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Metformin Er

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise to prevent d Continue reading >>

Metformin Er And Diarrhea | Diabetic Connect

Metformin Er And Diarrhea | Diabetic Connect

Ive been on Metformin Er since dec 11th of 2016 and would have occasional diarrhea. Well ever since the day after Thanksgiving I have been having almost daily diarrhea(1-4 times a day). I have kind of gotten away from my diet lately. Any suggestions how I can control it? I have very little to no stomach issues that accompany it. Just a normal urge to go. Also on days I dont go I have what feels like a belly full of gas. I know Metformin affects people differently. Thank you so much doctor took hubby of of Metformin raised his creatine levels cant ever take again he went to insulin and glineprine 5 mg good luck It helps to eat half your meat, then take the metformin and eat the rest of your meal. Worked for me. A friend who was on it long before me told me to do that. This was a serious problem for me during my first year on Metformin. And it got worse each time I refilled my prescription because I had to adjust to a different brand. My doctor was not at all helpful. I really did not want to change medications because Metformin is the safest with many other added benefits. SoI first gained some serious control over my diet. I went as low carb as I possibly could. That lowered my A1c enough that I could reduce the amount of Metformin from 2000mg daily to 1000mg daily. That made all the difference for me. No more diarrhea! I also changed pharmacies. The one I use now doesn't change brands often and if they do, they inform me at the time I refill my prescription so I can be prepared for an adjustment period. The last time it changed, I didn't suffer diarrhea at all. I think that is because of the lower dose. If I have to increase my dosage in the future, I expect the diarrhea will return. I'm a small person and I think 2000mg is just too much. I hope this helps you because Continue reading >>

Why Not Metformin Er (extended Release)?

Why Not Metformin Er (extended Release)?

Friend "Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT)"; dx Jan. 2014 While not yet on meds, I wouldn't be surprised to find it in my future. And when it comes to oral medications, Metformin seems to be the "starter drug," so to speak. But after two years as a member of this website, I've noticed that most people on Metformin seem NOT to be on the "ER" (extended release) version, and my question is: WHY NOT? Is the ER version less effective? Is it more expensive? Because given the commonly cited intestinal side-effects of regular Metformin, opting for the ER version seems like a no-brainer to me. Any feedback would be appreciated! Thanks! D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Some have no issues with the regular, the max doses is smaller with the ER but I suppose its up to what a person needs and can handle and what a doctor wants them on. I've also read these threads, and what I see quite a lot is people who have had gastrointestinal problems for months or even years, but their doctors haven't offered them the ER/SR substitutes; so my conclusion, for what it's worth, is that busy doctors just don't think to do so unless people complain. I've even seen posts from members saying that their doctor wasn't aware of the alternative. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) I was on the regular 2550 mg for 9 years. I just started having problems. My Endo switched me to the ER, first 500, now 1000. I am sure it will need to be upped agains. If I can't stand the ER we will talk about other drugs. The ER costs me the same $1.97 per month. If you take the 1000 mg of the brand name ER it is quite expensive. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Generic Name: metformin hydrochloride Dosage Form: tablet, extended release Metformin Extended Release Tablets Description Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP are an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5· HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP contain 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg meets USP dissolution Test 3. System Components and Performance- Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP comprises a swellable matrix system. In the aqueous gastrointestinal (GI) environment, the dosage form swells remarkably thereby increasing in size and geometry from where drug is released slowly by a process of diffusion through the gel matrix that is essentially independent of pH. The hydrated polymer system is not rigid and is expected to be broken up by normal peristalsis in the GI tract. The biologically inert components of the tablet may occasionally remain intact during GI transit and will be Continue reading >>

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Brand name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage XR, Glumetza Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifest Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 500mg

Metformin Er 500mg

About this medication Metformin ER is the name of the medication. It comes in the form of a tablet, and should be taken by mouth. It belongs to a class of medications called Biguanide. Why is this medication prescribed This medication is used to treat type-2 diabetes and pre-diabetes conditions. Normally, when you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into a sugar called glucose. This is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. The body needs Insulin to be able to use this sugar for energy. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells. It can lead to serious diabetes complications. How does it work Metformin belongs to a group of medications called Biguanides. They work by decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver and increasing the amount of sugar absorbed by muscle cells. As a result you get more sugar in the cells and less is in the blood. How to use it This medication comes as a tablet. You should put it in your mouth and swallow it with a glass of water. Do not chew, break or crush it. Swallow it whole. What to do if you are pregnant Tell your physician if you become pregnant. There are not enough studies about this medication in pregnant women. Use the medication during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 750 Mg Tablets, Fasting

Metformin Er 750 Mg Tablets, Fasting

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00834743 Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information The objective of this study is to compare the rate and extent of absorption of metformin from a test formulation of Metformin ER 750 mg Tablets versus the reference Glucophage XR 750 mg Tablets under fasting conditions. Drug: Glucophage XR 750 mg Tablets Drug: Metformin ER 750 mg Tablets Criteria for Evaluation: FDA Bioequivalence Criteria Statistical Methods: FDA bioequivalence statistical methods A Two-Way Crossover, Open-Label, Single-Dose, Fasting, Bioequivalence Study of Metformin ER 750 mg Tablets Versus Glucophage XR 750 mg Tablets in Normal Healthy Non-smoking Male and Female Subjects Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Cmax (Maximum Observed Concentration of Drug Substance in Plasma) [TimeFrame:Blood samples collected over a 36 hour period.] AUC0-t (Area Under the Concentration-time Curve From Time Zero to Time of Last Measurable Concentration) [TimeFrame:Blood samples collected over a 36 hour period.] AUC0-inf (Area Under the Concentration-time Curve From Time Zero to Infinity) [TimeFrame:Blood samples collected over a 36 hour period.] Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Info Continue reading >>

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

What should I watch for? Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. This medicine may cause ovulation in premenopausal women who do not have regular monthly periods. This may increase your chances of becoming pregnant. You should not take this medicine if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Talk with your doctor or health care professional about your birth control options while taking this medicine. Contact your doctor or health care professional right away if think you are pregnant. The tablet shell for some brands of this medicine does not dissolve. This is normal. The tablet shell may appear whole in the stool. This is not a cause for concern. If you are going to need surgery, a MR Continue reading >>

Metformin Er - Pill Identifier | Drugs.com

Metformin Er - Pill Identifier | Drugs.com

Below are results that match your criteria. Click on an image or generic/brand name to search for information about the drug in our database. Use the pill finder to identify medications byvisual appearance or medicine name. All fields are optional. How to identify a pill using the Pill Identifier? Enter the imprint code that appears on the pill e.g. L484 You may also search by drug name or NDC code Useful tip: Search for the imprint first, then refine by color and shape if you have too many results. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum, Truven Health Analytics, Inc., National Library of Medicine and Drugs.com is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This drug information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill , knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Drugs.com and its content providers do not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Copyright 2018 Dru Continue reading >>

Metformin Er

Metformin Er

What Is Metformin ER? Metformin ER (Glucophage XR®, Glutametz®, and Fortamet®) is a prescription medication licensed to treat type 2 diabetes (also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes). The drug is a long-acting, extended-release version of metformin. (Click Metformin Uses for more information on what metformin ER is used for, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes Metformin ER? Generic metformin ER is made by several manufacturers. Glucophage and Glucophage XR are manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Glutametz is made by Depomed Inc., and Fortamet is made by Andrx Labs. How Does Metformin ER Work? Metformin ER works in several ways. For example, it decreases the amount of sugar (glucose) made by the liver. Metformin ER can also decrease the amount of sugar absorbed into the body (from the diet) and can decrease insulin resistance, helping the body to use insulin better. Because metformin ER does not increase the amount of insulin produced by the body, it is less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), as many other diabetes medications can do (see Alternatives to Metformin). There have been several studies looking at the effects of metformin ER for type 2 diabetes. In these studies, metformin ER has been shown to decrease fasting blood sugar and to decrease hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). HbA1c is a test used to measure long-term blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels are usually less than 6 percent in people without diabetes; people with diabetes usually have higher HbA1c results. Studies have shown that the higher the HbA1c, the greater the chance for developing long-term problems related to diabetes. This includes problems such as heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, and Continue reading >>

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Am currently taking Metformin HCL ER, 2 - 500mg tabs daily, at about 6pm, with dinner. In the two months since my surgery my fasting blood glucose level has gone down; in May it ranged from 83-109, mostly in the 90's. However, probably because of overeating in the afternoon, I have gained about 10 lbs. So I am wondering if I should split the Met dose between breakfast and dinner, or take it all in the morning, with my other pills (mostly supplements). Perhaps it would be more effective peaking in the afternoon, when I am eating the most, rather than late night/early morning, as it is now. I don't want to risk morning hypos, true or false - but do want to lose that weight, planning to cut down the Met when I reach a certain goal. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Met builds in the body and works on the liver, you can try splitting it that might help. Met is not suppose to cause a hypo right now your readings look very good you posted, best wishes to you it never did that for me. I also take two Metformin ER tablets per day (500 mg) and I take one with breakfast and one at bedtime. It worked out to be the easiest times of day for me to remember. Also, I'm sure you know that the ER tablets should not be broken. Thanks - will try taking one in the evening and one in the morning, and see how that goes... I take my kombiglyze xr 2000mg with my evening meal. TUJUEO metformin xr Humalog soon to be novolog I take the regular metformin. My doctor says it shouldn't matter when I take it. But I find it does. I find I get an immediate effect within a few hours as well as an accumulated effect. I take my metformin 3 x a day, before bed, around 5 am and around 9 am. Those are the times my liver seems more active and the metformin seems to calm it down. 115 pounds, Breast Can Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

The Hugely Inflated Prices Of Glumetza And Metformin Er

The Hugely Inflated Prices Of Glumetza And Metformin Er

I have been taking metformin (Glucophage) for about three years. My doctor recommended it since my A1c reading had been climbing from about 5.5 to 6.3% over a two-year period. There is also a history of Type 2 diabetes on the paternal side of my family. Metformin caused me some stomach upset so I switched to Glumetza, a coated form of the same drug, Glucophage, a standard treatment for diabetes that has been available in the United States since 1995. I have excellent insurance coverage and receive all my medications in the most economical form, three month prescriptions delivered by mail. On February 6th, Caremark mail service called to tell me there was a prescription coming for which I would have to sign. I told the caller that it was fine to leave it at the door. The Caremark representative said that was not possible since it was a high-value prescription. The prescription came the next day, I signed for it, and I checked the invoice only because the person on the phone had told me it was a “high-value prescription” and I knew it was only metformin. When I looked at the bottom of the invoice I noticed that the listed price was $14,020.87. My co-pay was $40.00 I called Caremark to tell them about the computer error. I didn’t think it was possible that metformin cost $14,020.87. I was even more certain that this was a computer error because the prescription was not Glumetza, but a generic, metformin ER. It was no error. And it was a generic prescription. The brand name Glumetza, sold for over $16,000 for a three-month supply. I was even more stunned than angry and I began to check around. I was about seven months late to the Glumetza story. Probably many of you followed the sale of Glumetza in 2015 to the now notorious Valeant Pharmaceuticals. By the time I reach Continue reading >>

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

If you have high blood glucose levels, you may take metformin hydrochloride, an oral anti-hyperglycemic medication that lowers blood sugar. Metformin may also help you lose weight in some cases by decreasing your appetite. Clinical studies have not proven that metformin helps you lose weight if you don't have Type 2 diabetes or other metabolic disorders that cause insulin resistance. It may help prevent weight gain or cause modest weight loss if you're taking antipsychotic drugs that cause weight gain. Metformin comes in several doses, including a 500-milligram extended release form, which you may find easier to take. Video of the Day Metformin might help you lose weight if you have metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary disease, both associated with insulin resistance. The pancreas releases insulin in response to glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin helps cells remove glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat large amounts of high-carb foods, the pancreas may overproduce insulin to keep up. Eventually, your cells stop responding to the insulin and your blood glucose levels rise. Because your cells feel starved for energy, you feel hungry all the time and may crave carbohydrates. Metformin helps cells respond better to insulin, so you don't feel as hungry. Insulin can also cause your liver to convert extra calories to fat. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose your liver produces, and also decreases the amount of glucose absorbed in your intestines. Decreased amounts of glucose in your bloodstream results in less glucose absorbed by your cells. When you absorb less glucose, you lose weight. An Indian study published in the March 2011 "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology" reported that metformin increased weight loss in people taking olanzapine, an antipsychoti Continue reading >>

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