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Metformin Energy Boost

Stop The Metformin Madness

Stop The Metformin Madness

I have never been a fan of Metformin. It seemed too good to be true. Many years ago I had a conversation with a researcher about all of its possible therapeutic indications. His lab was actively pursuing the anti-cancer angle. That should have been a clue that Metformin might be causing more damage than we recognized, but it wasn’t. At that point, I was still enamored with the wonders of pharmacology and hadn’t yet begun my path toward understanding medication adverse reactions. Indeed, it wasn’t until very recently, when a family member began suffering from one of these reactions, that I began my investigation in full. This is what I learned. Type 2 Diabetes is Big Business The global profits from Type 2 diabetes medications rested at a paltry $23 billion dollars in 2011 but are expected to grow to over $45 billion annually by 2020. The market growth is bolstered in large part by the ever-expanding demand for therapeutics like Metformin or Glucophage. Metformin is the first line of treatment and standard of care for insulin resistance across all populations of Type 2 diabetics with over 49 million Americans on Metformin in 2011-2012. It is particularly popular in women’s health with an increasing reliance on Metformin for the metabolic dysfunction observed in women with PCOS, PCOS-related infertility and even gestational diabetes. Metformin is prescribed so frequently and considered so innocuous that it is sometimes euphemistically referred to as vitamin M. If we quickly scan the safety research for metformin, there is little immediate evidence suggesting any side effects whatsoever. In fact, in addition to controlling blood sugar by blocking the hepatic glucose dump, this drug is suggested to promote weight loss, increase ovulation in women, (thereby helping a Continue reading >>

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Popular Drug Damages Your Cells But Fasting Delivers Energy Jessica came to see me because she had been diagnosed with a condition that is becoming more and more common – PCOS. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is a problem of the adrenal glands that causes: Irregular menstrual cycles Easy fatiguing And even diabetes Jessica was prescribed a diabetes medication called metformin (tradename Glucophage) that seems to help metabolic problems. It also allows people to burn fat so they stop gaining weight. This drug is a first-line therapy for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and has been used for many years. It has the effect of making the body more sensitive to insulin and blocking the liver from putting out more sugar. The net effect of this is to lower blood sugar levels. However, metformin’s specific action reaches deeper into your cells. It blocks the mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cells of your body, from using sugar efficiently. When cells are unable to use sugar, they must switch to fat-burning mode. With the ability to burn fat, the body has lower sugar levels and can actually lose weight! The effect of metformin has been trumpeted for many years. Metformin: Decreases blood glucose Increases fat use Prevents kidney problems Improves PCOS in women Prevents diabetes Lowers cancer rates [1] Because of these effects metformin is now being considered and used for many conditions including: Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Cancers of all types Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Obesity Indeed, as one of my professors stated, it seems that metformin should be “included in the drinking water.” Everyone would supposedly benefit. Many without diabetes, PCOS, or even pre-diabetes are taking it to prevent diabetes and cancer. Beware of Treating Disease with Metformin All of the symptoms and di Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin?

Side Effects Of Metformin?

OK ... hubby was given a new medication yesterday called ActosplusMet. What can you tell me about Metformin? I have heard it referenced on the site and am assuming that it's probably a stronger med than the Actos. We read on a site that one side effect is severe nausea? What are people's experiences with Metformin?[FONT="Century hi MV Im on metformin 2x a day and I love it. I havent had any side effects at all. I find that if you take with or right before food the side effects will minimal(sp)? but im not a Dr and everyone is diffrent. Did they take him off Actos? It will take a few weeks for metformin to start working same as the Actos. Im assuming that they started him on 1 pill for the first week and then start him on 2 the 2nd week? he will feel much better with the metformin. I lost 20+ pds in 4 weeks and still losing(not so much so fast) Is he feeling better at all since you last posted? Oh this diabetes ... we just can't get it figured out! Yes, his doc started him on one a day and then will up him to two. I think the Metformin may have Actos with it? I need to look at the ingredients. He was feeling great this morning with morning glucose at 224 (his best yet) -- but he had himself three eggs with a little cheese (he tried Velveeta) and I guess that wasn't a good idea because now his sugars are at 435. I reminded him he HAS TO look at the labels before he adds anything to his meals. He is also complaining of light headedness and weak. Wonderful to hear about no side effects with the Metf -- I sure hope this starts working fast! Metformin is great but it tends to cause diarrhea. For me it was perfect because I was always backed up so now my system runs perfect. The Byetta cancelled it out and now I'm backed up again. We just upped the Metformin, starting tomorro Continue reading >>

Metformin. Its Worse Than The Diabetes

Metformin. Its Worse Than The Diabetes

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed as type 2 diabetes in Dec 2011and since that time not only have I lost all faith in the service I recieve from my GP, but am appalled at the lack of empathy towards this condition. After being told I was diabetic, I was neither offered; dietry advice or blood sugar testing equipment, (being disabled and on a low income the cost of these test strips is prohibitive.) I have no idea what my blood sugar levels are. I was put on Metformin (2000mg per day) and Statins, the Statins were discontinued after two months because of developing muscle pains. I went back to the GP to discuss the problems I was having (weight loss - from 11stone down to nine stone in three months - and being only 5'6" I now look like a skeleton - and continuation of severe muscular pains in the arms and upper back and the inability to raise my arms above chest height.) My GP told me I needed to exercise more. Being mobility challenged I tried to explain the day to day difficulties I have with regards my mobility and was told to go swimming, his exact turn of phrase was; 'The last time I went swimming the pool was full of fatties puffing and blowing, they get more benefit from this type of exercise.' I was appalled at this remark and have not been back since, except to put in a repeat prescription for sack loads of Metformin. Before beginning Metformin I was happy, healthy, fairly fit (given my mobility problem), had bags of energy and had a good appetite. Now I look like skeletors son, suffer terrible gas, have no appetite, ache from head to toe, and fall asleep faster than Homer Simpsons Father. Diabetes didn't change my life, Metformin did. The side effects of this Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Metformin may be one of the cheapest and most underused weight loss medications out there. Metformin is traditionally reserved for those with diabetes or insulin resistance, but many studies show that it can be effective in overweight or obese patients without diabetes. The only problem? You wouldn't know about it unless you do the research yourself! Use this post to learn everything you need to know about using metformin (both if you have diabetes or if you are simply just overweight): Metformin & How it May Help With Weight Loss Does metformin help with weight loss? The answer is more complex than just a standard "yes" or "no", instead the correct answer is more of a "maybe". What do I mean? Well metformin is a medication that falls into the class of biguanides. The most popular of these medications is metformin (and the topic of our discussion today) which is being used by at least 120 million people worldwide. Classically, metformin is used to treat blood sugar issues, insulin resistance and type II diabetes. It was found a long time ago, that if used for these conditions, metformin does indeed help some patients lose weight. Studies have shown that patients who take metformin with insulin resistance do tend to lose weight - most studies showing a "modest" amount to the tune of around 5-10 pounds. Because these studies have been favorable to some patients (especially those with the conditions listed above), it's normal to ask if it also works for patients who don't have type II diabetes. In order to understand that, we need to understand how metformin works. As it relates to weight loss metformin has powerful actions in 2 main areas: In the mitochondria respiratory chain complex: Activating the mitochondrial pathway is a powerful way to increase energy production an Continue reading >>

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

The Energy Disruptor Metformin Targets Mitochondrial Integrity Via Modification Of Calcium Flux In Cancer Cells

The Energy Disruptor Metformin Targets Mitochondrial Integrity Via Modification Of Calcium Flux In Cancer Cells

The energy disruptor metformin targets mitochondrial integrity via modification of calcium flux in cancer cells Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:5040 (2017) Mitochondrial integrity is critical for the regulation of cellular energy and apoptosis. Metformin is an energy disruptor targeting complex I of the respiratory chain. We demonstrate that metformin induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium release from the ER and subsequent uptake of calcium into the mitochondria, thus leading to mitochondrial swelling. Metformin triggers the disorganization of the cristae and inner mitochondrial membrane in several cancer cells and tumors. Mechanistically, these alterations were found to be due to calcium entry into the mitochondria, because the swelling induced by metformin was reversed by the inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). We also demonstrated that metformin inhibits the opening of mPTP and induces mitochondrial biogenesis. Altogether, the inhibition of mPTP and the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis may account for the poor pro-apoptotic effect of metformin in cancer cells. Maintaining mitochondrial structural integrity is essential for cells to produce energy, overcome environmental stresses such as nutrient deprivation and hypoxia and respond to genotoxic agents, including chemotherapy. Consequently, the disruption of mitochondrial metabolism sensitizes cells to apoptosis and opens new therapeutic avenues in cancer treatment. Metformin is a biguanide and a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, but it is also a metabolic disruptor that specifically targets the metabolism of cancer cells 1 . Several reports have shown that this drug inhibits cancer cell growth and has antitumoral effects 2 , 3 . Biguanides inhibit the activity of the mi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of diabetes. What causes all this exhaustion and how can we get our energy back? Some studies have reported that as many as 85% of people with diabetes experience fatigue, defined as excessive tiredness that interferes with one or more life functions. As a Diabetes Self-Management reader named Donnah wrote, “Since being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, my housework suffers dramatically, I don’t do half of the things that I used to do with my child. When I do find the time and energy to do things, I am easily worn out and need to rest. I can’t even keep a job. I am on disability because of it and I hate this.” Causes of fatigue How does diabetes make you tired? • High blood sugar makes blood sticky, so it can’t get through the capillaries as easily to bring oxygen to cells. You know how you get sleepy after a big meal? High blood sugar can mean having that feeling all the time. • Insulin resistance keeps glucose out of body cells, so they don’t have fuel. • High blood sugar also causes inflammation. Remember how exhausted you get with the flu? That is, in part, inflammation. The same thing happens with poorly controlled diabetes. • Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause fatigue. • The mental stress of coping with diabetes can wear out your mind and spirit. Many other conditions besides diabetes can cause fatigue. If your sugars are under control, but you still lack energy, consider being tested for: • Sleep apnea, which causes exhaustion and is very common in diabetes. If you wake up tired, ask your doctor for a sleep test. • Anemia, or a lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin (the protein responsible for transporting oxygen) in the blood. • Low or high thyroid. • Low sex hormo Continue reading >>

Effect Of Metformin On Metabolic Improvement And Gut Microbiota

Effect Of Metformin On Metabolic Improvement And Gut Microbiota

Effect of Metformin on Metabolic Improvement and Gut Microbiota aCenter for Human and Environmental Microbiome, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea bN-Bio, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea Metformin is commonly used as the first line of medication for the treatment of metabolic syndromes, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, metformin-induced changes in the gut microbiota have been reported; however, the relationship between metformin treatment and the gut microbiota remains unclear. In this study, the composition of the gut microbiota was investigated using a mouse model of high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity with and without metformin treatment. As expected, metformin treatment improved markers of metabolic disorders, including serum glucose levels, body weight, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, Akkermansia muciniphila (12.44% 5.26%) and Clostridium cocleatum (0.10% 0.09%) abundances increased significantly after metformin treatment of mice on the HFD. The relative abundance of A. muciniphila in the fecal microbiota was also found to increase in brain heart infusion (BHI) medium supplemented with metformin in vitro. In addition to the changes in the microbiota associated with metformin treatment, when other influences were controlled for, a total of 18 KEGG metabolic pathways (including those for sphingolipid and fatty acid metabolism) were significantly upregulated in the gut microbiota during metformin treatment of mice on an HFD. Our results demonstrate that the gut microbiota and their metabolic pathways are influenced by metformin treatment. Metformin is a common antidiabetic agent in the biguanide class and is known to suppress glucose production in the liver, increase insulin sensitivity, an Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism, Metformin & Weight Loss

Hypothyroidism, Metformin & Weight Loss

Metformin, sold under the brand name Glucophage, is a diabetes drug that can improve insulin sensitivity and promote weight loss by helping lower glucose levels and prevent hunger. It works as a weight-loss aid, but may not be suitable for people with hypothyroidism because it can interact with levothyroxine -- thyroid replacement hormone -- and lead to high blood sugars. Video of the Day Your thyroid gland is located at the base of your throat, in front of your vocal chords. Part of your endocrine system, your thyroid produces T4 and T3 hormones which control the speed your body uses oxygen and energy -- your metabolism. Low thyroid function results in a slower metabolism; one of the first signs of hypothyroidism is weight gain. Other symptoms include brittle or weak nails and hair, fatigue and a sensitivity to cold. Hypothyroidism is treated with supplemental thyroid hormone; which your body can also convert to T3 hormone. Rarely do you need to supplement both hormones. Levothyroxine is the most common treatment and replaces T4 hormone, boosting metabolism Weight Loss and Hypothyroidism Until your hypothyroidism is controlled and your metabolic function returns to normal, it will be difficult for you to lose weight. It can take three months or longer to find the correct dose of levothyroxine and buildup enough thyroid hormone in your body. You can try to boost your metabolism by changing your body composition and increasing muscle mass. The more muscle tissue you have in comparison to fat, the higher your metabolism will be -- and the more calories you will burn, even at rest. Weight loss requires you to burn more calories than your consume, so that your body will break down stored fat to use for energy. Metformin and Levothyroxine Metformin decreases the amount of gl Continue reading >>

Beneficial Effects Of Metformin On Energy Metabolism And Visceral Fat Volume Through A Possible Mechanism Of Fatty Acid Oxidation In Human Subjects And Rats

Beneficial Effects Of Metformin On Energy Metabolism And Visceral Fat Volume Through A Possible Mechanism Of Fatty Acid Oxidation In Human Subjects And Rats

Beneficial effects of metformin on energy metabolism and visceral fat volume through a possible mechanism of fatty acid oxidation in human subjects and rats 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan 2Institute of Animal Experimentation, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Received 2015 Sep 11; Accepted 2017 Jan 19. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Metformin is known to have a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition, although the precise mechanism has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of metformin on energy metabolism and anthropometric factors in both human subjects and rats. In human studies, metformin (1500mg/day) was administered to 23 healthy subjects and 18 patients with type 2 diabetes for 2 weeks. Metabolic parameters and energy metabolism were measured during a meal tolerance test in the morning before and after the treatment of metformin. In animal studies, 13 weeks old SD rats were fed 2526 g of standard chow only during 12-hours dark phase with either treated by metformin (2.5mg/ml in drinking water) or not for 2 weeks, and metabolic parameters, anthropometric factors and energy metabolism together with expressions related to fat oxidation and adaptive thermogenesis were measured either in fasting or post-prandial state at 15 weeks old. Post-prandial plasma lactate concentration was significantly increased after the metfo Continue reading >>

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has Metformin Improved Your Energy And Mood? - Page 2

Has metformin improved your energy and mood? If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Hi! I'm brand new to the site. I was just diagnosed with PCOS on Monday and started Metformin the same day. I definitely have had more energy these last three days! I haven't gotten that sluggishness in the middle of the day - I've been able to keep going all day. My endocrinologist said to expect more energy. She explained that before with my insulin resistance my body just took all the food I was eating and immediately stored it away as fat, leaving my muscles with hardly anything to run on. This is why I always felt tired and like I needed to keep eating all the time for energy. So now that my body is actually using the food I eat for energy - I actually have some! My mood also feels more stable. I think this is because I'm not getting hypoglycemic (sp?) between meals. Love, love, love the metformin so far!!! Hi, I've been taking 1500mg for the last 23 days and felt better almost straightaway. I was diagnosed with PCOS in '96 but was finally diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Type II on the 6th of April (I suspected I've had it for years though, but no doctor would listen!) I no longer feel tired and unable to get out of bed in the morning. I am full of energy, have been exercising daily and feel so positive. My DH has also commented that I haven't been snappy or irritable this month. Maybe it is partly a placebo effect as I have been fighting to get on Met for years. But I wake before my alarm every morning now, with the same number of hours sleep an Continue reading >>

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