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Metformin Equivalent

Herbal Alternatives To Metformin

Herbal Alternatives To Metformin

Metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet) is typically prescribed to counteract the effects of insulin resistance -- the body's sluggish response to the blood-sugar-lowering hormone insulin. Insulin resistance can lead to high blood sugars and may eventually progress to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Metformin improves insulin sensitivity of the body tissues and reduces liver glucose production, both of which help lower blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends metformin as a first-choice medicine to treat T2DM. It is also sometimes used in combination with exercise and weight loss in people with prediabetes. Some evidence suggests that a few herbs might mimic some of the effects of metformin. However, no herb is a proven alternative to metformin. Video of the Day Goat’s rue, or Galega officinalis, is an age-old remedy. In times past, it was used for assorted ailments, including diabetes. Metformin is a man-made chemical that's closely related to a substance found in goat’s rue. Animal studies from the 1970s and 1980s established that substances in goat's rue have blood-sugar-lowering effects. Some of these chemicals can be toxic, however, so human studies are lacking. A recent animal study was published in April 2008 in the "British Journal of Pharmacology." Researchers found that mice fed galegine -- a chemical found in goat's rue -- ate less, lost weight and had reduced blood sugar levels, compared to mice that weren't fed the chemical. Goat's rue is not approved for diabetes treatment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or Germany's Commission E, a scientific advisory board that reviews and approves herbal medicines. Commission E noted significant health risks with goat's rue and the availability of more effective diabetes tr Continue reading >>

New Metformin Generic Now In Pharmacies

New Metformin Generic Now In Pharmacies

Diabetes—specifically type 2 or adult onset diabetes—is a growing epidemic in the United States, in part to the increase in obesity over the past 10 years. However, there are several medications that (with healthy diet and excercise) can help keep your blood sugar under control. Glumetza is the newest option to have a generic version approved, which should mean lower prices and more options for you in the near future. When will generic Glumetza be in pharmacies? Generic Glumetza (metformin ER) tablets are now available—you can fill your prescription at your regular pharmacy. How is generic Glumetza (metformin ER) available? Generic Glumetza is a tablet, available in 500 mg and 1000 mg strengths. Do I have more than one generic option for Glumetza? No. Lupin Pharmaceuticals is currently the only pharmaceutical company allowed to make the generic of Glumetza. They have been granted exclusivity for 6 months or 180 days. After that, you may start to see other companies creating their own generic versions (which should help bring prices down even further). Are there any similar alternatives to Glumetza? Yes! Extended-release metformin is actually available in three brand-name drugs, all of which now have generic alternatives: Glumetza, Fortamet, and Glucophage XR. Since the generic for Glucophage XR has been in pharmacies for quite some time, it may be significantly less expensive, especially if you’re paying out of pocket. Is there a reason why my doctor might still prescribe me Glumetza instead? Maybe—each version of metformin ER is different in the way it releases the medication into the body. For more information on the differences between Glumetza and Fortamet see our previous article. What are the most common side effects of generic Glumetza (Metformin HCl ER Continue reading >>

Cost-minimization Analysis Of Metformin And Acarbose In Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Cost-minimization Analysis Of Metformin And Acarbose In Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin is the first-line oral hypoglycemic agent for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) per international guidelines with proven efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. However, little information comparing it with acarbose exists. To study the cost-effectiveness of metformin and acarbosetwo extensively adopted agentsin treating T2DM. Cost-minimization analysis was conducted on the assumption that metformin and acarbose have equivalent clinical effectiveness. The cost of treatment was detected and evaluated from a payers perspective. In sensitivity analyses, several clinical scenarios were developed according to clinical practices and physicians prescribing behaviors in China. Metformin can save annual treatment costs by 39.87% to 40.97% compared with acarbose. Under a wide range of assumptions on utilization profile and physician prescribing behavior, it saves costs by 19.83% to 40.97% in patients whose weight is 60 kg or less and by 39.87% to 70.49% in patients whose weight is more than 60 kg, which corroborates the results that metformin is more cost-effective than acarbose. Metformin appears to provide better value for money than does acarbose. Findings from this study are consistent with those from previous studies that metformin is undoubtedly the first choice in the management of T2DM, with significant glucose-lowering effects and low treatment costs. Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Are There Any Natural Alternatives To Metformin?

Are There Any Natural Alternatives To Metformin?

What can you do if you have PCOS but don't want to take metformin or can't tolerate its unpleasant side effects? Actually, there are a number of things you can do that should be equally effective, but don't have any side effects. Metformin vs. Lifestyle Improvement Several medical research studies have shown that just changing your diet and lifestyle can be just as effective as taking metformin. For example, the Universidade de São Paulo in Brazil studied 40 women who had PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome). Fifteen women took metformin for six months and 12 just improved their lifestyle. At the end of six months, the results were virtually the same for both groups. About 67% in each group had improvements in their menstrual cycle. Both groups had smaller waists and lost weight. Of course, taking drugs to manage your PCOS symptoms and improving your lifestyle are not mutually exclusive! So you're into taking drugs, you can do both! OK, so maybe you're wondering what a "lifestyle" consists of. For starters, it consists of a diet especially designed to rebalance your hormones, increased exercise, better management of chronic stress, and getting enough sleep. Advantages of a More Holistic Approach There are several compelling reasons why you should consider a more "holistic" approach using physical activity, healthy diet, stress management, and special nutrients. A healthy diet and lifestyle is just as effective as metformin (Glucophage). You may be able to reduce your dosage or eliminate it altogether. A healthy diet and lifestyle is ultimately less expensive. A holistic approach builds your health whereas drugs does not. A holistic approach does not have drug side effects and is safer than taking drugs. The role of healthy diet, exercise and stress management is extensivel Continue reading >>

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

As of 2006 diabetes was the seventh cause of death in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Society. By 2007 the medical costs of diagnosed diabetes exceeded $100 billion. Medication is a major factor in treating diabetes. Metformin is often the drug prescribed to newly diagnosed diabetics, notes FamilyDoctor.org. However there are other medications that be used in addition to metformin. Video of the Day Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are a form of oral diabetes medication that target the digestive system. These drugs decrease the absorption of blood sugar by the stomach and intestines, explains FamilyDoctor.org. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors may cause abdominal pain, loose bowel movement, or bloatedness. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 Inhibitors Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, or DPP-4 inhibitors, are oral medicines that aid the body in producing insulin after meals. DPP-4 inhibitors accomplish this by preventing the destruction of a biochemical called GLP-1. This biochemical helps reduce blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. Incretin mimetics are injectable diabetic medications that typically lower blood sugar by stimulating insulin release. Incretin mimetics can cause nausea and possibly hypoglycemia, explains the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a biochemical that is normally produced by the pancreas, and utilized to regulate blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. However diabetes either prevents the body from producing insulin, or renders the body unable to utilize the insulin produced. As such, it is necessary for some diabetics to use artificial insulin. However because insulin breaks down upon contact with digestive juices insulin must injected directly Continue reading >>

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

From diabetes to cancer, berberine matches - or beats - this patent medicine every time! As many know, metformin is the number one prescription medication for type-2 diabetes. The patent for the name-brand of this patent medicine, Glucophage®, expired years ago and as a result generic-brand competition (metformin) brought this patent medicine’s price down so that it’s relatively inexpensive, especially when compared with nearly any other medication still covered by a patent. Mainstream medical research has found other uses for this un-natural molecule, including (but not limited to) lipid, blood pressure, and insulin resistance lowering effects, anti-cancer effects, improvement of polycystic ovarian syndrome, combatting Alzheimer’s disease, and extending life span in mice. Surprising guests on the metformin bandwagon Some proponents of natural therapies – including, surprisingly, two nationally and internationally circulated health magazines – have climbed on the metformin bandwagon, writing articles about the “health benefits” of metformin, and even advocating that otherwise healthy people take this patent medicine every day as a preventive. They admit that there are known side effects, but write that these are few, and that the benefits outweigh the risks. If there aren’t any natural treatment alternatives that are as effective, or more effective, than a patent medicine or other un-natural molecule – especially in serious or life-threatening situations – then the use of a patent medication of course makes sense. But when there are natural alternatives that work just as well or better, the rule is – and always should be – to “Copy Nature.” Human bodies are formed from the molecules of planet Earth, and powered by the energies of this planet Continue reading >>

Metformin Mylan 500mg, 850mg & 1000mg Film-coated Tablets

Metformin Mylan 500mg, 850mg & 1000mg Film-coated Tablets

Table of Contents Go to top of the page Metformin Mylan 500 mg film-coated tablets Metformin Mylan 850 mg film-coated tablets Metformin Mylan 1000 mg film-coated tablets Go to top of the page 500mg: Each 500 mg film-coated tablet contains 500 mg metformin hydrochloride equivalent to metformin base 390 mg. 850mg: Each 850 mg film-coated tablet contains 850 mg metformin hydrochloride equivalent to metformin base 662.9 mg. 1000mg: Each 1000 mg film-coated tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride equivalent to metformin base 780 mg. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Go to top of the page Film-coated tablet. 500 mg: White, round, normal convex, film-coated tablets plain on both sides. Diameter about 12.0 mm. 850 mg: White, round, normal convex, film-coated tablets plain on both sides. Diameter about 13.5 mm. 1000 mg: White, oval, film coated tablet, debossed “MF” and “3” on either side of the breakline on one side and “G” on the other side. The tablet can be divided into equal halves. Go to top of the page Go to top of the page Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly in overweight patients, when dietary management and exercise alone does not result in adequate glycaemic control. • In adults, Metformin Mylan film-coated tablets may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other oral anti-diabetic agents or with insulin. • In children from 10 years of age and adolescents, Metformin Mylan film-coated tablets may be used as monotherapy or in combination with insulin. A reduction of diabetic complications has been shown in overweight type 2 diabetic adult patients treated with metformin as first-line therapy after diet failure (see section 5.1). Go to top of the page Posology Adults with normal renal function (GFR ≥ 90 mL/ Continue reading >>

Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade

Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade Type 2 diabetes drug taken orally and in widespread use for more than a decade has been found to have distinct advantages over nine other, mostly newer medications used to control the chronic disease, according to a new study. A type 2 diabetes drug taken orally and in widespread use for more than a decade has been found to have distinct advantages over nine other, mostly newer medications used to control the chronic disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins. In their report, published online July 16 in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, the Hopkins team found that metformin, first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1995 (and sold as Glucophage, Riomet and Fortamet), not only controlled blood sugar levels but also was less likely to cause weight gain and more likely than others to lower bad cholesterol levels in the blood. Researchers say these health benefits are important because they can potentially ward off heart disease and other life-threatening consequence from diabetes. More than 15 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. "Sometimes newer is not necessarily better," says lead study author Shari Bolen, M.D., an internist at Hopkins. "Issues like blood sugar levels, weight gain and cost could be significant factors to many patients struggling to stay in good health," says Bolen, an instructor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In what is believed to be the largest drug comparison of its kind, the scientists showed that all of the commonly used oral medications worked much the same at lowering and controlling blood sugar levels, and were equally safe Continue reading >>

Berberine Is Superior To Metformin

Berberine Is Superior To Metformin

New findings show that berberine has antiobesity effects and that … Metformin is a widely used first-line antidiabetic drug prescribed by doctors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, particularly in the overweight and obese. By Will Block A new review focuses on several studies showing that the plant alkaloid berberine can lower blood glucose as effectively as the drug metformin at similar doses (500 mg, taken 3 times/day), and perhaps even better in some ways.1 Berberine is found in Coptis chinensis (goldenthread), Berberis aquifolium (Oregon grape), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), and Berberis aristata (tree turmeric). Traditionally, it has been used for more than 2500 years in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, with growing interest in its effects in metabolic and cardiovascular disease in the Western world in the last decade. Berberine has a wide range of healthful uses that include cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial (it acts against bacterial diarrhea, intestinal parasites, fungal infections, Candida albicans, yeast, and possibly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). Berberine for Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 As we have already reported (see “Take This Dye for Diabetes” in the November 2010 issue), two recent studies (also covered in the recent review) show the effectiveness of berberine compared to metformin for type 2 diabetes.2 In the first study, 36 adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to treatment with berberine or metformin (500 mg 3 times/day) in a 3-month trial. The hypoglycemic effect of berberine was similar to that of metformin. Metformin is a widely used first-line antidiabetic drug prescribed by doctors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, particularly in the Continue reading >>

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

A few weeks ago, I received this email from a diabetic patient of mine. He's been working hard to control his blood sugar. He said, "Hi Frank, I have some very good news that I'm excited to tell you. I've been following your program closely and was a little discouraged. Although my A1c levels [average blood sugar levels] have been dropping, my fasting blood sugar has not. It was still at 123. About two to three weeks ago, I began taking berberine (500 mg, three times daily) and my fasting blood sugar dropped into the 90s. I'm stoked! Sincerely, Rich." So the question I had to answer for myself is, "Why did Rich fail to respond well to my usual program, and then do so well on berberine?" Berberine is a phytochemical (plant chemical) found in many different plants. When used in herbal medicine, the usual sources are barberry, goldenseal, or Oregon grape. It's the main alkaloid of Coptis chinensis, which Asian folk medicine uses to treat diabetes. You also may hear people refer to Coptis chinensis as Chinese Goldthread, Huang-Lian, and Huang-LienIt. Berberine has a lot of uses. It can treat heart disease, immune disorders, digestive problems, eye infections, and other infections. I had never heard of it being all that effective in diabetes. So as soon as Rich sent me that message, I looked into it. I found several well-written scientific articles describing an effect of berberine that I could hardly believe. It seems that you can use it as a substitute for insulin. One study, published just last year looked at the effect of berberine on how well muscle cells take in sugar. As you probably already know, except when we are actively exercising, sugar cannot get into muscle cells unless insulin is present to escort it in. That's why the blood sugar goes up when patients either Continue reading >>

Comparative Efficacy Of Glimepiride And Metformin In Monotherapy Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Comparative Efficacy Of Glimepiride And Metformin In Monotherapy Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Comparative efficacy of glimepiride and metformin in monotherapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Comparative efficacy of glimepiride and metformin in monotherapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Hongmei Zhu, Shuang Zhu, [...], and Siu-wai Leung Metformin treatment has been the most recommended monotherapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) for decades but is challenged by new antidiabetic drugs. This study conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing the efficacy of metformin and glimepiride in monotherapy of T2DM. A literature search for RCTs on glimepiride and metformin was conducted on the bibliographic databases, including PubMed, Cochrane Library and ScienceDirect, from their inceptions to 25 Mar 2013. All RCTs were selected according to pre-specified eligibility criteria. The quality of articles was assessed with the Cochranes risk of bias tool. Statistical meta-analysis evaluated the overall effects and biochemical indices of T2DM. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses evaluated the robustness and explained the heterogeneity of the results. Begg and Eggers tests quantified possible publication biases. Results were represented as "standard mean difference or odds ratio [95% confidence internals] P value". Fifteen RCTs with 1681 adult T2DM patients were included for me Continue reading >>

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The “natural” blood-sugar remedy that had been sidelined for far too long What I’m about to tell you may be shocking. And it’s sure to ruffle the feathers of many of the “natural know-it-alls.” But the science is clear, so I’m not afraid to say it: If you have unmanaged Type II diabetes, you should consider the drug metformin as a first line of treatment. And you won’t get the full story anywhere else, since the natural health industry wouldn’t be caught dead recommending a drug. So, please allow me to do the honors here… Think of it as your emergency “get out of jail free card” Diabetes is deadly. High blood sugar coursing through your body destroys your eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, and more. So the sooner you bring it down the better. (Just like high blood pressure, for which I also recommend tried and true medications as a first-line treatment for unmanaged hypertension.) And in this case, the science is clear—the drug metformin has been proven safe and effective for most people. And since it’s now a generic drug, it’s highly cost effective, too. Now don’t get me wrong…I’m not saying diet and exercise isn’t important. In fact, they’re the best means for preventing and even reversing Type II diabetes entirely. Something metformin can’t do. And there are certainly dietary supplements that can help with maintaining healthy blood sugar (like berberine). But Type II diabetes doesn’t develop overnight. And let’s face it, changing the habits and consequences that got us there in the first place isn’t an overnight task either. So if you need additional help, this is one rare instance where you shouldn’t be afraid to look at a mainstream therapy. And when an option this effective comes along to help kick-start your efforts saf Continue reading >>

Alternatives To Metformin

Alternatives To Metformin

What Are the Alternatives to Metformin? Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A long-acting form, metformin ER (Glucophage XR®), is also available. For most people, metformin is effective in treating their diabetes, and most people tolerate it well. However, as with all medicines, side effects can occur. In other cases, the medicine may not completely control a person's diabetes. Fortunately, there are several alternatives to metformin. Some of the metformin alternatives include: Lifestyle Changes for Type 2 Diabetes Many lifestyle changes have been shown to be very effective for controlling type 2 diabetes (especially early type 2 diabetes). These lifestyle changes include weight loss, becoming more physically active (see Diabetes and Exercise), and changes in diet (see Diabetic Diet). In fact, these changes are important for all people with type 2 diabetes, including people taking diabetes medications. For many people, lifestyle changes alone may not be enough to adequately control type 2 diabetes. For these people, medications (including oral and injectable medications) may be necessary. Fortunately, there are many different types of oral medications available to treat type 2 diabetes, including: Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are medications that force the pancreas to produce more insulin. Because of this, they are very effective, but are also more likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). These medications include: Meglitinides Meglitinides are similar to sulfonylureas, in that they force the pancreas to produce more insulin. However, they are short-acting and are less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar. They are usually taken before every meal. Meglitinides include: Thiazolidinedio Continue reading >>

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better for Type 2 Diabetes? Use of a sulfonylurea as second-line therapy after metformin for type 2 diabetes is just as effective as a newer agent but far less costly, a new study based on claims data finds. The results were published online February 26 in Diabetes Care by Yuanhui Zhang, a PhD candidate at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, and colleagues. "In light of an incomplete understanding of the pros and cons of second-line medications and the high cost associated with newer medications, the decision to use newer medications should be weighed against the additional cost burden to patients and/or the health system," study coauthor Brian Denton, PhD, of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, told Medscape Medical News. However, the use of retrospective data means that the study is subject to both ascertainment and physician-choice bias, said Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, when asked to comment for Medscape Medical News. Moreover, noted Dr. Garber, the study doesn't adequately account for the adverse effects of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia. "Patients value things differently. If you had a hypoglycemic episode and you don't like that, you're willing to pay a lot more of your discretionary income to avoid having another one." The researchers explain that there are currently 11 classes of approved glucose-lowering medications. Metformin has a long-standing evidence base for efficacy and safety, is inexpensive, and is regarded by most as the primary first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. When metformin fails to achieve or maintain glycemic goals, another agent needs to be added. However, there is no consensus or sufficient evidence supporting the use of one second-line agent over Continue reading >>

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