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Metformin Er

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Am currently taking Metformin HCL ER, 2 - 500mg tabs daily, at about 6pm, with dinner. In the two months since my surgery my fasting blood glucose level has gone down; in May it ranged from 83-109, mostly in the 90's. However, probably because of overeating in the afternoon, I have gained about 10 lbs. So I am wondering if I should split the Met dose between breakfast and dinner, or take it all in the morning, with my other pills (mostly supplements). Perhaps it would be more effective peaking in the afternoon, when I am eating the most, rather than late night/early morning, as it is now. I don't want to risk morning hypos, true or false - but do want to lose that weight, planning to cut down the Met when I reach a certain goal. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Met builds in the body and works on the liver, you can try splitting it that might help. Met is not suppose to cause a hypo right now your readings look very good you posted, best wishes to you it never did that for me. I also take two Metformin ER tablets per day (500 mg) and I take one with breakfast and one at bedtime. It worked out to be the easiest times of day for me to remember. Also, I'm sure you know that the ER tablets should not be broken. Thanks - will try taking one in the evening and one in the morning, and see how that goes... I take my kombiglyze xr 2000mg with my evening meal. TUJUEO metformin xr Humalog soon to be novolog I take the regular metformin. My doctor says it shouldn't matter when I take it. But I find it does. I find I get an immediate effect within a few hours as well as an accumulated effect. I take my metformin 3 x a day, before bed, around 5 am and around 9 am. Those are the times my liver seems more active and the metformin seems to calm it down. 115 pounds, Breast Can Continue reading >>

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Brand name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage XR, Glumetza Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifest Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Generic Name: metformin hydrochloride Dosage Form: tablet, extended release Metformin Extended Release Tablets Description Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP are an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5· HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP contain 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg meets USP dissolution Test 3. System Components and Performance- Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP comprises a swellable matrix system. In the aqueous gastrointestinal (GI) environment, the dosage form swells remarkably thereby increasing in size and geometry from where drug is released slowly by a process of diffusion through the gel matrix that is essentially independent of pH. The hydrated polymer system is not rigid and is expected to be broken up by normal peristalsis in the GI tract. The biologically inert components of the tablet may occasionally remain intact during GI transit and will be Continue reading >>

Metformin Er And Diarrhea | Diabetic Connect

Metformin Er And Diarrhea | Diabetic Connect

Ive been on Metformin Er since dec 11th of 2016 and would have occasional diarrhea. Well ever since the day after Thanksgiving I have been having almost daily diarrhea(1-4 times a day). I have kind of gotten away from my diet lately. Any suggestions how I can control it? I have very little to no stomach issues that accompany it. Just a normal urge to go. Also on days I dont go I have what feels like a belly full of gas. I know Metformin affects people differently. Thank you so much doctor took hubby of of Metformin raised his creatine levels cant ever take again he went to insulin and glineprine 5 mg good luck It helps to eat half your meat, then take the metformin and eat the rest of your meal. Worked for me. A friend who was on it long before me told me to do that. This was a serious problem for me during my first year on Metformin. And it got worse each time I refilled my prescription because I had to adjust to a different brand. My doctor was not at all helpful. I really did not want to change medications because Metformin is the safest with many other added benefits. SoI first gained some serious control over my diet. I went as low carb as I possibly could. That lowered my A1c enough that I could reduce the amount of Metformin from 2000mg daily to 1000mg daily. That made all the difference for me. No more diarrhea! I also changed pharmacies. The one I use now doesn't change brands often and if they do, they inform me at the time I refill my prescription so I can be prepared for an adjustment period. The last time it changed, I didn't suffer diarrhea at all. I think that is because of the lower dose. If I have to increase my dosage in the future, I expect the diarrhea will return. I'm a small person and I think 2000mg is just too much. I hope this helps you because Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl 1000mg Er For $7,000+ / Month?!?

Metformin Hcl 1000mg Er For $7,000+ / Month?!?

There is something terribly wrong with Pharmaceutical pricing in our country. Pharmaceutical costs continue to spiral out of control. I have a client ("Susie") who is starting on Medicare for 10/1/2017. A few weeks ago when we reviewed her Prescription costs, she was taking Metformin HCL 1000mg, which is only about $6.50/month retail cost. This is a very reasonable price for a generic drug used to treat a chronic condition like Type 2 diabetes. ​ Recently, Susie had been having some stomach discomfort with the Metformin 1000 HCL so her doctor prescribed her same medication in an Extended Release (ER) form (Metformin HCL 1000mg ER) to minimize the impact on her stomach. On Susie's current group health insurance plan, her copay for the new medication (Metformin HCL 1000mg ER) went up from about $5/month to $30 per month. This was manageable and well worth it since the ER pills reduced/eliminated her stomach discomfort. Last week, Susie notified me of her medication change (from Metformin HCL 1000 mg to Metformin HCL ER 1000mg), so we could re-run her Part D analysis before she goes on Medicare for 10/1/2017. I was absolutely shocked when I updated her medication list on Medicare.gov and saw: (a) the Metformin HCL ER 1000mg was not covered on her Part D formulary (b) the monthly retail cost for the Metformin HCL ER 1000mg was $7,000+ per month!! I figured this had to be a mistake. I called Humana (her Part D Plan) to see what the cost would be for this Metformin ER 1000mg if Susie applied for an Exception to the formulary. The Humana representative said she could probably get an exception to the formulary due to the side effects with the regular Metformin HCL 1000mg. However, Humana is unable to tell us what the cost of the Metformin ER 1000mg will be since it is not lis Continue reading >>

The Slower The Better

The Slower The Better

Endocrine Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Department of Biomedical Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Obesity Agency, Careggi University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50134 Florence, Italy C. M. Rotella, Email: [email protected] . Received 2014 Jan 20; Accepted 2014 Feb 27. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A new formulation of metformin: metformin extended-release (ER) is now available, with different formulations in each country and it appears relevant to discuss the management of this drug in clinical practice. Metformin, an oral biguanide hypoglycemic agent, is an efficacious tool in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin’s efficacy, security profile, benefic cardiovascular and metabolic effects make this drug as the first agent of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, together with lifestyle modifications [ 1 ]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in the fasting state induces an increase in hepatic gluconeogenesis and induces hyperglycemia in the early morning. Metformin, as its major effect, decreases hepatic glucose output lowering fasting glycaemia and, secondarily, it increases glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. It is generally well tolerated, despite the fact that the most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal ones, which may be tampered by dose titration. In monotherapy metformin decreases HbA1c levels by 0.6–1.0 % and this is not accompanied by hypoglycemia in the large majority of patients. Metformin is neutral with respect to weight or, possibly, induces a modest weight loss. The UKPDS has demonstrated a beneficial effect of metformin therapy on CVD outcomes [ 2 ]. Severe renal dysfunc Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Generic Name: Metformin Extended-Release Tablets (met FOR min) Brand Name: Fortamet, Glucophage XR Warning Rarely, metformin may cause an acid health problem in the blood (lactic acidosis). The risk of lactic acidosis is higher in people with kidney problems and in people who take certain other drugs like topiramate. The risk is also higher in people with liver problems or heart failure, in older people (65 or older), or with alcohol use. If lactic acidosis happens, it can lead to other health problems and can be deadly. Lab tests to check the kidneys may be done while taking this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). Talk with the doctor. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of too much lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) like fast breathing, fast or slow heartbeat, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad upset stomach or throwing up, feeling very sleepy, shortness of breath, feeling very tired or weak, very bad dizziness, feeling cold, or muscle pain or cramps. Do not take this medicine if you have a very bad infection, low oxygen, or a lot of fluid loss (dehydration). Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol. If you are having an exam or test with contrast or have had one within the past 48 hours, talk with your doctor. Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Uses of Metformin Extended-Release Tablets: It is used to lower blood sugar in patients with high blood sugar (diabetes). What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Metformin Extended-Release Tablets? If you have an allergy to metformin or any other part of this medicine. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, o Continue reading >>

Metformin Er Blink Price $8.50 | Blink Health

Metformin Er Blink Price $8.50 | Blink Health

Overview How to use Side effects Precautions Storage Drug interactions Overdose More Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily with the evening meal. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor' Continue reading >>

Why Not Metformin Er (extended Release)?

Why Not Metformin Er (extended Release)?

Friend "Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT)"; dx Jan. 2014 While not yet on meds, I wouldn't be surprised to find it in my future. And when it comes to oral medications, Metformin seems to be the "starter drug," so to speak. But after two years as a member of this website, I've noticed that most people on Metformin seem NOT to be on the "ER" (extended release) version, and my question is: WHY NOT? Is the ER version less effective? Is it more expensive? Because given the commonly cited intestinal side-effects of regular Metformin, opting for the ER version seems like a no-brainer to me. Any feedback would be appreciated! Thanks! D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Some have no issues with the regular, the max doses is smaller with the ER but I suppose its up to what a person needs and can handle and what a doctor wants them on. I've also read these threads, and what I see quite a lot is people who have had gastrointestinal problems for months or even years, but their doctors haven't offered them the ER/SR substitutes; so my conclusion, for what it's worth, is that busy doctors just don't think to do so unless people complain. I've even seen posts from members saying that their doctor wasn't aware of the alternative. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) I was on the regular 2550 mg for 9 years. I just started having problems. My Endo switched me to the ER, first 500, now 1000. I am sure it will need to be upped agains. If I can't stand the ER we will talk about other drugs. The ER costs me the same $1.97 per month. If you take the 1000 mg of the brand name ER it is quite expensive. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic Continue reading >>

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

If you have high blood glucose levels, you may take metformin hydrochloride, an oral anti-hyperglycemic medication that lowers blood sugar. Metformin may also help you lose weight in some cases by decreasing your appetite. Clinical studies have not proven that metformin helps you lose weight if you don't have Type 2 diabetes or other metabolic disorders that cause insulin resistance. It may help prevent weight gain or cause modest weight loss if you're taking antipsychotic drugs that cause weight gain. Metformin comes in several doses, including a 500-milligram extended release form, which you may find easier to take. Video of the Day Metformin might help you lose weight if you have metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary disease, both associated with insulin resistance. The pancreas releases insulin in response to glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin helps cells remove glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat large amounts of high-carb foods, the pancreas may overproduce insulin to keep up. Eventually, your cells stop responding to the insulin and your blood glucose levels rise. Because your cells feel starved for energy, you feel hungry all the time and may crave carbohydrates. Metformin helps cells respond better to insulin, so you don't feel as hungry. Insulin can also cause your liver to convert extra calories to fat. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose your liver produces, and also decreases the amount of glucose absorbed in your intestines. Decreased amounts of glucose in your bloodstream results in less glucose absorbed by your cells. When you absorb less glucose, you lose weight. An Indian study published in the March 2011 "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology" reported that metformin increased weight loss in people taking olanzapine, an antipsychoti Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

What is this Medicine? METFORMIN (met FOR min) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It helps to control blood sugar. Treatment is combined with diet and exercise. This medicine can be used alone or with other medicines for diabetes. Generic 94.28%Brand 5.72% *Brand contains same active ingredient but may not represent FDA-approved generic equivalent 750mg1000mg500mg Ingredients Close All Sections Reported Side Effects for Metformin Hydrochloride 500mg Extended-Release Tablet Close Elements of your daily lifestyle may have an effect on the medications you are taking. Drug interactions can result in unwanted side effects, reduce the effectiveness of your medicine or possibly increase the action of a particular medicine. Close All Interactions Close If you use tobacco or are trying to quit tobacco use, you may need to monitor your blood sugar more frequently. Nicotine, a component of tobacco, can increase the blood sugar. Also, if you are trying to quit smoking, as your body adjusts to not smoking, your blood sugar levels may change; the actions of Antidiabetic Agents (medicines used to treat diabetes) may be increased and this could lead to low blood sugar. Know the symptoms of low or high blood sugar and report them if they occur. Monitor your blood sugar regularly. Close Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adver Continue reading >>

The Hugely Inflated Prices Of Glumetza And Metformin Er

The Hugely Inflated Prices Of Glumetza And Metformin Er

I have been taking metformin (Glucophage) for about three years. My doctor recommended it since my A1c reading had been climbing from about 5.5 to 6.3% over a two-year period. There is also a history of Type 2 diabetes on the paternal side of my family. Metformin caused me some stomach upset so I switched to Glumetza, a coated form of the same drug, Glucophage, a standard treatment for diabetes that has been available in the United States since 1995. I have excellent insurance coverage and receive all my medications in the most economical form, three month prescriptions delivered by mail. On February 6th, Caremark mail service called to tell me there was a prescription coming for which I would have to sign. I told the caller that it was fine to leave it at the door. The Caremark representative said that was not possible since it was a high-value prescription. The prescription came the next day, I signed for it, and I checked the invoice only because the person on the phone had told me it was a “high-value prescription” and I knew it was only metformin. When I looked at the bottom of the invoice I noticed that the listed price was $14,020.87. My co-pay was $40.00 I called Caremark to tell them about the computer error. I didn’t think it was possible that metformin cost $14,020.87. I was even more certain that this was a computer error because the prescription was not Glumetza, but a generic, metformin ER. It was no error. And it was a generic prescription. The brand name Glumetza, sold for over $16,000 for a three-month supply. I was even more stunned than angry and I began to check around. I was about seven months late to the Glumetza story. Probably many of you followed the sale of Glumetza in 2015 to the now notorious Valeant Pharmaceuticals. By the time I reach Continue reading >>

Metformin Er

Metformin Er

What Is Metformin ER? Metformin ER (Glucophage XR®, Glutametz®, and Fortamet®) is a prescription medication licensed to treat type 2 diabetes (also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes). The drug is a long-acting, extended-release version of metformin. (Click Metformin Uses for more information on what metformin ER is used for, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes Metformin ER? Generic metformin ER is made by several manufacturers. Glucophage and Glucophage XR are manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Glutametz is made by Depomed Inc., and Fortamet is made by Andrx Labs. How Does Metformin ER Work? Metformin ER works in several ways. For example, it decreases the amount of sugar (glucose) made by the liver. Metformin ER can also decrease the amount of sugar absorbed into the body (from the diet) and can decrease insulin resistance, helping the body to use insulin better. Because metformin ER does not increase the amount of insulin produced by the body, it is less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), as many other diabetes medications can do (see Alternatives to Metformin). There have been several studies looking at the effects of metformin ER for type 2 diabetes. In these studies, metformin ER has been shown to decrease fasting blood sugar and to decrease hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). HbA1c is a test used to measure long-term blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels are usually less than 6 percent in people without diabetes; people with diabetes usually have higher HbA1c results. Studies have shown that the higher the HbA1c, the greater the chance for developing long-term problems related to diabetes. This includes problems such as heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, and Continue reading >>

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