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Metformin Improves Mood

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

Metformin - What Are The Side Effects? Any Changes In Mood Noticed Please?

Metformin - What Are The Side Effects? Any Changes In Mood Noticed Please?

Metformin - What are the side effects? Any changes in mood noticed please? Metformin - What are the side effects? Any changes in mood noticed please? I was diagnosed type 2 Diabetes in May this year and given Metformin straight away 2x 500mg a day as my fasting Glucose level was 22!! Shortly afterwards I started having symptoms of what I now know to be Anxiety and Panic disorder and by July I had stopped taking Metformin, and after a disasterous few days of taking Fluxoteen (Prozac) which made me feel suicidal I was given Diazepam just to get some rest. To cut a long story short I cut down the Diazepam little by little and now take nothing and have just started back at work on a phased return. Now that I am facing things again I realise that |I must take control of the Diabetes and need to start taking Metformin again and looking at my diet as I had a couple of months when I hardly ate and I am now eating far too much fat/sugar/carbs. My problem is that because my anxiety problems started around the same time I started the Metformin I cannot bring myself to take them again as the fear of being in the grip of anxiety and panic scares me so much. I know that the Metformin are unlikely to have contributed to me being mentally ill I would just like to hear from people with experience of Metformin and any side affects they had and how long it took to get used to them. Thanks I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 and am still finding out about this condition but started with Metformin one a day, now up to two a day, I had one day of tummy problems, but am OK if I make sure I take them in the middle of a meal, I am still waiting to talk to a dietician as I was on a diet when I found out because I have to major surgery due to osteoartritis - still to find out how this wil Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (or Glucophage) for polycystic ovararian symdrome (PCOS) by Kelly Why would you be taking metformin or glucophage (metformin is the generic for glucophage) Metformin is a diabetes medicine used for lowering insulin and blood sugar levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This helps regulate menstrual cycles, start ovulation, and lower the risk of miscarriage in women with PCOS. It is generally used in conjuction with clomid. The most common side effects of metformin Nausea. Loss of appetite. Diarrhea. Increased abdominal gas. A metallic taste. Tiredness. Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. I’ve been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. My personal tips Always take with food or a glass of milk – I always take my Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Had A Psychiatric Response To Metformin?

Has Anyone Had A Psychiatric Response To Metformin?

Has anyone had a psychiatric response to Metformin? New Member Diagnoses Metabolic Syndrom or Pre-Diabetes not sr Has anyone had a psychiatric response to Metformin? When I was taking Metformin for a bit over two weeks I was having this horrible aggresion, anger, hostility, just this horrible horrible mood. At the same time I had increased a beta blocker called Betaxolol. I was not sure if one of the other caused this awful mood in me so I stopped them both the same night and the next day Ifelt better that quick. I've since gone back on the beta blocker and the moods have not returned, so wondering how can Metformin cause me to react that way. I did check my BS during those times and for the most part it was in the 90's or slightly higher depending on what I had eaten. Idont know what happened to me, not sure if it didnt mix wiht the beta blocker or what. I should of stopped one at a time to see but I messed up. Now Iwant to go backon the metformin especially after today seeing my fasting back up to 99 and to 114 an hour after that without eating...and 3 hours after a mcdonalds egg mcmuffin it was still at 112, so was really bummed at that too....shows me that Met was really helping in just that short of time. I read alot of people say they felt better on it but I dont know what that means cause I didnt feel any better but my numbers were great! So just wondering if anyone felt crazy with Met..thanks! D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Some report anger just with higher bs numbers, having your bs out of sorts puts the whole body that way. When I was very high I was very angry and I do mean very angry but more at myself and sometimes at others. When I got my bs down to the 200 level it got better, my sugar for along time ran in the 300s and 400s so 200s seem pre Continue reading >>

Metformin Mood Swings

Metformin Mood Swings

I was diagnosed at the end of March. I have been on Metformin for about 2 months. I have always been an even keeled guy and let things roll off my back. Since I have been taking meds the littlest things tick me off and I will fly off the handle. Is this just me, or does Metformin effect moods in other people. I really need to get control of this. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. I know I had some mood swings as my blood glucose was falling. I still do if I haven't eaten--I get crabby until I eat. So for me, it wasn't the metformin but rather my glucose improving. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I would say its more your bg what do your daily test show. When my bg was high I would get that way, if you were higher in the past and are not going lower I can see the swings that happened to me. Oh and at the time I was not on met it was just my bg coming down. I am usually 115ish in the morning and 93 in the evening. I was 131 yesterday evening but we figured it was because I drank a low cal sports drink right before I took it. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I am usually 115ish in the morning and 93 in the evening. I was 131 yesterday evening but we figured it was because I drank a low cal sports drink right before I took it. My question what level were you when dx, I ran very high and when I got lower moods swings were strong. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Sorry that means diagnosis, what level you months or a year ago, as numbers drop our moods can change. I was hospitalized with keto acidosis on March 28th. I was over 400 at that point my a1c was 12.5. I was put on insulin and took a couple weeks to figure out my diet and get my blood sugar below 120. After about 5 weeks I was put on a combination of metformin Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet, Inflammation And Metformin

Paleo Diet, Inflammation And Metformin

I wish life were simple. I guess it is in a way, you live, you die. But the pesky in-between parts, the details can be decidedly non-simple. Heck, they might even be complex! The paleo diet, or more accurately the paleo template, which includes thinking about sleep, lifestyle, photoperiod and socialization, is simple on the surface: Food: Fish, fowl, meat, roots, tubers, fruits, veggies, and good fats. Socialization: Have a solid support network. Dont Go Ted Kaczynski on us. Photoperiod: Get up with the chickens, go to bed with the same. See, simple! Well, until folks want to know how many carbs they need (it depends) if fruit is good or bad (again, it kinda depends) what constitutes good fats. These details can get murky, but its not that hard to navigate folks through the Paleo Template to help them dial things in for best effect. With that in mind, if you need extra help dialing things in, check out Chris Kressers Personal Paleo Code. Be your issue autoimmunity, fat loss or you just want a little hand holding, that program has the goods. With the infomercial out of the way, we can get down to the things I really want to talk about in this installment: the paleo diet, inflammation and the drug metformin. This will be at once simple, as Im going to present what I suspect is the root cause of a host of issues related to inflammation, insulin resistance, cancer, autoimmunity and neurodegeneration; namely intestinal permeability (leaky gut in the hippy circles). This is simple in that we may have a common mechanism that underlies all of these conditions. It is complex in that we have a myriad of ways to induce permeable gut and once that happens the ensuing metabolic and immunologic cascades can be tough to keep track of. If you asked me 10 years ago Whats the cause of a Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin? And Is It Right For You?

What Is Metformin? And Is It Right For You?

Are you one of the millions of women who’ve been diagnosed with PCOS or high blood sugar? Do you struggle every day with symptoms like excessive weight, mood swings, infertility, facial hair or acne? When you’re dealing with such terrible symptoms, finding a solution becomes your top priority. Hi, I’m Robin Nielsen, the Chief Wellness Officer here at Insulite Health. I’m so glad you’re here. I’ve personally experienced symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS, and I know the difficult challenges you face. Perhaps you’re wondering if prescription drugs might be that solution. In fact your doctor may suggest the drug Metformin, also known as Glucophage. What is Metformin, and is it right for you? Metformin is a drug originally used to treat high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s sometimes prescribed to women with PCOS because both diabetes and PCOS share an underlying cause. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help get sugar into our cells to burn for fuel. I call insulin the key that unlocks the cell. Insulin resistance occurs when your body’s cells resist the effects of insulin, causing you to produce even more insulin and actually store the sugar in the blood as fat, here around your middle. Too much insulin leads to an imbalance of hormones, especially sex hormones. Metformin can improve your body’s response to insulin at the cellular level, so your body produces less insulin, which can stabilize your hormonal levels and lower blood sugar. Women who take Metformin for PCOS may see improvements in some of their symptoms, such as hirsutism, irregular menstrual cycles, and weight gain, but not without a price. Metformin’s use is associated with many side effects, some potentially serious or even life-threatening. Dig Continue reading >>

Mood Swings/depression With Pcos Treatment?

Mood Swings/depression With Pcos Treatment?

Mood swings/depression with pcos treatment? Mood swings/depression with pcos treatment? Hi all, this is my first post. I was just diagnosed with PCOS about 3 months ago and was prescribed Metformin and Seasonique, which have helped a lot with the sugar cravings and the constant weight gain I had for over a year. I have actually lost 10 lbs. The bad part of it is, I feel like I've never been a woman before now :-) I just have such wild mood swings. I get extremely depressed about how I look and normal girl stuff, then I get really angry and frustrated, and then I'll be fine five minutes later, etc. I feel crazy! These feelings aren't every day, I'll have a few normal days, and then 3 or 4 of these "crazy days," where my mood changes every five minutes. I assure you all, I never feel the need to hurt myself or anything of that sort, but I am wondering if this is normal for the first few months. I had bad side effects during the first week of metformin (stomach-related, not mood), and now it's fine. I had zero mood swings for the first month on seasonique, but starting in the second month (I'm almost into the 3rd now) was when I started having mood swings. Is this worth it? I am really loving the seasonique, but my boyfriend (who is amazing and completely understanding!) very gently suggested that if the mood swings don't improve, I may want to ask my doctor about starting a mild antidepressant, and I have to agree that it may be a necessity. I hate taking pills, it took me a week to start taking metformin at first because I so hate taking pills and relying on them, but if it means the mood swings will stop I think I would rather take pills. Could some of you give me your thoughts on this, and share similar experiences and what was done about it, etc.? Thanks for reading Continue reading >>

Metformin And Mood? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Metformin And Mood? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community So I've been on Metformin for a little over a week. Started with 500mg/day and now trying 1,000mg But I've been feeling a bit.. wired, ie more alert, caffeine kind of buzz. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but is it to be expected? I've also been reducing carb intake, so curious if it's a case of coming down from a hyperglycemic state. I've got my introduction to diabetes session with the GPs tomorrow so will also be asking them. And thanks to this forum, am a bit more prepared DavidGrahamJones Type 2 Well-Known Member I can only guess that it's the lower carb and lower BG making a difference. I find that taking Metformin and putting up with the side effects can make me very anxious and that's something that people around me have noticed. They don't realise that feeling I need a bathroom at a moments notice does do things to the way I behave. I can only guess that it's the lower carb and lower BG making a difference. I find that taking Metformin and putting up with the side effects can make me very anxious and that's something that people around me have noticed. They don't realise that feeling I need a bathroom at a moments notice does do things to the way I behave. Ive taken myself off 2 x 1000mg of met due to a few near misses .. I just take one in the evening now . Doc didnt approve but then he also doesnt approve of me testing either Ive taken myself off 2 x 1000mg of met due to a few near misses .. I just take one in the evening now . Doc didnt approve but then he also doesnt approve of me testing either Sounds like time for a doc upgrade.. is that feasible? Maybe try for a more up to date model... ! Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Continue reading >>

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has metformin improved your energy and mood? If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Hi! I'm brand new to the site. I was just diagnosed with PCOS on Monday and started Metformin the same day. I definitely have had more energy these last three days! I haven't gotten that sluggishness in the middle of the day - I've been able to keep going all day. My endocrinologist said to expect more energy. She explained that before with my insulin resistance my body just took all the food I was eating and immediately stored it away as fat, leaving my muscles with hardly anything to run on. This is why I always felt tired and like I needed to keep eating all the time for energy. So now that my body is actually using the food I eat for energy - I actually have some! My mood also feels more stable. I think this is because I'm not getting hypoglycemic (sp?) between meals. Love, love, love the metformin so far!!! Hi, I've been taking 1500mg for the last 23 days and felt better almost straightaway. I was diagnosed with PCOS in '96 but was finally diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Type II on the 6th of April (I suspected I've had it for years though, but no doctor would listen!) I no longer feel tired and unable to get out of bed in the morning. I am full of energy, have been exercising daily and feel so positive. My DH has also commented that I haven't been snappy or irritable this month. Maybe it is partly a placebo effect as I have been fighting to get on Met for years. But I wake before my alarm every morning now, with the same number of hours sleep an Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Exercise But Not Metformin Improves Health-related Quality Of Life And Mood States In Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

Exercise But Not Metformin Improves Health-related Quality Of Life And Mood States In Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

Exercise but not metformin improves health-related quality of life and mood states in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Baptista LC, et al. Eur J Sport Sci. 2017. a Faculdade de Cincias do Desporto e Educao Fsica , Universidade de Coimbra , Coimbra , Portugal. Eur J Sport Sci. 2017 Jul;17(6):794-804. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2017.1310933. Epub 2017 Apr 10. The aim of this cohort study is to analyse the effect of three types of treatment: (i) exercise training with multicomponent exercise (E); (ii) pharmacologic treatment with oral hypoglycaemic drug - metformin (M); and (iii) a combined therapy - exercise and metformin (E + M) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood states in older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with comorbidity in an early stage of the disease. Participants (n = 284) underwent 1 of the following 3 conditions: (i) E (n = 59) trained three times/week; (ii) M (n = 30) used 850 mg of metformin twice daily; and (iii) E + M (n = 195) combined exercise and metformin. Furthermore, participants completed baseline and 2-year follow-up evaluations including a Shortform Health Survey 36, Profile of Mood States - Short-form, the health history questionnaires, anthropometric, and blood biochemistry. E and E + M revealed improved mood states, with large effect size on the vigour domain, and moderate effect size in the anger and total mood disturbance (TMD) domains (P < 0.05), in comparison with the M group. After 24 months' intervention, the E and E + M groups perceived better physical and mental HRQoL than the M group. The M group unchanged HRQoL domains (P > 0.05). Metformin had no significant effect on the self-referred HRQoL in T2D participants aged above 60 years, in an early stage of the disease. The E and E + M were the most effective long-term th Continue reading >>

Metformin May Produce Antidepressant Effects Through Improvement Of Cognitive Function Among Depressed Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Metformin May Produce Antidepressant Effects Through Improvement Of Cognitive Function Among Depressed Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Diabetes mellitus and depressive disorders are both common chronic diseases that increase functional disability and social burden. Cognitive impairment is a potentially debilitating feature of depression. Previous evidence has revealed that the antidiabetic drug metformin could be suitable for diabetic patients with cognitive impairment. However, there is no direct evidence from clinical studies that metformin treatment improves cognitive function in diabetic patients suffering from depression. In this study 58 participants, diagnosed with depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus, were recruited and divided into two groups: one treated with metformin and one with placebo for 24 weeks. Cognitive function, depressive behavior and diabetes improvement were evaluated. Chronic treatment with metformin for 24 weeks improved cognitive performance assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) in depressed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, metformin significantly improved depressive performance and changed the glucose metabolism in depressed patients with diabetes. Depressive symptoms negatively correlated with the cognitive performance in metformin-treated participants. Furthermore, associations were also observed between the parameters of blood glucose metabolism and the depression phenotype. These findings suggested that chronic treatment with metformin produced antidepressant behavioral effects, and that improved cognitive function is involved in the therapeutic outcome of metformin. The current results also raised the possibility that supplementary administration of antidiabetic medications might enhance the recovery of depression, co-morbid with type 2 diabetes mellitus, through improvements in cognitive performance.This article is protec Continue reading >>

Metabolic Holy Grail?

Metabolic Holy Grail?

Top scientists agree that metformin is an antiaging drug … Is Metformin the Treatment with metformin mimics some of the benefits of calorie restriction By Will Block M etformin is an oral antidiabetic drug used for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose, insulin resistance, and relative insulin deficiency (even though insulin levels are higher than normal). It is also used for metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, prediabetic conditions. Metformin was introduced in Europe in 1958, and Canada in 1972. However, it was not until 1995 that the FDA got around to approving it in the United States. Falsely conflating it with the drug phenformin,* the FDA deemed that metformin research and clinical experience performed and gathered outside the US was substandard. In truth, metformin is much safer than phenformin, as the data show.1 “If the same criteria were used for older people as are used for younger people, nearly every senior citizen would be diagnosed as diabetic.” Plus, then as now, the FDA moaned that it had been “hobbled” by budgetary considerations. Compared to the National Institutes of Health’s budget ($31.3 billion requested for this fiscal year vs. $4.9 billion for the FDA), the FDA claims it doesn’t have enough to afford the regulatory work required for speedy approval.† Despite the retardation of its acceptance, metformin is now believed to be the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drug in the world and in the United States alone, more than 48 million prescriptions were filled in 2010 for its generic formulations. * Phenformin had been withdrawn in 1976 due to the stupidity of certain doctors who continued to prescribe it in the face of abnormal liver or kidney function. See ref. #2. † Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

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