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Metformin Dark Urine

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-250 mg-MYL round, white, imprinted with G31, M What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin? Do not use glipizide and metformin if you have congestive heart failure or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is glipizide and metformin? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthca Continue reading >>

Glyburide/metformin Tablet - Oral

Glyburide/metformin Tablet - Oral

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs. (GLEYE-byou-ride/met-FOR-min) COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Glucovance WARNING: Metformin can rarely cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Stop taking this medication and seek immediate medical attention if you develop any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: unusual tiredness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, unusually slow/irregular heartbeat. Lactic acidosis is more likely to occur in patients who have certain medical conditions, including kidney or liver disease, conditions that may cause a low oxygen blood level or poor circulation (e.g., severe congestive heart failure, recent heart attack, recent stroke), heavy alcohol use, a severe loss of body fluids (dehydration), X-ray or scanning procedures that require an injectable iodinated contrast drug, recent surgery, or a serious infection. Tell your doctor immediately if any of these conditions occur or if you notice a big change in your overall health. You may need to stop taking metformin temporarily. The elderly are also at higher risk, especially those older than 80 years who have not had kidney tests. (See also Side Effects and Precautions sections.) USES: This anti-diabetic medication is a combination of 2 drugs (glyburide and metformin). It is used along with a diet and exercise progr Continue reading >>

Competact (metformin And Pioglitazone)

Competact (metformin And Pioglitazone)

Competact tablets contain two active ingredients, metformin hydrochloride and pioglitazone hydrochloride. These are both medicines used to help control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Competact is licensed for use in people with type 2 diabetes, particularly overweight people, whose blood sugar is not controlled by the maximum tolerated dose of metformin alone. Competact tablets contain two active ingredients, metformin hydrochloride and pioglitazone hydrochloride. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine known as a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to decrease the amount of sugar in the blood. Firstly, it reduces the amount of sugar produced by cells in the liver. Secondly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Finally, it also delays absorption of sugar from the intestines into the bloodstream after eating. Pioglitazone is a type of antidiabetic medicine known as a thiazolidinedione or glitazone. It helps to control blood sugar levels by increasing the sensitivity of liver, fat and muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Pioglitazone also reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver, and preserves the functioning of the cells in the pancreas (beta cells) that produce insulin. This combination of medicines helps control blood sugar levels both directly after meals and between meals. One Competact tablet should be taken twice a day (morning and evening) regularly every day. The tablets can be taken either with or without food, but if you find they upset your stomach this can be minimised by taking the tablets with or just after food. Swallow them with a drink of water. I Continue reading >>

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

A while back, I wrote about how dapagliflozin revolutionised my glucose control. Almost overnight, I changed from a morbid and morbidly obese failing diabetic to a nearly new fifty-something with a rejuvenated lust for life. My HbA1c returned to normal levels and my retinopathy disappeared. I was advised to stop taking gliclazide as my glucose control seemed to be perfect, and I didn’t want to experience hypoglycaemia. I even stopped pricking my finger to measure my blood sugar. I felt my diabetes was behind me. I had also discovered a low-carb diet I could live with: bacon and eggs, kebabs, lamb chops and steaks with mustard, hummus and delicious cheeses, all accompanied by lots of salads in mayonnaise, and non-starchy veggies. Yumm! I lost three stone effortlessly. It became embarrassing how many people remarked on how well I looked, having been a sickly fat blighter for all the time before. I felt strong enough to take on a big project helping to plan and implement the regeneration of healthcare in my very rural locale. It involved lots of travelling to meet the public and speak frankly to them while thinking on my feet. I attended endless meetings and video conferences where I had to learn the tiresome new lingo of management-speak. All of this was done alongside my day and night job as a resident consultant in intensive care and anaesthesia. Before even six months were up, I began to feel a bit flakey. My memory and concentration were not good. I was having difficulty keeping up with the meetings. I was prone to emotional lability, most noticeably at home, and, most worrying of all, I was drinking too much alcohol to get to sleep. And then I noticed the smells of scrumpy and pear drops in my breath, sweat and urine. Not everyone can detect these smells. My blood Continue reading >>

Dark Urine And Odd Odor

Dark Urine And Odd Odor

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I would like to ask about the dark urine and the odor that goes with it. I asked the Doctor and he told me as a D the PH of my urine has changed. The odor is not going to hurt me HOWEVER it does hurt me I am so concerned about it that I am avoiding being to close to people. Showering 6 times a day. It is even worse when I stay in the Travel Trailer. Anyone know how best to deal with this? I am just clueless as to how to change it. It is something in my diet or does it happen to all the women? I pretty much think you need a new doctor and quickly. Never heard of such a thing. Diabetes unchecked can lead to dark urine and a little pungent... but any pain is due to an infection and I would seek medical assistance for that. Unchecked diabetics are always thirsty as our bodies want to help flush away the excess sugars... the excess sugars and chemicals (read PH levels) are the reasons why the darker colour and the pungent smell. An old trick when you think your numbers are going to be high is to down a cold glass of water and that helps lower you numbers a bit and the result is darker pee and that smell again. Cant say that the smell lingers though... can you really smell it throughout the day or perhaps the embarrasement you might be feeling is making you imagine it somewhat. Either way go back and ask your Doctor again and also get a urine test done to check for any bladder infections. My bladder infection (in December) put me in AE and that is how they discovered I was a type 2. Can you describe the odor? A strong ammonia like smell is indicative of a UTI (or bladder infection) - a bacterial or Continue reading >>

Pioglitazone And Metformin Tablets

Pioglitazone And Metformin Tablets

Generic Name: Pioglitazone and Metformin Tablets (PYE oh GLI ta zone/met FOR min) Brand Name: Actoplus Met Warning This medicine may cause or make heart failure worse in some people. Tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure. Do not take this drug if you have moderate to very bad heart failure or if you have any signs of heart failure. You will be watched closely for signs of heart failure when you start this medicine (pioglitazone and metformin tablets) and if your dose is raised. Call your doctor right away if you have swelling in the arms or legs, shortness of breath or trouble breathing, sudden weight gain or weight gain that is not normal, or are feeling very tired. Talk with your doctor. Rarely, metformin may cause an acid health problem in the blood (lactic acidosis). The risk of lactic acidosis is higher in people with kidney problems and in people who take certain other drugs like topiramate. The risk is also higher in people with liver problems or heart failure, in older people (65 or older), or with alcohol use. If lactic acidosis happens, it can lead to other health problems and can be deadly. Lab tests to check the kidneys may be done while taking this medicine. Talk with the doctor. Do not take this medicine (pioglitazone and metformin tablets) if you have a very bad infection, low oxygen, or a lot of fluid loss (dehydration). If you have liver disease, talk with your doctor. Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol. If you are having an exam or test with contrast or have had one within the past 48 hours, talk with your doctor. Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of too much lactic acid in the blood (l Continue reading >>

Dark Urine

Dark Urine

I noticed that my urine was much darker than usual this evening - like iced tea. It was normal this morning and this afternoon. I had four cups of leafy green salad for dinner containing almost two cups of red Swiss chard. The veins in this bunch of chard were especially thick, red, and juicy. Then, after dinner, I cleaned the windows of my wife's car and drenched my T-shirt in sweat. I only remember having one 12 ounce glass of water since 3 PM, so I'm hoping it's just a combination of dehydration and pigments from the chard. Will keep an eye on it before I go to bed and tomorrow morning. Can red Swiss chard affect your urine color? I know that beets and rhubarb can. Dx: Type 2 in 04/2016; Diet induced oxalate kidney stones in 12/2016 A1c: 6.9 in 2/2018; 6.1 in 7/2017; 6.0 in 2/2017; 6.1 in 11/2016; 6.2 in 08/2016; 11.5 in 04/2016 D.D. Family Getting much harder to control D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 Sounds like dehydration to me but always a good idea to keep an eye on things anyway. I noticed that my urine was much darker than usual this evening - like iced tea. It was normal this morning and this afternoon. I had four cups of leafy green salad for dinner containing almost two cups of red Swiss chard. The veins in this bunch of chard were especially thick, red, and juicy. Then, after dinner, I cleaned the windows of my wife's car and drenched my T-shirt in sweat. I only remember having one 12 ounce glass of water since 3 PM, so I'm hoping it's just a combination of dehydration and pigments from the chard. Will keep an eye on it before I go to bed and tomorrow morning. Can red Swiss chard affect your urine color? I know that beets and rhubarb can. Well, since eating a little asparagus can make your pee smell like bog water, I wouldn't rule it out! But Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pioglitazone

Metformin And Pioglitazone

oblong, white, imprinted with 4833M, 15/500 oblong, white, imprinted with 4833M, 15/850 What is the most important information I should know about metformin and pioglitazone? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or pioglitazone (Actos), or if you have kidney problems, severe heart failure, active bladder cancer, or metabolic acidosis. Do not use metformin and pioglitazone if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Do not take this medicine for longer than recommended. Taking pioglitazone for longer than 1 year (12 months) may increase your risk of developing bladder cancer. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk. If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and pioglitazone. Before taking metformin and pioglitazone, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure or heart disease, a history of bladder cancer, a history of heart attack or stroke, liver disease, eye problems caused by diabetes, or if you are 80 years or older. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Metformin and pioglitazone is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin and pioglitazone is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 Continue reading >>

Metformin / Saxagliptin Side Effects

Metformin / Saxagliptin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin / saxagliptin: oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin / saxagliptin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin / saxagliptin: More common Anxiety bladder pain bloody or cloudy urine blurred vision body aches or pain chills cold sweats confusion cool, pale skin cough depression difficult, burning, or painful urination difficulty with breathing dizziness ear congestion fast heartbeat fever frequent urge to urinate headache increased hunger loss of voice lower back or side pain nasal congestion nausea nightmares runny nose seizures shakiness slurred speech sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Cough or hoarseness Incidence not known Black, tarry stools bleeding gums blood in the urine or stools constipation darkened urine difficulty with swallowing hives or skin rash indigestion large, hard skin blisters large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs loss of appetite pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back pinpoint red spots on the skin puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue tightness in the chest unusual bleeding or bruising vomiting yellow eyes or skin Some side effects of metformin / saxagliptin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Alogliptin-metformin Side Effects

Alogliptin-metformin Side Effects

Alogliptin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Alogliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Alogliptin and metformin is a combination medicine used with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Alogliptin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to alogliptin or metformin, or if you have: severe kidney disease; or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Some people taking alogliptin and metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if you are dehydrated, or if you drink large amounts of alcohol. Talk with your doctor about your risk. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: kidney disease; heart disease; liver disease; a history of pancreatitis; gallstones; a history of alcoholism; or if you are over 80 years old and have not recently had your kidney fun Continue reading >>

Rosiglitazone And Metformin (oral Route)

Rosiglitazone And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Call your doctor right away if you have chest pain or discomfort, nausea, pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck, shortness of breath, sweating, or vomiting. These may be symptoms of a heart attack. If you are rapidly gaining weight or having shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort, extreme tiredness or weakness, irregular breathing, irregular heartbeat, or excessive swelling of the hands, wrist, ankles, or feet, check with your doctor right away. These may be symptoms of a heart problem or edema (fluid retention). Let your doctor or dentist know you are taking this medicine. Your doctor may advise you to stop taking this medicine before you have major surgery or diagnostic tests, especially tests that use a contrast dye. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and appear quickly. Lactic acidosis usually occurs when other serious health problems are present, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include: abdominal or stomach discomfort, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fast or shallow breathing, a general feeling of discomfort, muscle pain or cramping, and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have more than one of these symptoms together, you should get immediate emergency medical help. If you have abdominal or stomach pain, dark urine, a loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, unusual tiredness or weakness, or yellow eyes or skin, check with your doctor right awa Continue reading >>

Glucovance Side Effects Center

Glucovance Side Effects Center

Glucovance (glyburide and metformin HC1) is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. Glucovance is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glucovance is available in generic form. Common side effects of Glucovance include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, diarrhea, weight gain, cold symptoms (sneezing, runny nose, cough), headache, or dizziness. Dosage of Glucovance is individualized based on both effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose should not exceed 20 mg glyburide/2000 mg metformin. Drugs that can raise blood sugar such as isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills, hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies can lead to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) when taken with Glucovance. Drugs that lower blood sugar such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid may lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when taken with Glucovance. Other medications that may interfere with Glucovance include ciprofloxacin, furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or vancomycin. During pregnancy, Glucovance should be used only when prescribed. If you are using this medication during your pregnancy, your doctor may switch you to insulin at least 2 weeks before the expected delivery date because of the risk of low blood sugar in your newborn. This drug passes into breast milk in small amounts. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Glucovanc Continue reading >>

Alogliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Alogliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Pronunciation: al-oh-GLIP-tin BEN-zoe-ate, met-FOR-min hye-droe-KLOR-ide Brand Names: Kazano Dosage Forms: Tablet Warnings: Oral route(Tablet) Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious complication of metformin accumulation. The risk increases with conditions such as sepsis, dehydration, excess alcohol intake, hepatic impairment, renal impairment, and acute congestive heart failure. Symptoms include malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, increasing somnolence, and nonspecific abdominal distress. Laboratory abnormalities include low pH, elevated blood lactate, and increased anion gap. Discontinue therapy and hospitalize patient immediately for suspected lactic acidosis . Classifications: Therapeutic Antidiabetic Pharmacologic Alogliptin Chemical Metformin Uses of This Medicine: Alogliptin and metformin combination may be used alone or together with other medicines and with a proper diet and exercise to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. Alogliptin helps to control blood sugar levels by increasing substances in the body that make the pancreas release more insulin. It also signals the liver to stop producing sugar (glucose) when there is too much sugar in the blood. Metformin reduces the absorption of sugar from the stomach, reduces the release of stored sugar from the liver, and helps your body use sugar better. This medicine does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. Before Using This Medicine: In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered: Allergies Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusu Continue reading >>

Metformin-induced Hepatitis; Paliperidone-related Peripheral Edema; Vasospastic Angina Induced By Oral Capecitabine; Skin Hyperpigmentation Due To Long-term Voriconazole Therapy; Vaccine-associated Measles

Metformin-induced Hepatitis; Paliperidone-related Peripheral Edema; Vasospastic Angina Induced By Oral Capecitabine; Skin Hyperpigmentation Due To Long-term Voriconazole Therapy; Vaccine-associated Measles

Go to: Abstract The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: [email protected]). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. Go to: Metformin-Induced Hepatitis A 41-year-old male presented to his physician with jaundice, fatigue, dark urine, and stool discoloration. The patient reported that his fatigue and yellow sclera had begun approximately 4 days prior to his seeking medical attention. He had stopped his medication based on those symptoms. Four weeks earlier, the patient had been diagnosed with diabetes with a fasting blood glucose of 274 mg/dL (normal range, 65-110 mg/dL), an HbA1c of 11.8% (normal range, 4%-5.9%), and no GAD2 antibodies. Four weeks earlier, the patient’s liver transaminases were normal. The patient’s medication regimen was metformin 500 mg 3 times daily and insulin glargine. The patient’s physical exam was unremarkable except for jaundice. His clinical labs revealed the following: total bilirubin 18.1 mg/dL (normal range, 0.3-1 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase 419 IU/L (normal range, <35 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase 863 IU/L (normal range, 10-35 IU/L), alkaline phosphatase 479 IU/L (normal Continue reading >>

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