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Metformin Headache Pcos

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

Day 3 Metformin And Awful Side Effects

Day 3 Metformin And Awful Side Effects

hi all im on day 3 of the metformin and i feel awful i am nauseous feel dizzy and have a major headache is this normal? i have pcos so dr thought it might help me to lose weight and start ovulating again has anyone had any success I was on metformin for a couple of months. I couldn't eat and I lost a huge amount of weight, I would just cry at the dinner table cause i felt so ill. I'm on Metformin, have worked my way up to 2000mg a day. At first the side effects were terrible and I gave up on them more than once. However, I stuck it out this time and have been on them for 8mths or so. They are really helping with the weight loss and that in turn is helping with ov I think! It's worth seeing if you can stick it out and how you get on with them once the side effects pass or ease (hopefully they do) xx I'm also on Metformin after being diagnosed with PCOS back in May. Currently on 1700mg a day. I felt very queasy and had headaches and upset stomach for the first couple of weeks but now I have no trouble. It definitely helps when taking them after food, because a couple of times i took them when i was out, with no food and felt awful an hour later. We had a scan about three weeks ago to check the baby was ok but at the same time he checked my ovaries and there was a definite improvement and a lot less cysts. I'm coming off it in 3 weeks though because of the baby... If the Doc has suggested it, i would give it a couple of weeks and see what happens thanks at least im not the only one i have felt so rotten all day and was at the gym this morning and thought i was dying lol. im gonna hold out for a bit and see if it eases off as its worked for others and hopefully between these and going to the gym daily i may lose the weight and return everything to normal fingers crosed for Continue reading >>

Pcos Prescribed Metformin And Headaches

Pcos Prescribed Metformin And Headaches

Started by ClarkeTribe, May 13 2017 09:44 PM Just wondering if anyone has any insight as to whether it is normal to have headaches whilst starting / adjusting to taking metformin for PCOS related insulin resistance and elevated T levels? In my first week, just on 500mg and getting headaches every night. Edited by ClarkeTribe, 13 May 2017 - 09:45 PM. I didn't get headaches but it played with my stomach. Had diarrhoea (sorry tmi) until I got used to it. Think it was about a week. Then had to take a second tablet per day and get used to that!! Yes I can't recall headaches - but I too had an upset tummy. That settled after around two weeks. Yes it's normal. I remember headaches and extreme tiredness - feeling like a zombie all day. I got the gastrointestinal upset too. Stick with it though - the side effects do go away. Increasing the dose slowly as per your doctors orders helps too. It really is a great medication for PCOS. For now make sure you are drinking plenty of water and rest when you can Yes I had the upset stomach fatigue and headaches, I stuck with it for about a month before I started to experience a depression type state my FS changed me to the slow release metformin which is diabex XR and the symptoms went away straight away! hope it settles down for you soon xx Continue reading >>

Metformin Causin A Headache? : Pcos Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Metformin Causin A Headache? : Pcos Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

since takin metformin 12 days ago i have been getin headaches every now and again and im told its because metformin lowers the sugar in the blood makin u feel weaker and causin headaches, so im meant to be eatin something sweet like a diabetic would? cause im not sure how much is standard to eat to make the headache go, i want to lose weight not put it on eatin choc so wat is advisable? I, too, got headaches when I first started taking metformin. I NEVER got headaches before, so it was annoying to say the least! I found that eating regularly.. every 3-4 hours, with regular meals and healthy snacks in between, kept the blood sugar from dropping too low. You don't want to eat something super-sugary like a diabetic would.. that just sets you up for another crash. Try a piece of fruit or some whole grain bread with a tablespoon of natural peanut butter.. hope that helps! What about orange juices or things like that? Would they help with the headaches, since I suffer with them at the moment too! I've had headaches since I've started taking it too. I started three days ago. I feel good today, but the headaches still want to creep in. I read on another forum that they'd eat something to raise their sugar. I didn't even think about that being the issue. Makes sense though! yeh but thats mainly for if ur diabetic if ur takin metformin for pcos my doc sed best to hav a bit of bread to get rid of it if its due to the med cz it kicks in quiker then sugar i too have had headaches from metformin. and stomach problems and all of the side effects. the doctors said that it could take up to a month for the side effects to go away...and it has been a year. two months ago i ended up in the hospital because of my head. so i quit all my medicines. i have lost 6 pounds, my stomach doesnt bot Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Metformin And Unusual/usual Side Effects?

Metformin And Unusual/usual Side Effects?

Metformin and unusual/usual side effects? Metformin and unusual/usual side effects? I just started 500mg of ER metformin on Tuesday. I just got off the phone with the pharmacist, because my doc's office is closed this afternoon. Nausea is minimal, thankfully, but what I am experiencing is bad headaches and by about lunchtime (I take mine with breakfast), I feel like I could just sleep the rest of the day. I can barely keep my eyes open. Normal? Will it go away? Abnormal reaction and cause for concern? * oh, duh. Pharmacist said he'd never heard of these side effects. I'm on 500mg ER as well (approximately 3 months duration), and the only side effect I've noticed (and I'm not even sure if this is due to the Metformin or not) is tiredness after a carb-heavy meal. I usually take it in the afternoon/evening so if I do happen to eat carby, it's closer to bedtime anyway! What are you eating for breakfast? Maybe the food you're eating, or the amount, isn't enough to help prevent the headaches/nausea. Unless you absolutely must take it with breakfast (mine says take on full stomach), perhaps try taking it with lunch or dinner to see if having more in your stomach helps? I'm not a doctor or pharmacist or anyone like that, so take the advice with a grain of salt thanks, Penmage- I typically do pretty well with breakfast- eggs, turkey sausage, cheese, and kale or spinach scrambled together...or peanut butter and celery and a handful of almonds. Although I've gotten in the bad habit of having a cup of coffee with creamer and sugar and need to knock that off. Lunch this week has been more carb heavy, as has dinner. Headache leaves me feeling diminished and then I am more likely to cave in and eat junk. So the tiredness can be because of the carbs, perhaps? I don't know which came f Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Insulin resistance is seen in the majority of women with PCOS. Doctors prescribe metformin for PCOS because it is an effective insulin sensitizer. However, the drug comes with its share of side effects. Let’s look at Metformin side effects for PCOS in detail. Metformin Side Effects For PCOS 1. Malaise Or Physical Discomfort As many as 1 in every 4 women on metformin just does not feel well. There is a feeling of fatigue even without much physical exertion. Sometimes, this fatigue is accompanied with aches that can last for a varying degree of time. While this may not sound too severe, it is one of the most common Metformin side effect for PCOS. 2. Gastrointestinal Distress Gastrointestinal problems is another common Metformin side effect for PCOS (experienced by nearly a third of women taking the drug.) These problems include abdominal pain, nausea, occasional vomiting, loose motions, irregular bowel movements or diarrhea. Bloating and flatulence can be a major source of embarrassment. Anorexia and a sharp metallic taste can play havoc with appetite, especially because eating a healthy diet at the right times is critical for PCOS patients. Heartburn and headaches add to the suffering caused by PCOS symptoms. 3. Anemia Another Metformin side effect for PCOS is a decrease in Vitamin B12 levels because the drug affects the absorption of this vitamin. Vitamin B12 is vital for red blood cell formation. When levels of vitamin B12 go down, you can suffer from anemia. Common symptoms of anemia include tiredness, lightheadedness, and dizziness. Vitamin B12 also plays an important role in many bodily processes. For example, there is evidence of a relationship between low levels of vitamin B12 and an increased risk of heart diseases. 4. Accumulation Of Homocysteine Long-term use Continue reading >>

Metformin Versus Chromium Picolinate In Clomiphene Citrate-resistant Patients With Pcos: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

Metformin Versus Chromium Picolinate In Clomiphene Citrate-resistant Patients With Pcos: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

Metformin versus chromium picolinate in clomiphene citrate-resistant patients with PCOs: A double-blind randomized clinical trial Sedigheh Amooee , M.D., Mohammad Ebrahim Parsanezhad , M.D., Maryam Ravanbod Shirazi , M.D., Saeed Alborzi , M.D., and Alamtaj Samsami , M.D. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Corresponding Author: Sedigheh Amooee, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Zand Ave., Shiraz, Iran. Email: [email protected] Tel/Fax: (+98) 9177111318 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, ( ) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: Chromium picolinate could be effective in clomiphen citrate resistant PCOS patients. Objective: To compare the effects of chromium picolinate vs. metformin in clomiphen citrate resistant PCOS patients. Materials and Methods: The present randomized clinical trial was performed on 92 women with clomiphen citrate-resistant PCOS at the clinics which were affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups receiving either chromium picolinate (200g daily) or metformin (1500mg daily) for 3 months. Anthropometric and hormonal profile were measured and compared both before and after the treatment. Ovulation and pregnancy rate was measured in the two study groups, as well. Results: Chromium picolinate significantly decreased fasting blood sugar (FBS) after 3 months of treatment (p=0.042). In the same way, the serum levels of fasting insulin had significantly decreased leading to an increase in insulin sensi Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (or Glucophage) for polycystic ovararian symdrome (PCOS) by Kelly Why would you be taking metformin or glucophage (metformin is the generic for glucophage) Metformin is a diabetes medicine used for lowering insulin and blood sugar levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This helps regulate menstrual cycles, start ovulation, and lower the risk of miscarriage in women with PCOS. It is generally used in conjuction with clomid. The most common side effects of metformin Nausea. Loss of appetite. Diarrhea. Increased abdominal gas. A metallic taste. Tiredness. Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. I’ve been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. My personal tips Always take with food or a glass of milk – I always take my Continue reading >>

Changes In Weight, Papilledema, Headache, Visual Field, And Life Status In Response To Diet And Metformin In Women With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension With And Without Concurrent Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Or Hyperinsulinemia.

Changes In Weight, Papilledema, Headache, Visual Field, And Life Status In Response To Diet And Metformin In Women With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension With And Without Concurrent Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Or Hyperinsulinemia.

Cholesterol Center, Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA. [email protected] The authors hypothesized that a metformin (MET)-diet would improve symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in women who also had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or hyperinsulinemia without PCOS. Changes in weight, papilledema, headache, visual fields, and overall life status were prospectively assessed in response to 6 to 14 months on 2.25 g/day MET-diet or diet alone in 36 women with IIH, 23 with PCOS, selected by baseline body mass index (BMI) > or = 25, and no previous surgery for IIH. Overall life status was graded using a self-reported 1-5 scale (1 = well, normal activities; 2 = unwell, usual activities; 3 = poor, usual activities; 4 = poor, no usual activities; 5 = totally disabled). Conventional treatment for IIH was maintained unchanged during MET-diet intervention. The diet was hypocaloric (1500 calories/day), high protein (26% of calories), and low carbohydrate (44%). Of the 23 women with PCOS, 20 received MET-diet and 3 diet only (could not tolerate MET). Of the 13 women without PCOS, 7 were hyperinsulinemic and received MET-diet and 6 received diet alone. The 3 treatment groups (diet only [n = 9], PCOS-MET-diet [n = 20], and hyperinsulinemia-MET-diet [n = 7]) did not differ by median entry BMI (33.3, 37.6, and 35.7 kg/m(2)) or by duration of treatment (10.2, 11.4, and 10.9 months). Median percent weight loss was greatest in the PCOS-MET group (7.7%, P = 0.0015), was 3.3% in the diet only group, and 2.4% (P = 0.04) in the hyperinsulinemia-MET group. Papilledema significantly improved in the diet-alone group from 100% at baseline to 13% (P = 0.03), and in the PCOS-MET group from 95% to 30% (P = 0.002). If headache persisted on therapy, it was less intense-l Continue reading >>

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