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Metformin Heat Rash

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Metformin Allergy

Metformin Allergy

Go to: Discussion Metformin is a commonly used antidiabetic drug.[3] The drug is considered to be safe and effective. It is particularly indicated for use in obese patients, with a metabolic syndrome[4,5] It is usually considered as a safe drug. The most common adverse effect of metformin is gastrointestinal irritation.[6] It rarely causes hypoglycemia, if it is used as a single antidiabetic drug. Nevertheless, an overdose of metformin can cause lactic acidosis. Thus, metformin is contraindicated in diabetic patients with kidney diseases and other conditions that might increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Similar to other drugs, allergy to metformin may occur. Metformin allergy is extremely rare. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis and psoriasiform drug eruption are the two most common presentations of metformin allergy.[7–9] In quoted reports,[7–9] the patients usually develop a rash within a few days of metformin administration and the skin lesions disappear after stopping the drug. In addition, resolution of skin manifestations in metformin allergy, within several days after withdrawal of the drug, and their recurrence when the drug is reintroduced is also seen.[9] As the patient had refused biopsy and other tests, this case was diagnosed as a probable case of metformin allergy. Based on the Naranjo probability assessment scale, the adverse effects were probably due to metformin. The clinical presentation of metformin allergy can occur in several forms. The mucocutaneous manifestation is the most common. In addition to leukocytoclastic vasculitis and psoriatic drug eruption, lichenoid reaction of the oral mucosa may also occur. Lamey et al. have proposed that the Grinspan's syndrome (the triad of oral lichen planus, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension) could be seen in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Not At Goal On Metformin?

Not At Goal On Metformin?

Ask your doctor about fighting type 2 diabetes harder by adding the pill that starts with “f” If you’re not reaching your A1C goal on metformin, you should know that adding once-daily FARXIGA to metformin therapy helped some patients lower their A1C more than metformin alone. The results of a clinical trial showed that patients taking FARXIGA 5 mg added on to metformin had an A1C reduction of 0.7 versus 0.3 with metformin alone. Although not a weight loss or blood pressure drug, FARXIGA may also provide weight loss and blood pressure benefits when taken with metformin. The results of a clinical trial showed that patients taking FARXIGA added on to metformin to lower their A1C also lost an average of 6.6 pounds, versus 2 pounds with metformin alone at 12 weeks. And results from the same study showed that taking FARXIGA added on to metformin also helped to lower systolic blood pressure. Remember, only your doctor can tell you if adding FARXIGA to your current metformin therapy could make a difference for you. Individual results may vary. Do not take FARXIGA if you have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA. FARXIGA may cause serious side effects including: Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems FARXIGA has been tested in 24 clinical studies that looked at its benefits and s Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

Metformin Hcl Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

Alogliptin-metformin Side Effects

Alogliptin-metformin Side Effects

Alogliptin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Alogliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Alogliptin and metformin is a combination medicine used with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Alogliptin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to alogliptin or metformin, or if you have: severe kidney disease; or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Some people taking alogliptin and metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if you are dehydrated, or if you drink large amounts of alcohol. Talk with your doctor about your risk. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: kidney disease; heart disease; liver disease; a history of pancreatitis; gallstones; a history of alcoholism; or if you are over 80 years old and have not recently had your kidney fun Continue reading >>

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Tradjenta include cough, weight gain, muscle or joint pain, headache, low blood sugar. Tradjenta may cause serious side effects, including: inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis, symptoms include severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), fever, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. The recommended dose of Tradjenta is 5 mg once daily. Tradjenta may interact with bosentan, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, quinidine, verapamil, rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine, St. John's wort, phenobarbital and other barbiturates, medication to treat HIV or AIDS, medicines to treat narcolepsy, medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, seizure medications, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol), sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or other oral diabetes medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Tradjenta; it is not expected to harm an unborn baby. It is unknown if Tradjenta passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin And Heat Rash

Metformin And Heat Rash

21 discussions around the web mention both Metformin (brand name: Glucophage, Glumetza) is a medication used primarily for diabetes. It is an oral hypoglycemic medication. It lowers blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics by facilitating the entrance of glucose in the tissues and reducing the amount made by the liver. It also helps delay the development of many complications linked to diabetes. It can also be used for other conditions such as weight loss and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Are you (or someone you care for) currently taking this drug? Clomid vs. Metformin Provera vs. Metformin Glucophage vs. Metformin Femara vs. Metformin Byetta vs. Metformin Heat Rash and Rash Metformin and PCOS Heat Rash and Itching Metformin and Diabetes Heat Rash and Allergy Metformin and Clomid Heat Rash and Pain Metformin and Weight Loss Heat Rash and Acne Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

People with diabetes probably know about Metformin and its side effects. This article is for all those who wish to learn more about this drug. Metformin is a medication used in diabetes (especially type 2 diabetes) treatment, (including patients who are overweight). It is used in treating polycystic ovaries syndrome as well. According to some sources, it is one of the world’s most prescribed anti-diabetic medications. Although it is considered quite safe, it can cause some side effects. Metformin side effects are not very severe, but some people are too sensitive and can have bad reaction to this medication. Possible Metformin Side Effects Metformin does not cause many side effects, in condition it is used in appropriate cases and in recommended doses. This medication helps reducing triglycerides and can contribute to preventing cardiovascular problems in people who suffer from diabetes. Contraindications are possible in patients who suffer from any problem related to lactic acidosis. There can be kidney problems and liver or lung problems. Patients with hypothyroidism should be extra careful with this drug and must consult their doctor first. Metformin side effects that can sometimes occur are: headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, flatulence and other gastrointestinal problems. Some users may experience weight gain. Allergies to this drug are also possible, so if you experience any sort of allergic reaction (rash, difficult breathing, pain in your chest, mouth swelling, lip swelling, face or tongue swelling) call your doctor immediately. These are signs of allergic reactions, so if you experience any of these, you will have to get immediate medical help. Even if you have never had any kind of allergy, you never know what can happen. Skin rash is us Continue reading >>

Will You Have Heat Rash With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Heat Rash With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 52 year old man who takes Rapatha NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Glucophage

Glucophage

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Glucophage. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist. All medicines have benefits and risks. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Glucophage against the benefits expected for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. What Glucophage is used for Glucophage is used to control blood glucose (the amount of sugar in the blood) in people with diabetes mellitus. type 1 diabetes, also called insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile onset diabetes, when insulin alone is not enough to control blood glucose levels type 2 diabetes, also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity onset diabetes. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) Glucophage can be used alone, or in combination with other medicines for treating diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Glucophage has been prescribed for you. Glucophage is not recommended for use in children, except for those with insulin-resistant diabetes who are being treated in hospital. Glucophage is available only with a doctor's prescription. How Glucophage works Glucophage belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides. Glucophage lowers high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia) by helping your body make better use of the insulin produced by your pancreas. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to make enough insulin or their body does not respond properly to th Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

Prickly Skin | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Prickly Skin | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Im relatively new to this and my first time posting Ive been reading the forums and not seen anything im concerned about Im T2 diabetic and as far as I can remember its only since I have started the medication of metformin aspirin and simvastatin that I believe I have had any kind of simptoms I think I say I think because I dont know and have been told that I wont have any simpoms as such by my doctor. When Im feeling hungry or am late for a meal I get the feeling of hundreds of needles prickling under my skin all over my body most of the time I can handle this pretty much ok but sometimes I also feel very warm at the same time and this just enhanses the prickly feeling I also start to shake. When the prickling start bad I have to rub or scratch my skin as its very irratable and feel like I have to stop it . is this anything to do with diabtese ? Im really in a quandry with this We cannot diagnose but we might be able to help you better if we know a little more about you. Do you know what your Bg levels are throughout the day and in particular when you feel this way ? There are many things it might be and not all are Diabetes related. There are many side effects of drugs which can also be responsible for various things. Have you discussed this fully with your GP as it is not strictly true to say you won't be bothered by any side effects. Everybody is different and drugs can react differently in each individual. ? my BG level seems to average around 10 and the prickly sking usually start when I havent eaten anything ie missed ir late for a meal . I fully intend to inform my gp on my next visit about all the things that Ive listed My gp also gave me ano Continue reading >>

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