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Metformin Impotence

Small Problem - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Small Problem - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have a problem !!! Ever since i started taking METFORMIN. My little man got way smaller, sometimes he never even makes a showing. I'm 36, NOT READY TO GIVE UP SEX !!!! I blame it on the medication. I was in the hospital (not diabetic reasons) and stopped taking METFORMIN. It was like night and day, the meds were the cause. In the hospital I was given insulin and didn't have the same small problem. Please Please, I know this could be an embarrassing subject but please help I don't think you are alone with these issues. Hopefully another man will see this and come along to offer advice/suggestions. I take 2000 mg of Metformin every day - no problems. I just googled "metformin erectile dysfunction" and got a lot of hits. Check that out and maybe you'll find something. Let us know. I'm not taking meds for diabetes, or anything else fortunately. Someday my efforts to manage lifestyle and stay healthy enough to forgo meds will be overcome by the progression of diabetes. My doc agrees in principle to taking lifestyle as far as possible and then going straight to insulin. There are a couple of reasons why it has become the norm to use drugs like Metformin and put off insulin as "a last resort". People don't like needles. Doctors t-h-i-n-k people don't like needles. If you have weight to lose - lose it. If your diet can be improved - improve it. Take care of your teeth, get plenty of sleep, practice stress management and so on. If you can get off meds your problem is solved. If you still need help then talk to your doctor about quitting Metformin and other oral meds and start on insulin. My reaction Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction (ed): Is There A Connection?

Type 2 Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction (ed): Is There A Connection?

Although diabetes and erectile dysfunction (ED) are two separate conditions, they tend to go hand-in-hand. ED is defined as having difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to develop ED. When men ages 45 and under develop ED, it may be a sign of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes occurs when you have too much sugar circulating in your bloodstream. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, which affects less than 10 percent of those who have diabetes, and type 2 diabetes, which accounts for over 90 percent of diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes often develops as a result of being overweight or inactive. Approximately 30 million Americans have diabetes, and about half of them are men. An estimated 10 percent of men ages 40 to 70 have severe ED, and another 25 percent have moderate ED. ED tends to become more common as men age, though it isn’t an inevitable part of aging. For many men, other health conditions, such as diabetes, contribute to the likelihood of developing ED. The Boston University Medical Center reports that about half of men who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes will develop ED within five to 10 years of their diagnosis. If those men also have heart disease, their odds of becoming impotent are even greater. However, the results of a 2014 study suggest that if you have diabetes but adopt a healthier lifestyle, you may reduce your diabetes symptoms and improve your sexual health. These lifestyle habits include eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise. The connection between diabetes and ED is related to your circulation and nervous system. Poorly controlled blood sugar levels can damage small blood vessels and nerves. Damage to the nerves that control sexual stimulation and respons Continue reading >>

Metformin And Impotence - From Fda Reports

Metformin And Impotence - From Fda Reports

Impotence is found among people who take Metformin, especially for people who are male, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for < 1 month, also take medication Aspirin, and have High blood cholesterol. This review analyzes which people have Impotence with Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 199,020 people who have side effects when taking Metformin from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Metformin and have Impotence, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Metformin and have Impotence Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 30 % 1 - 6 months: 0.0 % 6 - 12 months: 0.0 % 1 - 2 years: 20 % 2 - 5 years: 20 % 5 - 10 years: 10 % 10+ years: 20 % Gender of people who have Impotence when taking Metformin *: female: 6.16 % male: 93.84 % Age of people who have Impotence when taking Metformin *: 0-1: 0.0 % 2-9: 0.0 % 10-19: 0.0 % 20-29: 2.31 % 30-39: 6.67 % 40-49: 16.15 % 50-59: 34.87 % 60+: 40.0 % Top conditions involved for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol (61 people, 12.13%) High Blood Pressure (56 people, 11.13%) Depression (47 people, 9.34%) Stress And Anxiety (32 people, 6.36%) Bipolar Disorder (21 people, 4.17%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Aspirin (89 people, 17.69%) Lisinopril (78 people, 15.51%) Viagra (67 people, 13.32%) Levitra (63 people, 12.52%) Glipizide (57 people, 11.33%) Top other side effects for these people *: Fatigue (101 people, 20.08%) High Blood Pressure (61 people, 12.13%) Stress And Anxiety Continue reading >>

When Viagra Doesn’t Work

When Viagra Doesn’t Work

Treating Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a common occurrence in men with diabetes. The incidence of erectile dysfunction increases progressively with age, from 5% in men age 20 to 75% in men over age 65. The cause of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes is usually related to a decrease in the blood supply to the penis as well as to injury to the nerves that are responsible for the erection mechanism. A decrease in testosterone production has also been identified as the cause in some men with diabetes. Since 1998, when sildenafil (brand name Viagra) first came on the market, oral therapy has been successfully used to treat erectile dysfunction in many men with diabetes. (Sildenafil was followed in 2003 by the drugs tadalafil [Cialis], vardenafil [Levitra] and avanafil [Stendra], which work in much the same way.) Some 50% of men with Type 1 diabetes who try the drugs report improved erections, and some 60% men with Type 2 diabetes do, too. However, that leaves a large percentage of men with diabetes and erectile dysfunction who do not respond to therapy with one of these pills. This article takes a look at what can be done to treat those men who do not respond to oral therapy. Why therapy fails There are a number of reasons a man may not achieve the desired result from an oral erectile dysfunction drug. In some cases, a man may experience drug side effects severe enough to outweigh any potential benefit of taking the drug. Possible side effects of these drugs include headache, facial flushing, nasal congestion, and transient abnormal vision. (In October 2007, the FDA added a warning about sudden hearing loss to the package labels of oral erectile dysfunction drugs. While it’s not absolutely clear that the drugs can cause sudden hearing loss, a number o Continue reading >>

Metformin Medication May Help Treat Erectile Dysfunction

Metformin Medication May Help Treat Erectile Dysfunction

New research suggests that the widely used type 2 diabetes drug metformin could double as a treatment for men with erection problems. In addition to helping people with type 2 diabetes keep control of their blood sugar levels, scientists at Georgia Health Sciences University in the US believe metformin may also provide an alternative option to anti-impotence drugs such as Viagra. Results from laboratory tests at the University, published online in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, showed the diabetes medication may improve erectile function by increasing levels of the naturally occurring chemical nitric oxide in the body. This makes blood vessels in the genital area more flexible and dilated, thus increasing the flow of blood into the penis. However, the tests were only conducted on laboratory rats so it is unclear whether the drug would have the same effect in humans. "Metformin is an old, cheap, well-tried and tested drug which is usually well tolerated," commented Dr David Edwards, a GP who runs the male sexual health clinic at the Oxfordshire-based White House Surgery. "But it was only used for 28 days, which is a short time, and just in rats. Many diabetics are already on metformin and yet erectile dysfunction is very common in this group. It may be that their problems might be worse if they were not on the drug." 10% of men in the UK experience erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. Among people diagnosed with diabetes, it is even more common with up to 75% of diabetic men experiencing erection problems during their lifetime. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being Continue reading >>

Drugs Linked To Erectile Dysfunction

Drugs Linked To Erectile Dysfunction

If you are having problems achieving or maintaining an erection you may want to take a look at your medicine cabinet first. There are a number of prescription and over-the-counter drugs that may cause erectile dysfunction. While these drugs may treat a disease or condition, they can also affect a man's hormones, nerves, or blood circulation, resulting in ED or increase the risk of ED. Drugs that may cause ED are listed below. The list of possible offenders is long, so check with your doctor regarding medications you are taking to rule out any as a cause of, or contributor to, ED. TYPE OF DRUG GENERIC AND BRAND NAMES Diuretics and high blood pressure drugs Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL, Hydropres, Inderide, Moduretic, Oretic, Lotensin) Chlorthalidone (Hygroton) Triamterene (Maxide, Dyazide) Furosemide (Lasix) Bumetanide (Bumex) Guanfacine (Tenex) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Clonidine (Catapres) Verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) Nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia) Hydralazine (Apresoline) Captopril (Capoten) Enalapril (Vasotec) Metoprolol (Lopressor) Propranolol (Inderal) Labetalol (Normodyne) Atenolol (Tenormin) Phenoxybenzamine (Dibenzyline) Spironolactone (Aldactone) Antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and antiepileptic drugs Fluoxetine (Prozac) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Sertraline (Zoloft) Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Amitriptyline (Elavil) Amoxipine (Asendin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin) Nortriptyline (Pamelor) Phenelzine (Nardil) Buspirone (Buspar) Chlordiazepoxide (Librium) Clorazepate (Tranxene) Diazepam (Valium) Doxepin (Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lorazepam (Ativan) Oxazepam (Serax) Phenytoin (Dilantin) Antihistamines Dimehydrinate (Dramamine) Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) Hydroxyzine (Vistaril) Meclizine (Antivert) Promethazine (Phenergan) No Continue reading >>

Metformin And Erectile Dysfunction

Metformin And Erectile Dysfunction

There are several possible side effects of metformin; erectile dysfunction, however, does not appear to be one of them. In fact, it is possible that metformin might actually help with erectile dysfunction by getting blood sugar levels under control. An Overview of Metformin and Erectile Dysfunction Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. As with any medication, metformin has possible side effects. In clinical studies prior to the approval of metformin, erectile dysfunction was not reported as a metformin side effect. Actually, it is possible that taking metformin may help to improve erectile dysfunction associated with diabetes (known as diabetic impotence). This is because metformin helps to control blood sugar, which may help with diabetic impotence. Erectile dysfunction (also known as ED or impotence) is usually defined as a total inability to achieve an erection, an inconsistent ability to do so, or a tendency to sustain only brief erections. Ultimately, erectile dysfunction is the repeated inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. Understanding Clinical Trials Before medicines are approved, they must go through several clinical studies where thousands of people are given a particular medicine and are then compared to a group of people not given the medicine. In these studies, the side effects are always documented. As a result, it is possible to see what side effects occur, how often they appear, and how they compare to the group not taking the medicine. Sexual side effects, such as a decrease in sex drive (libido) or erectile dysfunction, were not reported as a common side effect in these studies. These studies did not include information on rare side effects (occurring in less than 1 perc Continue reading >>

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes: Take Control Today

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes: Take Control Today

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem for men who have diabetes — but it's not inevitable. Consider prevention strategies, treatment options and more. Erectile dysfunction — the inability to get or maintain an erection firm enough for sex — is common in men who have diabetes. It can stem from problems caused by poor long-term blood sugar control, which damages nerves and blood vessels. Erectile dysfunction can also be linked to other conditions common in men with diabetes, such as high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. Having erectile dysfunction can be a real challenge. It can leave you and your partner feeling frustrated and discouraged. Take steps to cope with erectile dysfunction — and get your sex life back on track. Talk to an expert Many men are reluctant to discuss erectile dysfunction with their doctors. But don't let embarrassment keep you from getting help. One small conversation can make a big difference. Here's what to do: Tell your doctor what's going on. Your doctor will consider underlying causes of your erectile dysfunction and can give you information about medication and other erectile dysfunction treatments. Find out your options. Ask what you need to do to control diabetes. Careful blood sugar control can prevent nerve and blood vessel damage that can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ask your doctor if you're taking the right steps to manage your diabetes. Ask about other health problems. It's common for men with diabetes to have other chronic conditions that can cause or worsen erectile dysfunction. Work with your doctor to make sure you're addressing any other health problems. Check your medications. Ask your doctor if you're taking any medications that might be worsening your erectile problems, such as drugs used to treat depres Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

Diabetes can affect sexual function, and as uncomfortable as it may sound, you may need to discuss this with your doctor (and certainly with your partner). To help you out, I have done research to bring you information about this most sensitive of subjects. First of all, having any chronic disease may in itself cause anxiety, which can result in sexual dysfunction. But having said that, it is also true that diabetics do report more sexual dysfunction than the populations at large. In his book Talking About Sex (American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1995), Derek C. Polonsky, MD states that 20% of people with diabetes, both men and women, report sexual dysfunction. Please read the following with an open mind, not looking for something bad which will happen to you or a loved one. Rather use it as a tool to make you better informed, and more able to talk to the professionals in your life who can help when you need it. As Dr. Polonsky says, "What starts out as a physical problem is compounded by the emotional reaction to it." This article is shared to help all of us deal with the physical before this occurs. Research on Diabetes and Sexual Dysfunction There is more research on sexual dysfunction in males than females. In males, current research points to the need to develop a comprehensive biopsychosocial evaluation and treatment of diabetic patients with sexual dysfunction because of the high incidence of major depression and anxiety disorders noted in impotent men with neuropathy as compared to those who did not have depression, anxiety, or impotence, but had neuropathy. One caveat here is that just learning to cope with a chronic disease may cause psychiatric problems which may lead to lack of compliance, and may snowball into chronic complications, and so the process feeds o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Pills Costing Just 2p Each Could Give Men's Love Lives A Lift

Diabetes Pills Costing Just 2p Each Could Give Men's Love Lives A Lift

Tablets costing just 2p each could be a new treatment for men with erection problems. New research suggests the medicine, called metformin, could boost a man's performance in the bedroom. The drug has been widely used on the NHS for many years to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. But now scientists think it may also work as an alternative to anti-impotence drugs such as Viagra or Cialis. Laboratory tests at the Georgia Health Sciences University in the U.S. show the diabetes drug boosts erectile function by relaxing blood vessels in the genital area, allowing blood to flow more freely into the penis. Although it has yet to be tested in humans, it could quickly emerge as a new treatment because it is readily available, extremely cheap and has an excellent safety record. One in ten men in the UK suffers erectile dysfunction at some point in their lives. Although drugs such as Viagra, Cialis and Levitra have revolutionised treatment in the last ten years, around 30 per cent of men who take them experience no improvement. For these men, the only other options are to inject drugs straight into the penis, or use a pump that manually increases blood supply to the organ. Neither is very popular. Metformin has been attracting a great deal of attention from researchers in recent years, mostly because it seems to hold promise as a potentially powerful new weapon against certain cancers, such as prostate, breast and ovarian tumours. The drug belongs to a class of medicines known as biguanides, which have been used for decades to treat type 2 diabetes - the form of the disease that normally affects obese people and those over 40. Taken twice a day, it works by reducing the amount of glucose produced by the liver and helping cells mop up sugar that is circulating in the bloodstrea Continue reading >>

Resolving Erectile Dysfunction

Resolving Erectile Dysfunction

Dear David and Aisha, I am a 39-year-old married man who has had type 1 diabetes for 22 years. My A1C levels run around 7.5%. About six years ago, I started having trouble with erections. Now they are very rare, even with ED pills. I know you say that there is more to sex than intercourse, and my wife and I still enjoy ourselves however we can. But we both miss the erections. I have heard lately that erectile dysfunction can sometimes be improved. How can that happen? I don’t want any surgeries. What do you know about recovering erections? Happily Married but Frustrated Dear Happily Married, You picked a good time to write. Recent research has pointed to at least three ways that erectile dysfunction (ED) can be not only treated, but often resolved. Normalizing blood sugars can help; so can losing weight. There are also programs of “penis rehabilitation” that will improve erections. Glucose Levels First, what causes erectile dysfunction in diabetes? There are many causes, but the main one is nerve and blood vessel damage caused by high blood sugar. Elevated sugar levels contribute to inflammation, which can damage or kill nerves and narrow or block blood vessels, causing them to leak. Either factor can block erections. Fortunately, we now know that lowering blood sugar allows nerves, and sometimes blood vessels, to heal and regenerate. Just as neuropathic pain in the feet often resolves as blood sugars improve, nerve function to the genitals can too. Studies in the US, Egypt, and Italy consistently show that A1C levels are the strongest predictor of erection problems. The higher a person’s A1C, the more sexual problems he is likely to have. Your level of 7.5% is a bit high. If you could get closer to 6.5%, your sex life might improve significantly. Talk with your Continue reading >>

Endo: Metformin May Help Improve Erectile Function

Endo: Metformin May Help Improve Erectile Function

ENDO: Metformin May Help Improve Erectile Function by Charles Bankhead Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Explain to patients that the diabetes drug improved erectile function in men who had not improved with sildenafil. The study involved a small number of patients. Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. WASHINGTON, June 16 -- Insulin-resistant men had significant improvement in erectile function when metformin was added to sildenafil (Viagra), according to data from a small clinical study. Sildenafil alone had failed to improve erectile function, and men who received a placebo in addition to the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitor continued to have erectile problems, Pablo Knoblovits, M.D., of Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in Argentina, reported here at the Endocrine Society meeting. "We think metformin potentiates the activity of sildenafil by improving insulin resistance and nitric oxide activity in the vascular endothelium of the penis," Dr. Knoblovits said in an interview. Erectile function depends in large part on the release of nitric oxide by the vascular endothelium. Sildenafil and other PDE5 inhibitors improve erectile function by inhibiting the breakdown to nitric oxide, Dr. Knoblovits noted. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes all interfere with nitric oxide-mediated endothelial function. The three conditions are characterized by insulin resistance, which can interfere with PDE5 inhibitors' ability to prolong the effects of nitric oxide on penile vascular endothelium, Dr. Knoblovits continued. In animal models of erectile dysfunction, the diabetes drug metformin improved erectil Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Endothelial Health And Erectile Dysfunction

Effects Of Metformin On Endothelial Health And Erectile Dysfunction

Go to: Introduction Approximately 18 million American men are impacted by erectile dysfunction (ED) (1). ED may be attributed to several etiologies, including arteriogenic, psychogenic, neurogenic, hormonal, drug-induced, and systemic disease or aging related factors (2). Specific to arteriogenic ED, three major mechanisms have been identified: (I) Endothelium-dependent vasodilatory impairment, mediated by reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO); (II) Sympathetic nerve activity elevation, resulting in enhanced basal and myogenic tone within the corpus cavernosum; (III) Atherosclerotic luminal narrowing, yielding reduced penile arterial inflow (3). Men with ED often share comorbid cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension, which in turn have common underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms including insulin resistance and inflammation, outlined in Figure 1 (4). Insulin resistance drives ED though complex mechanisms involving endothelial dysfunction, impaired vasodilatation, increased sympathetic tone, inflammation, and atherosclerosis (5-7). In this review we evaluate the hypothesis that metformin, an insulin sensitizer, modifies vascular physiology and thus impacts erectile function. First, we analyze the role of metformin in facilitating endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, regulating sympathetic nerve activity, and reducing hypertension, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Second, we review the current literature assessing the direct clinical relationship between metformin use and erectile function. Finally, we discuss the future potential use of metformin to address ED in the clinical setting. Continue reading >>

Don’t Ignore Erectile Dysfuntion: It’s Treatable!

Don’t Ignore Erectile Dysfuntion: It’s Treatable!

If you are a man with diabetes, we’ve got good news and bad news about your sex life. The bad news: Men with diabetes are three times more likely to report having problems with sex than non-diabetic men. The most common sexual problem is Erectile Dysfunction, or ED, sometimes called impotence. Even worse, because ED is such a private issue, many men feel embarrassed to discuss the problem with their doctor, or even their partner, so the problem is never addressed. The good news: ED is one of the most treatable complications of diabetes. In fact, over 95 percent of cases can be successfully treated. With proven treatments available, diabetic men with ED have options. It isn’t something you—or your partner—should have to live with. What ED Is—and What It Isn’t ED means the repeated inability to achieve or sustain an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse. Although sexual vigor generally declines with age, a man who is healthy, physically and emotionally, should be able to produce erections, and enjoy sexual intercourse, regardless of his age. ED is not an inevitable part of the aging process. ED does not mean: • An occasional failure to achieve an erection. The adage is true: It really does happen to everyone. All men experience occasional difficulties with erection, usually related to fatigue, illness, alcohol or drug use, or stress. It isn’t fun, but it is totally normal. • Diminished interest in sex. ED occurs when a man is interested in sex, but still cannot achieve or maintain an erection. Many men with diabetes also experience a decreased sex drive, often as a result of hormone imbalances or depression. Decreased sex drive is quite treatable, but it is treated differently from ED. • Problems with ejaculation. Such problems often indicate a st Continue reading >>

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes

It is estimated that about 35% to 75% of men with diabetes will experience at least some degree of erectile dysfunction -- also called ED or impotence -- during their lifetime. Men with diabetes tend to develop erectile dysfunction 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. As men with diabetes age, erectile dysfunction becomes even more common. Above the age of 50, the likelihood of having difficulty with an erection occurs in approximately 50% to 60% of men with diabetes. Above age 70, there is about a 95% likelihood of having some difficulty with erectile dysfunction. The causes of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes are complex and involve impairments in nerve, blood vessel, and muscle function. To get an erection, men need healthy blood vessels, nerves, male hormones, and a desire to be sexually stimulated. Diabetes can damage the blood vessels and nerves that control erection. Therefore, even if you have normal amounts of male hormones and you have the desire to have sex, you still may not be able to achieve a firm erection. Men with diabetes having trouble with achieving and/or maintaining an erection can take oral medications like sildenafil (Revatio, Viagra), tadalafil (Adcirca,Cialis), avanafil (Stendra), or vardenafil (Levitra, Staxyn). However, because people with diabetes also tend to have problems with their heart, these medications may not be appropriate and could cause dangerous interactions with some heart medicines. Talk to your doctor to determine what treatment is best. Additional treatments men with diabetes might want to consider include intracavernous injection therapy, vacuum erection (not constriction) devices, venous constriction devices (for venous leak syndrome), intraurethral therapy, penile prostheses (inflatable and malleable) Continue reading >>

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