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Metformin High Bp

Fda-approved High Blood Pressure Drug Extends Life Span In Roundworms

Fda-approved High Blood Pressure Drug Extends Life Span In Roundworms

An FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers find that an FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. The drug, hydralazine, extended life span about 25 percent in two strains of C. elegans (roundworms), one a wild type and the other bred to generate high levels of a neurotoxic protein called tau that in humans is associated with Alzheimer's disease. "This is the first report of hydralazine treatment activating the NRF2/SKN-1 signaling pathway. We found the drug extends the life span of worms as well as or better than other potential anti-aging compounds such as curcumin and metformin. The treatment also appeared to maintain their health as measured by tests of flexibility and wiggling speed," said Dr. Hamid Mirzaei, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study, published today in Nature Communications. The NRF2 pathway protects human cells from oxidative stress. The body's ability to protect itself against damaging oxygen free radicals diminishes with age, he said. One of the hallmarks of aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is oxidative stress, which is believed to result cumulatively from inflammatory and infectious illnesses throughout life, Dr. Mirzaei explained. SKN-1, a C. elegans transcription factor, corresponds to NRF2 in humans. Both play a pivotal role in their respective species' responses to oxidative stress and life span, he said. The UT Southwestern researchers were searching for a chemical probe they could use in experiments to id Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Decrease Blood Pressure In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Intensively Treated With Insulin?

Does Metformin Decrease Blood Pressure In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Intensively Treated With Insulin?

Abstract AIMS: We investigated in a double-blind study whether metformin reduces blood pressure (BP) in patients with Type 2 diabetes intensively treated with insulin. METHODS: A total of 220 patients with Type 2 diabetes were asked to undergo 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (24-h ABPM). One hundred and eighty-two gave informed consent. Eighty-nine were randomized to metformin and 93 to placebo. Thirty-five subjects dropped out (13 placebo, 22 metformin users); 147 patients underwent a second 24-h ABPM, 16 weeks after randomization. RESULTS: Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), pulse BP (PP), mean BP (MP) and heart rate (HR) were measured as office BP measurements and as 24-h ABPM for 24-h, day and night. Office BP measurements did not differ significantly between the placebo- and metformin-treated groups for any BP measure, but showed a non-significant trend for SBP reduction with metformin use (mean baseline-adjusted difference, metformin minus placebo: -4.2 mmHg, 95% CI, -9.9 to +1.5; P = 0.15). The baseline-adjusted differences of the ambulatory measurements were -0.2 mmHg (95% CI, -2.9 to +2.6) for the 24-h SBP, and +1.1 mmHg (95% CI, -0.7 to +2.8) for the 24-h DBP. On the whole, BP differences between metformin- and placebo-treated groups were not statistically significant. The only significant difference was for night-time PP (baseline-adjusted difference: -2.2 mmHg; 95% CI, -4.2 to -0.2). These results were not different after adjustment for age and diabetes duration, or for (changes in) body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, insulin dose or plasma homocysteine. CONCLUSION: Metformin does not significantly affect BP in patients with Type 2 diabetes intensively treated with insulin. Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin And Metformin (oral Route)

Canagliflozin And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. It is very important to follow carefully any instructions from your doctor about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your doctor. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would normally. Make allowances for changing time zones and keep your meal times as close as possible to your usual meal times. In case of emergency—There may be a time when you need emergency help for a problem caused by your diabetes. You need to be prepared for these emergencies. It is a good idea to wear a medical identification (ID) bracelet or neck chain at all times. Also, carry an ID card in your wallet or purse that says that you have diabetes and a list of all of your medicines. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause a Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-250 mg-MYL round, white, imprinted with G31, M What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin? Do not use glipizide and metformin if you have congestive heart failure or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is glipizide and metformin? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthca Continue reading >>

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Talk around blood pressure typically centers on what to do if blood pressure is too high. We know that high blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes than people without diabetes. We also know that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and kidney disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood pressure goal of less than 140/80 for most people with diabetes. But what if your blood pressure is too low? Is it cause for concern? And what do you do about it? Low blood pressure defined Low blood pressure is also known as “hypotension.” You might be thinking that low blood pressure is a good thing, especially if yours tends to run on the high side. But the reality is that low blood pressure can be a serious condition for some people. For people without diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure of less than 120 over 80 (written as 120/80). Low blood pressure is generally defined as a blood pressure of less than 90/60. If your blood pressure tends to hover in that area without any symptoms, then there’s likely no cause for concern. But if symptoms occur, that’s a signal that something is amiss. Symptoms of low blood pressure Low blood pressure may be a sign that there’s an underlying medical condition, especially if your blood pressure drops suddenly or if you have the following symptoms: • Dizziness or lightheadedness • Fainting • Fast or irregular heartbeat • Feeling weak • Feeling confused • Lack of concentration • Blurred vision • Cold, clammy skin • Nausea • Rapid, shallow breathing • Depression • Dehydration That’s quite a list. Some of the above symptoms can occur if you have, say, the flu, a stomach bug, or have been outside for a long time in h Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Metformin On Blood Pressure And Metabolism In Nondiabetic Hypertensive Patients.

The Effect Of Metformin On Blood Pressure And Metabolism In Nondiabetic Hypertensive Patients.

Abstract OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of metformin on blood pressure and metabolism in nondiabetic hypertensives. DESIGN: A six-week single-blind placebo wash-out, followed by a double-blind placebo-controlled parallel group design with skew randomization (2:2:1) to metformin 850 mg b.i.d. (n = 10), metformin 500 mg b.i.d. (n = 10), or placebo b.i.d. (n = 5) for 12 weeks. Office blood pressure (oBP), ambulatory blood pressure (aBP), lipoproteins, and oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) were measured/performed before and during treatment. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male and nine female nondiabetic (OGTT) patients (median age 57 (39-74) years) with verified hypertension (White-coat excluded) for 4 (0-20) years. RESULTS: The possible effect of metformin treatment and dosage was tested with a two-factor analysis of variance. Treatment induced a significant decline in diastolic oBP, P < 0.05. This decline was, however, not significantly different comparing metformin and placebo. Systolic oBP, diastolic aBP, and systolic aBP showed no significant change by treatment. The decline in diastolic oBP was 5 mmHg in the pooled group of metformin-treated patients, P < 0.005. Different gender and the presence of obesity had no impact on the decline in diastolic oBP within this group. Changes in fasting C-peptide and fasting insulin during treatment were unrelated to blood pressure changes. High fasting insulin (> 60 pmol L[-1]) or high fasting C-peptide (> 1000 pmol L[-1]) at baseline did not favour an effect of metformin on diastolic oBP. Glucose metabolism and lipoproteins were unchanged in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although metformin treatment induced a decline in diastolic office blood pressure in nondiabetic hypertensives, the decline was not different from that during placebo treatment. Metf Continue reading >>

Metformin, High Blood Pressure ,underactive Thyroid.

Metformin, High Blood Pressure ,underactive Thyroid.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Metformin, High Blood Pressure ,Underactive thyroid. I take thyroxine for an underactive thyroid. I was diagnosed diabetes type 2 just over a year ago but just borderline as first test 50 second test 48. I was not given medication although metformin has been mentioned. I found this forum and have taken the advice to low carb and have lost just over 2 stone amazing given i had never managed before. I still have several more stones to lose but i have stalled for a little while now. Last check with DN blood pressure was up my main concern is if i am expected to take Metformin and or another tablet for blood pressure that i make a wise choice. Thanks to this forum i know to ask for Metformin SR. I did not see the GP when diagnosed have managed by seeing DN changed my diet. My thyroid is reasonable at the moment but obviously does not help me to lose weight my main concern is not to over mix any medication not totally sure what the GP will suggest just wondered if anyone had same problems and had found a way Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Many people with type 2 diabetes are prescribed tablets to help control their blood glucose levels. Metformin is the first-line medication for diabetes in the UK but there are many more types of medication for type 2 diabetes discussed below. Most people had tried initially to control their blood glucose with a regimen of diet and exercise before being given oral medication. Many people took metformin alone to control blood glucose, and some were taking metformin and gliclazide. Both medications help to reduce blood glucose but work differently. Metformin reduces the amount of glucose produced in the liver, and also makes muscle tissue absorb more glucose; gliclazide increases the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas. While people found that the medication they took had helped reduce and control their blood glucose, many had experienced side effects. Metformin can cause diarrhoea and other digestive problems and many people went back to their GPs for advice. Some people felt concerned about the risks they might face from certain drugs after reading negative reports in the media (see 'Misunderstandings about diabetes'). Rosiglitazone has been linked to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Since these interviews were conducted in 2008, there has been growing concern about the potential harmful effects of rosiglitazone (Avandia, but also contained in Avandamet and Avaglim) and from September 2010 in the UK and Europe, new prescribing of this drug has stopped, and most people who were taking the drug have been changed to alternative medication. Most people we interviewed had been prescribed higher dosages of medication to control their blood glucose as their diabetes got worse over time. Some people had transferred to insulin while continuing on metformin (se Continue reading >>

A1c Change Vs. Sitagliptin + Metformin | Invokamet Xr (canagliflozin/metformin Hcl Extended-release)

A1c Change Vs. Sitagliptin + Metformin | Invokamet Xr (canagliflozin/metformin Hcl Extended-release)

Dual therapy vs placebo + metformin at 26 weeks and vs sitagliptin + metformin at 52 weeks (Lavalle-Gonzlez et al) Adouble-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study of 1284 patients who were inadequately controlled on metformin alone. Study consisted of a 2-week, single-blind, placebo run-in period, a 26-week, placebo- and active-controlled treatment period (period 1) followed by a 26-week, active-controlled treatment period (period 2). Patients were randomized to the addition of canagliflozin 100 mg, canagliflozin 300 mg, sitagliptin 100 mg, or placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in A1C from baseline through week 26; change in A1C from baseline through week 52 was a prespecified secondary endpoint.1 Reference: 1. Lavalle-Gonzlez FJ, Januszewicz A, Davidson J, et al. Efficacy and safety of canagliflozin compared with placebo and sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes on background metformin monotherapy: a randomised trial. Diabetologia. 2013;56:2582-2592. Supplemental tables available at: Accessed May 16, 2018. INVOKANA (canagliflozin) is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. INVOKANA is not recommended in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. INVOKAMET and INVOKAMET XR are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both canagliflozin and metformin is appropriate. INVOKAMET and INVOKAMET XR are not recommended in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION for INVOKANA, INVOKAMET (canagliflozin/metformin HCl), and INVOKAMET XR WARNING: LACTIC ACIDOSIS AND LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION Postmarketing Continue reading >>

Are There Any Interactions With Medications?

Are There Any Interactions With Medications?

Black Seed Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Black seed might lower blood sugar in some people. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking black seed along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed. br/> Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others. Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants) Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Black seed might increase the immune system. By increasing the immune system, black seed might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system. Some medications that decrease the immune system include include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others. Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Black seed might slow blood clotting. Taking black seed along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), nonsteroidal anti-inflammato Continue reading >>

Metformin And Blood Pressure Increased - From Fda Reports

Metformin And Blood Pressure Increased - From Fda Reports

Blood pressure increased is found among people who take Metformin, especially for people who are female, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for < 1 month, also take medication Aspirin, and have High blood cholesterol. This review analyzes which people have Blood pressure increased with Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 199,020 people who have side effects when taking Metformin from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Metformin and have Blood pressure increased, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Metformin and have Blood pressure increased Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 27.87 % 1 - 6 months: 14.21 % 6 - 12 months: 10.93 % 1 - 2 years: 7.65 % 2 - 5 years: 19.67 % 5 - 10 years: 15.3 % 10+ years: 4.37 % Gender of people who have Blood pressure increased when taking Metformin *: female: 60.77 % male: 39.23 % Age of people who have Blood pressure increased when taking Metformin *: 0-1: 0.06 % 2-9: 0.06 % 10-19: 0.47 % 20-29: 1.28 % 30-39: 5.24 % 40-49: 11.78 % 50-59: 25.58 % 60+: 55.53 % Top conditions involved for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol (753 people, 12.13%) Depression (378 people, 6.09%) Rheumatoid Arthritis (327 people, 5.27%) Pain (289 people, 4.66%) Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (223 people, 3.59%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Aspirin (734 people, 11.82%) Lisinopril (720 people, 11.60%) Simvastatin (558 people, 8.99%) Lipitor (551 people, 8.88%) Lantus (450 people, 7.25%) Top othe Continue reading >>

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