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Metformin Definition

Fortamet Patient Information Including Side Effects

Fortamet Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Generic Name: metformin (Pronunciation: met FOR min) What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is the most important information I should know about metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion; swelling or rapid weight gain; or fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms. Les Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Definition Of Metformin Hydrochloride - Nci Drug Dictionary - National Cancer Institute

Definition Of Metformin Hydrochloride - Nci Drug Dictionary - National Cancer Institute

The hydrochloride salt of the biguanide metformin with antihyperglycemic and potential antineoplastic activities. Metformin inhibits complex I (NADPH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby increasing the cellular AMP to ATP ratio and leading to activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and regulating AMPK-mediated transcription of target genes. This eventually prevents hepatic gluconeogenesis, enhances insulin sensitivity and fatty acid oxidation and ultimately leads to a decrease in glucose levels. Metformin may exert antineoplastic effects through AMPK-mediated or AMPK-independent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is up-regulated in many cancer tissues. Furthermore, this agent also inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression which is mediated through the suppression of transcription activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation. Check for active clinical trials using this agent. ( NCI Thesaurus ) Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. metformin [met-for´min] Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. metformin /met·for·min/ (met-for´min) an antihyperglycemic agent that potentiates the action of insulin, used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. metformin a hypoglycemic agent that potentiates the action of insulin, used in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. metformin A biguanide antihyperglycaemic and antidiabetic used for type-2 diabetes, alone or with sulfonurea. Metformin sensitises cells to insulin, decreases serum glucose and insulin, decreases insulin resistance, increases glucose utilisation, decreases triglycerides, and reduces weight; in some patients, it suppresses appetite. Adverse effects GI tract complaints—e.g., diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, bloating—occur in 30%. Contraindications Metabolic acidosis, liver disease; metformin has an equal and additive effect with troglitazone, which acts by increased peripheral glucose disposal. metformin Glucophage® Diabetology A biguanide antihyperglycemic and antidiabetic used for type 2 DM, alone or with sulfonurea; metformin sensitizes cells to insulin, ↓ serum glucose and insulin, ↓ insulin resistance, ↑ glucose utilization, ↓ TGs, ↓ weight; in some Pts, it suppresses appetite. See Diabetes mellitus. Cf Troglitazone. metformin A biguanide oral HYPOGLYCAEMIC drug used in the treatment of MATURITY ONSET DIABETES. The drug may be dangerous to those with liver or kidney disease or a high alcohol intake. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Glucophage. metformin biguanide agent used to treat diabetes mellitus; in presen Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin? - Definition From Fertilitysmarts

What Is Metformin? - Definition From Fertilitysmarts

Metformin is an oral medication indicated to treat diabetes mellitus that is also used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and promote fertility. Metformin works to stabilize blood sugar by reducing liver glucose production, reducing intestinal glucose absorption, and increase insulin sensitivity. Unlike other diabetes medications, metformin does not cause hypoglycemia or weight gain. PCOS is an endocrine disorder classified by insulin resistance and hormone imbalance. Irregular hormone levels lead to irregular menstruation, anovulation (lack of ovulation), and infertility. Some women with PCOS also have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and endometrial hyperplasia (overly thick lining of the uterus). Metformin is effective in improving insulin sensitivity thus improving hormonal balance and restoring fertility. Metformin is usually taken twice daily. It should be taken with meals to avoid gastrointestinal side effects. Extended release tablets should be swallowed whole and are preferred to be taken with an evening meal. Common side effects include: Continue reading >>

The Use Of Metformin And The Incidence Of Lung Cancer In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Use Of Metformin And The Incidence Of Lung Cancer In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE Observational studies have associated metformin use with a decreased risk of lung cancer incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the studies had important methodological shortcomings. The objective of this study was to determine whether metformin use is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, while avoiding previous biases. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using the U.K. General Practice Research Database, we assembled a cohort of patients newly treated with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) between 1988 and 2009. A nested case–control analysis was conducted, where case subjects with lung cancer occurring during follow-up were matched with up to 10 control subjects for age, sex, calendar time, and duration of follow-up. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted rate ratios of lung cancer associated with ever use of metformin, along with measures of duration and cumulative dose. Models were adjusted for potential confounders, which included smoking. RESULTS The cohort included 115,923 new users of OHAs, with 1,061 patients diagnosed with lung cancer during follow-up (rate 2.0/1,000 person-years). Metformin use was not associated with a decreased rate of lung cancer (rate ratio 0.94 [95% CI 0.76–1.17]). No dose-response was observed by number of prescriptions received, cumulative duration of use, and dose. CONCLUSIONS Metformin use is not associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. The decreased risk reported in other observational studies is likely due to bias from methodological shortcomings. Nonetheless, greater consideration should be given to clarify inconsistencies between experimental models and population studies. Metformin, a biguanide derivative, is Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metformin - Doccheck Flexikon

Metformin - Doccheck Flexikon

Metformin ist ein zur Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus Typ 2 eingesetztes orales Antidiabetikum . Chemisch gehrt Metformin zur Klasse der Biguanid-Derivate und ist zur Zeit (2018) in Deutschland das einzige zugelassene Medikament seiner Art. Metformin hemmt den mitochondrialen Komplex 1 ( NADH-Ubichinon-Oxidoreduktase ) der Atmungskette in der Leber und fhrt durch eine Verminderung der ATP-Synthese zu einer reduzierten Energiebereitstellung zugunsten einer Steigerung der anaeroben Glykolyse . Die hierdurch induzierte Konzentrationserhhung von ADP und AMP in Hepatozyten verstrkt die Hemmung der Adenylylcyclase . Dies erfolgt durch Bindung von AMP an diep-sitedieses Enzyms, was eine verringerte Bereitstellung von cAMP fr die Glucagon-induzierte hepatische Glukoseproduktion zur Folge hat. [1] In der Folge steigt das Laktat an. Darber hinaus wird die Glukoseabgabe der Leber und die Glukoseproduktion in der Leber vermindert. Insgesamt wird durch diesen Prozess die Glukoseaufnahme peripherer Gewebe (z.B. der Skelettmuskulatur und der Fettzellen ) gesteigert. Der Blutzucker sinkt dadurch unter der Therapie mit Metformin ab. Nach oraler Gabe wird Metformin zu etwa 60% resorbiert. Nach lterer Anschauung wird Metformin im menschlichen Organismus nicht metabolisiert . [2] Neuere Untersuchungen zeigen jedoch, dass Metformin zumindest teilweise durch CYP2C11 und CYP2D1 verstoffwechselt wird. [3] Die Elimination erfolgt jedoch grten Teils unverndert durch tubulre Sekretion ber die Nieren . Die Halbwertszeit von Metformin betrgt ca. 3 Stunden. Metformin ist derzeit (2018) erste Wahl fr die medikamentse Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus Typ 2, insbesondere bei bergewichtigen Patienten. Gelingt innerhalb von 3 Monaten durch Dit und Bewegung keine ausreichende Gewichtsreduktion und Einst Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Fortamet Glucophage Glucophage XR Glumetza Riomet Descriptions Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your doctor will teach you what to do if this happens. Metformin does not help patients does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Tablet, Extended Release Solution Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Tweet Glucophage and Metformin are often mentioned in relation to diabetes treatment. But what exactly is Glucophage and how does Glucophage help control type 2 diabetes? The following guide to Glucophage should help you to understand more about this medication, its side effects and its value. What is Glucophage? Glucophage tablets (and Glucophage SR tablets) each have an active ingredient called Metformin hydrochloride. Metformin is widely used to aid in the control of blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. How does Glucophage help people with type 2 diabetes? Amongst people with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Furthermore, the cells in the body may be resistant to any insulin that is present. Normally, insulin would instruct cells to remove sugar from the blood, but in people with diabetes blood sugar levels can climb too high. As we said before, Glucophage contains the ingredient Metformin. Metformin (Metformin hydrochloride) is a type of medicine known as a biguanide. This works to lower the amount of sugar in the blood of people with diabetes. It does this by lowering the amount of sugar produced in the liver, and also increasing the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. The cells are therefore more able to remove sugar from the blood. Metformin also slows the absorption of sugars from the intestines. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels between and after meals. Who is Glucophage prescribed to? Glucophage is usually prescribed as a treatment for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese. When diet and exercise fail to adequately control blood glucose levels, Glucophage is prescribed. Sometimes, this medicine is used in conjunction with other anti-diabetic medication. How often do people Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Metformin - Definition Of Metformin By The Free Dictionary

Metformin - Definition Of Metformin By The Free Dictionary

Metformin - definition of metformin by The Free Dictionary An oral hypoglycemic drug, C4H11N5, usually used in its hydrochloride form, that decreases glucose production by the liver and increases peripheral glucose uptake, used to treat type 2 diabetes. (Pharmacology) a drug, C4H11N5, used to treat type 2 diabetes ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend: antidiabetic , antidiabetic drug - a drug used to treat diabetes mellitus Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us , add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content . 1, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Six months of adjunctive metformin therapy does not improve glycemic outcomes in overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from T1D Exchange and funded by the JDRF. New studies show metformin is indicated as a potential anticancer drug STOCKHOLM -- Clinicians might want to consider more routinely monitoring levels of vitamin Bp in their diabetic patients who are using metformin, according to data from the HOME (Hyperinsulinaemia: The Outcome of Its Metabolic Effects) randomized controlled trial, which showed that [B. WCMC-Q research study published in UK journal Experiments carried out by researchers in the laboratory of WCMC-Q's Dr Chris Triggle demonstrate that metformin, the first-choice hypoglycemic drug prescribed to most type-2 diabetes sufferers, interacts with the so-called 'longevity gene' SIRT1 to protect the user's vascular system against deterioration caused by glucose toxicity. All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, cons Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin? - Definition, Classification & Uses

What Is Metformin? - Definition, Classification & Uses

Metformin is a medication used for type 2 diabetes and two other conditions that benefit from lowering blood sugars. You can learn more about this widely used antidiabetic drug in this lesson. What Is Metformin? Minnie just found out she has diabetes. She is upset because she believes people with diabetes cannot eat any 'white' foods. Buttery mashed potatoes with hot sausage gravy are one of Minnie's favorite indulgences. In addition, her doctor started her on a medication to help manage her type 2 diabetes. Minnie is afraid she won't be able to eat her favorite foods, and the new pill will make her gain weight. As her nurse, you try to ease some of Minnie's fears. You first tell her that she can still have her favorite foods if she eats small amounts and takes her medication called metformin. Metformin is an anti-diabetic medication that reduces the amount of blood sugar (glucose) the liver releases and helps muscles use glucose more effectively. How Does Metformin Work? You begin helping Minnie understand how metformin works by telling her about type 2 diabetes. People use sugar (glucose) for energy. Glucose travels through our bodies in the blood. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin that allows glucose to travel from the blood into the muscles and organs. If we go a long time without eating and our blood sugar drops, our livers release stored glucose to help with our energy needs. Diabetes results when this carefully balanced system does not work well. Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) happens when we have too little insulin from our pancreas, and the insulin we have is unable to work effectively, which is called insulin resistance. This makes our blood glucose rise to harmful levels. With type 2 diabetes, our liver may release too much glucose, causing Continue reading >>

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