effect should be exactly the opposite, increased energy and clearer cognitive function. Then, I stopped Metformin. I only did this because I finished one sensor with my Freestyle Libre and decided to "de-tox" for 2 weeks and then do another sensor without Metformin. Over the next 2 - 3 days - BANG! What happened? Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

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