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Metformin Dosage For Weight Loss Pcos

Will Metformin Help Me Lose Weight?

Will Metformin Help Me Lose Weight?

Weight loss is an integral aspect of improving Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, in women who are overweight. Carrying extra weight can cause the condition’s symptoms to become more severe, and can even increase the level of Insulin Resistance (IR) that a woman experiences.1 IR occurs when the body’s cells become desensitized to insulin, preventing the hormone from turning glucose into energy. This results in high blood sugar and, in some cases, diabetes. For this reason, Metformin, a popular diabetes medication, is often prescribed for PCOS. Aside from regulating blood sugar levels, this pharmaceutical, also known as Glucophage, is thought to contribute to weight loss. How Metformin Encourages PCOS Weight Loss Insulin is a hormone that triggers both hunger and the production of fat cells. Therefore, by reducing insulin, women can reduce the amount of food they eat as well as the amount of fat cells that their bodies produce.2 Metformin’s primary function is to reduce insulin, so it is only natural that this medication contributes to weight loss. How Much Medication Is Necessary? Dosage is determined by several factors; healthcare professionals consider medical history, body type, and severity of symptoms when coming to the proper dosage. Metformin comes in three different sized pills: 500 mg, 850 mg, and 1,000 mg.2 Generally, individuals are prescribed between 850 and 1,000 mg two times per day, with 850 mg three times per day being the maximum amount of the medication safe to consume.2 Typically, doctors will prescribe a low dose to gauge the body’s reaction to the medication.2 If the body needs more, physicians will alter the dosage until the right amount is achieved. Because so many factors contribute to the proper dosage, many women who are prescribed d Continue reading >>

High Dose Metformin Effect On Weightloss, Androgen Levels And Thyroid Function In Obese Hypothyroid Patients With Pcos

High Dose Metformin Effect On Weightloss, Androgen Levels And Thyroid Function In Obese Hypothyroid Patients With Pcos

Endocrine Abstracts (2017) 49 EP1132 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.49.EP1132 High dose metformin effect on weightloss, androgen levels and thyroid function in obese hypothyroid patients with PCOS Aurelian-Emil Ranetti1,2 & Anca-Pati Cucu1 1Dr. Carol Davila Central University Emergency Military Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; 2Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Objective: to evaluate the effects of metformin use on weight loss, improvement of ovarian and thyroid function in obese women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Material and Methods: 30 obese (BMI 3034.99 kg/m2) hypothyroid (TSH 610 mIU/ml) women of age 2535 years old were included. The patients received appropriate levothyroxine treatment according to TSH levels and body weight. A number of 15 patients added metformin gradually increased from a starting dose of 500 mg/day to a final dose of 3000 mg/day over a period of 6 months. Baseline levels, 3 months and 6 months levels of TSH, fT4, T3, AMH, LH/FSH ratio, testosterone, along with BMI and ultrasound ovarian volume and antral follicle count were determined. No adverse events that might have led to discontinuation of the treatment were recorded. Mild nausea was registered in 8 patients after 2 weeks of treatment with 3000 mg/day of metformin, respectively softer stools (but no diarrhoea) in 5 patients in the first week of treatment (500 mg/day), but the symptoms relieved with disappearing within the mentioned time frame. Results: BMI levels decreased significantly in the first 3 months in metformin group (32.5+/-1.65 kg/m2 vs. 28.4+/ 1.95 kg/m2). BMI variation in the non met-group was smaller. BMI levels have reached a plateau after 3 months of metformin treatment. TSH levels decreased (7.2+/ 1.6 mUI/ml vs. 4.8+/2.2 mUI/ml) significant Continue reading >>

Metformin As An Initial Adjunct To Low-dose Liraglutide Enhances The Weight-decreasing Potential Of Liraglutide In Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Randomized Control Study

Metformin As An Initial Adjunct To Low-dose Liraglutide Enhances The Weight-decreasing Potential Of Liraglutide In Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Randomized Control Study

Go to: Introduction Obesity is not intrinsically associated with PCOS, yet the risk of obesity is ≥2.8-fold higher in women with PCOS, compared with women without PCOS, with an estimated prevalence of 49% (1). The quantity and distribution of fat is a major contributor to the severity of PCOS (2,3). Weight reduction in the individuals with the highest weight should be an important treatment target when PCOS is associated with obesity (4–6). However, weight-independent treatment targets that are intrinsically associated with the syndrome should also be involved in initial treatment of obese patients with PCOS. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend lifestyle modification as the first line of intervention (7) in obese patients with PCOS, although the treatment goals with lifestyle intervention are usually challenging to achieve, and non-sustainable in everyday life. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide (LIRA) at a dose of 3 mg daily was recently approved as an anti-obesity drug. Randomized placebo-controlled and active-comparator studies have demonstrated that LIRA is able to increase weight loss among overweight and obese patients in a dose-dependent manner with once-daily doses of 1.2–3.0 mg (8,9). The proportion of patients experiencing 5–10% weight loss was higher following treatment with LIRA compared with placebo and orlistat treatment (9). Higher doses of ≥3 mg daily are more effective compared with lower doses, although this increase in efficacy occurs with decreased tolerability, a higher frequency of side effects and higher costs (10). These data support the potential benefit of LIRA among overweight and obese patients with prediabetes. The efficacy of LIRA in obese women with PCOS has yet to be elucidated. A small ra Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss Success Anyone? ;)

Metformin Weight Loss Success Anyone? ;)

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I'm new to this site but not to PCOS I was diagnosed 4 years ago when I was 17 but I'm pretty sure I've always had it. I lost insurance 3 years ago and in that time I gained almost 40 pounds so now I weigh almost 170 & I'm really short 5'1 so it looks like more on my little frame I've also started having even more problems with all the PCOS symptoms. I just got insurance back, thank Jesus lol & my doctor has put me on metformin mainly for help with weight loss & other symptoms & I didn't want birth control because I DO NOT want to gain anymore weight. I took my first dose this morning 500mg and to my surprise I didn't get any of the really nasty side effects I've heard about, so I guess I'll just have to see if this continues after I up my dosage to 1000mg's a day! So I was wondering if any of you ladies had weight loss success with metformin & the low carb. diet? If so would you please share them with me, I feel it will help motivate me ! Hi there, I just started my Metformin this morning as well. I am on 500Mg my doctor wanted me to go on birthcontrol and i said no for the same reason, I am not wanting to gain weight but loose it. Unlike you i got some nasty side effects, But not that bad. so i would love to share my stories with you as soon as it actuallyt starts happening. Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Oral Contraceptives Plus Metformin for the Treatment of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Would the combination of levonorgestrel ethinyl estradiol plus metformin be effective for the treatment of patients with the polycystic ovary syndrome? Response from Robert L. Barbieri, MD The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is defined as the presence of both ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. In women with PCOS, oligo- or anovulation manifests itself as irregular cycles with oligo- or amenorrhea. Hyperandrogenism can be identified by physical examination, ie, the presence of hirsutism or by laboratory tests that demonstrate an elevated circulating concentration of a major androgen, ie, free testosterone, total testosterone, and/or androstenedione. A third criterion for the diagnosis of PCOS is to exclude other causes of hyperandrogenism, such as nonclassic adrenal hyperplasia resulting from a 21-hydroxylase defect or an androgen-producing adrenal or ovarian tumor. PCOS occurs in approximately 5% to 7% of women of reproductive age.[ 1 , 2 ] This makes PCOS the most common endocrinopathy of women. Women with PCOS have both abnormally elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion[ 3 , 4 ] and hyperinsulinemia as a result of insulin resistance.[ 5 ] The combination of hypersecretion of LH and insulin causes ovarian androgen overproduction.[ 6 ] In turn, ovarian androgen overproduction causes hirsutism and prevents normal ovarian follicle growth, preventing regular ovulation. PCOS can be treated by lowering LH hypersecretion (oral contraceptive pills or GnRH agonist analogues) or by reversing the hyperinsulinemia that is caused by insulin resistance (weight loss or metformin). An intriguing idea is to use oral contraceptives plus metformin in combination to simultaneously attack t Continue reading >>

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinological disorder affecting 4–12% of women [Diamanti-Kandarakis et al. 1999; Farah et al. 1999; Knochenhauer et al. 1998]. It has also been the most controversial medical condition and every aspect has received a lot of attention from the nomenclature to the management. Several descriptions of similar conditions took place in the 20th century and it was named Stein—Leventhal Syndrome in 1935 after the authors who described polycystic ovarian morphology in patients suffering from hirsutism, amenorrhoea and infertility [Leventhal, 1958; Stein and Leventhal, 1935]. PCOS was also called polycystic ‘ovarian’ syndrome implying that the primary pathology lies in or triggered by the ovary. Others have called it polycystic ovary disease (PCOD), which is the least used term for obvious reasons. Currently, PCOS refers to a disorder with a combination of reproductive and metabolic characteristics. This has evolved over time with controversy over the definition culminating in the latest consensus [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004] which instead of solving the issue created more controversy [Azziz et al. 2006]. In the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ESHRE/ASRM) consensus, at least two of the following features are needed to make the diagnosis; oligo/anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic features on ultrasound scan [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004]. The Androgen Excess Society, however, recommended that androgen excess should remain a constant feature of PCOS irrespective of the ovulatory status and morphological features of the ovaries [Azziz et al. 2006]. For almost three decades, PCOS has been regarded as a life course disease which besides its reproductiv Continue reading >>

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Should you take metformin -- nor not? Is there a better alternative? This page will answer your questions. It's an anti-diabetic drug sometimes used to treat PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), although it is used chiefly to help control Type 2 diabetes. This drug offers both benefits and significant risks. Free PCOS Newsletter The FDA has approved it only for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Because of this limitation, some physicians don't have much clinical experience using Glucophage to treat PCOS and don't always feel comfortable using it unless you have diabetes. 13 Side Effects of Metformin Your Doctor Didn't Tell You About Did you know that metformin has at least 13 under-recognized side effects? Some of them can be serious. Read more about the side effects. Can't Tolerate It? Try This! Medical research is now showing that there are natural alternatives to this and other drugs for treating PCOS, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. So if you're uncomfortable with the idea of taking Glucophage for years to come, or you've tried it but can't tolerate its side effects, take a look at the natural alternatives that are just as effective as metformin. Does It Reduce PCOS Symptoms? Some medical guidelines say it is not the first thing you should try for controlling PCOS. However, it may be helpful IF you have insulin resistance. Read more... Take Supplemental Vitamin B12! Recent research is showing that you will develop a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take this drug for over a year or so. A deficiency in vitamin B12 could have undesirable consequences if for fetal development if you're pregnancy or trying to become pregnant. Read more... Is It Appropriate for Girls? As girls and teenagers start to have trouble with their weight, irregular periods, early appearance of public Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – How It Works, Benefits, And Side Effects

Metformin Weight Loss – How It Works, Benefits, And Side Effects

Do you find it extremely difficult to refrain from eating all the time? Have you gained too much weight? Or did your doctor just tell you that you have polycystic ovaries? If you answered “yes” to any one of these questions, chances are your body is resistant to insulin. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, insulin resistance can lead to diabetes type 2, prediabetes, and infertility. This can take a toll on your physical and emotional health (1). To counteract these health problems, doctors often prescribe the drug Metformin. This drug has helped many to lose weight and improve insulin sensitivity, and it can definitely help you too. So, read on to find out how Metformin can help you lose weight, the dosage, side effects, and much more. What Is Metformin? Metformin is a drug that helps to control the blood glucose levels. It is a derivative of biguanide (a group of drugs that prevent the production of glucose by the liver) that helps to improve insulin sensitivity, thereby reducing the sugar levels in the blood and the risk of diabetes type 2. It also helps regulate the amount of sugar absorbed in the intestine. Metformin was first synthesized in the 1920s. But only in 1957, it was made available in the market as an effective antidiabetic drug. It is generally sold under the brand name Glucophage and is taken orally. It is taken by people who are obese and at the risk of developing diabetes type 2 and by women who have irregular periods and are at a risk of PCOs and infertility (2). So, how does Metformin aid weight loss? Find out next. Metformin And Weight Loss – How It Works ? In obese individuals, metformin acts by suppressing the production of sugar by the liver. It reduces the rate of gluconeogenesis and glycogeno Continue reading >>

Metformin And Weight Loss In Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Comparison Of Doses

Metformin And Weight Loss In Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Comparison Of Doses

Context: Metformin treatment of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is widespread, as determined by studies with diverse patient populations. No comparative examination of weight changes or metabolite responses to different doses has been reported. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether different doses of metformin (1500 or 2550 mg/ d) would have different effects on body weight, circulating hormones, markers of inflammation, and lipid profiles. Design: The study included prospective cohorts randomized to two doses of metformin. Setting: The study was performed at a university teaching hospital with patients from gynecology/endocrinology clinics. Patients: The patients studied were obese (body mass index, 30 to <37 kg/m2; n = 42) and morbidly obese (body mass index, ≥37 kg/m2; n = 41) women with PCOS. Intervention: Patients were randomized to two doses of metformin, and parameters were assessed after 4 and 8 months. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were changes in body mass, circulating hormones, markers of inflammation, and lipid profiles. Results: Intention to treat analyses showed significant weight loss in both dose groups. Only the obese subgroup showed a dose relationship (1.5 and 3.6 kg in 1500- and 2550-mg groups, respectively; P = 0.04). The morbidly obese group showed similar reductions (3.9 and 3.8 kg) in both groups. Suppression of androstenedione was significant with both metformin doses, but there was no clear dose relationship. Generally, beneficial changes in lipid profiles were not related to dose. Conclusion: Weight loss is a feature of protracted metformin therapy in obese women with PCOS, with greater weight reduction potentially achievable with higher doses. Additional studies are required to determine wh Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos Treatment - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

Metformin And Pcos Treatment - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), there's a good chance your doctor has prescribed a drug called metformin (brand name "Glucophage" or "Glucophage XR"). Metformin offers both benefits and risks. They are summarized below. We also offer some suggestions if you are now taking metformin. A small number of medical studies are mentioned in this article in order to give you some context for understanding the benefits and risks of metformin. Some of the purported benefits of metformin are controversial or unproven, and the studies cited below are not conclusive proof of benefits. Other relevant studies have not been included because of lack of space. Metformin is a drug that has been used to help control blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 Diabetes. Although metformin has been used in Europe for over 25 years, it was not available in the US until 1995. The FDA has approved metformin only for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes. Consequently, some physicians don't have much clinical experience with metformin, or are reluctant to use it unless the patient has diabetes.(1) Metformin appears to work in three ways. First, it decreases the absorption of dietary carbohydrates through the intestines. Second, it reduces the production of glucose by the liver.(2) The liver uses the raw material in your food to create a reserve supply of blood sugar. When your body experiences stress, the liver releases the reserve glucose to supply your brain and muscles with an immediate source of energy to cope with the stress. Metformin suppresses the production of this reserve fuel. Third, and perhaps most importantly, metformin increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin.(2) Insulin is the hormone that delivers glucose into your cells to be burned as fuel, or stored. Women Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pcos Symptoms: 5 Challenging Cases

Metformin For Pcos Symptoms: 5 Challenging Cases

Metformin for PCOS symptoms: 5 challenging cases Dr. Barbieri is chief of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, Mass, and Kate Macy Ladd Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School. He is editor-in-chief of OBG Management. This inexpensive and versatile drug broadens the choices for treating polycystic ovary syndrome. An expert describes its efficacy for common manifestations of PCOS. 1. Barbieri RL. Metformin for the treatment of the polycystic ovary syndrome. Obstet Gynecol. 2003;101:785-793. 2. Pugeat M, Ducluzeau PH. Insulin resistance, polycystic ovary syndrome and metformin. Drugs. 1999;58 (suppl 1):41-46. 3. Kirpichnikov D, McFarlane SI, Sowers JR. Metformin: an update. Ann Intern Med. 2002;137:25-33. 4. Knochenhauer ES, Key TJ, Kahsar-Miller M, et al. Prevalence of the polycystic ovary syndrome in unselected black and white women of the southeastern United States: a prospective study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998;83:3078-3082. 5. Diamanti-Kandarakis E, Kouli CR, Bergiele AT, et al. A survey of the polycystic ovary syndrome in the Greek island of Lesbos: hormonal and metabolic profile. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999;84:4006-4011. 6. Asuncion M, Calvo RM, San Millan JL, et al. A prospective study of the prevalence of the polycystic ovary syndrome in unselected Caucasian women from Spain. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000;85:2434-2438. 7. Arroyo A, Laughlin GA, Morales AJ, et al. Inappropriate gonadotropin secretion in polycystic ovary syndrome: influence of adiposity. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1997;82:3728-3733. 8. Taylor AE, McCourt B, Martin KA, et al. Determinants of abnormal gonadotropin secretion in clinically defined women with polycystic ovary syndrome. J Clin Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

We've been discussing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and its impact on the health of women of size. Today, let's discuss the use of metformin in the treatment of PCOS. So far we've talked about the definition and symptoms of PCOS, how it presents, its testing and diagnosis, and its possible causes. Now we are discussing common treatment protocols for the metabolic issues of PCOS, and the pros and cons of each treatment option. (Fertility treatment will be covered in a different set of posts.) Today, we discuss metformin (Glucophage). Disclaimer: While the following information is based on my best understanding of the research, I am not a medical health-care professional and no medical advice should be inferred. Always do your own research and consult your healthcare provider. Trigger Warning: Remember that the purpose of these posts is to provide a basic introduction to PCOS with a size acceptance approach that is rare on PCOS websites. However, there will be some occasional mention of weight loss in some posts because this is part of the traditional approach to treating PCOS and fair coverage demands exploring the pros and cons of all treatments. This approach has been approved by the fatosphere monitors. In this post, there is a brief mention of the weight loss properties associated with metformin in some people. Insulin-Sensitizing Agent Overview Because insulin resistance (IR) is a strong part of the PCOS profile, because IR may be an integral part of its mechanism, and because decompensation of glucose tolerance due to IR is a big part of the long-term health impact of PCOS, treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents is considered a vitally important part of PCOS treatment by most clinicians. Insulin-sensitizing agents help the body to use its own insulin more e Continue reading >>

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