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Metformin Colonoscopy

Tablet Prep | Osmoprep Colonoscopy Preparation Instructions

Tablet Prep | Osmoprep Colonoscopy Preparation Instructions

Tablet Prep | Osmoprep Colonoscopy Preparation Instructions PLEASE MAKE SURE TO REVIEW THESE INSTRUCTIONS A WEEK BEFORE YOUR PROCEDURE! Make sure to arrange for an escort for the day of the procedure. Discuss with Dr Gutman and your cardiologist any blood thinners you are on including Plavix, Ticlid, Effient, Coumadin, Warfarin and Lovenox. You may stay on aspirin therapy up to 325mg daily. Discuss the use of arthritis and pain medications with Dr. Gutman. Avoid arthritis medications for 2 days before the test. These include naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), ibuprofen (Motrin, Nuprin) and many others. Mobic, Celebrex, and acetaminophen (Tylenol) do not need to be discontinued. Avoid over the counter blood thinners such as Vitamin E and gingko biloba. Stop binding medications one week before including iron, multiple vitamins with iron, cholestyramine, colestid, Questran, Imodium, and Lomotil. All other prescription medications are permitted, except if specifically instructed. Avoid foods with seeds for 3 days before the colonoscopy. Seeds tend to stay in the colon for days. Pick up the prescription for Osmoprep 32 Tablets If you have diabetes, do not take your insulin or diabetic pills on the day of the test. Please advise the nurse to check the blood sugar before the test. On the day before colonoscopy diabetics do not take metformin as it may cause side effects whenyou are dehydrated due to the laxatives. This is not a concern with upper endoscopy of the stomach. Diabetics still need calories. On the day of preparation for colonoscopy, you should have non dietetic items. If you have only sugar free products you may become faint, or pass out. Do not take fast acting insulin such as Novolog. It is ok to take Lantus and similar long acting insulin. Be sure to check your blood Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

A gastroenterologist is a specialist in the digestive system. Gastroenterologists complete four years of medical school and three years of internal medicine residency, followed by a fellowship in gastroenterology. The rigorous fellowship takes two to four years to complete and ensures the physician is uniquely and highly qualified to diagnose and treat disorders of the digestive tract. The digestive system includes the 25-foot-long tube that processes food and nutrients, plus the liver, pancreas and gallbladder. These organs break down and absorb the food we eat so that the nutrients can be transported into the blood stream and delivered to cells throughout the body. Do I need a referral to schedule an appointment? Your insurance may require a referral before your visit. Contact them to learn if this is necessary. You can call one of our offices to make your appointment or your primary care physician may schedule one for you. Depending on which office you would like to be scheduled at please call: Our hours are 8:00 am 5:00 pm, Monday Friday What should I bring to my first appointment? Bring a completed health history questionnaire (if one was mailed to you), a list of medications (including dose), and your insurance card. You should also bring cash, a check, or credit card to cover any visit co-payments. The amount of time varies depending on the type and complexity of your problem. We value your time and try to run on time, but unexpected events sometimes cause delay. 21 Clark Way, Route 108, Somersworth, NH 03878 330 Borthwick Avenue, Suite 311, Portsmouth, NH 03801 55 High St., Suite 202, Hampton, NH 03842 Notethis information is intended as general guidance to help inform patients about this subject. Because of the large number of insurance plans we work with, it Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How To Prepare For A Colonoscopy - Topic Overview

Diabetes: How To Prepare For A Colonoscopy - Topic Overview

A colonoscopy is a test that lets a doctor look inside your colon. The doctor uses a thin, lighted tube called a colonoscope to look for small growths (called polyps ), cancer, and other problems like bleeding. During the test, the doctor can take samples of tissue that can be checked for cancer or other problems. This is called a biopsy. A colonoscopy also lets the doctor take out polyps. Before the test, you will need to stop eating solid foods. You also will drink a liquid or take a tablet that cleans out your colon. This will help your doctor to be able to see inside your colon during the test. When you make your appointment for the colonoscopy, mention that you have diabetes. Ask for any special instructions. Request an early morning appointment so you can get back as soon as possible to your normal routine for eating and taking medicines. The doctor doing your colonoscopy (gastroenterologist) will want to know about all the medicines you take. Be sure to also tell him or her about any vitamins, supplements, and herbal remedies you take. It's a good idea to have a list of all your medicines when you make your appointment. If you take blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or aspirin, your doctor will tell you if and when you should stop taking these medicines before your test. Talk with your diabetes doctor about how best to manage your blood sugar before and after the test. Arrange to stay home on the day of the test. When you use the liquid or pills to clean out your colon, you will go to the bathroom a lot. You'll get detailed instructions from the doctor on how to use the medicines (colon prep). Discuss with your doctor the different types of medicines. You may need a type that is safest for people with kidney problems. Stop drinking Continue reading >>

Moviprep - Gastroenterologist In Orlando, Fl

Moviprep - Gastroenterologist In Orlando, Fl

Colonoscopy, an examination of the colon (large intestine) with a lighted flexible scope. During the colonoscopy, if an abnormality is seen, it is usually biopsied at that time. This involves removing a portion or all of the abnormal area for processing and subsequent examination under a microscope. The key to accurate diagnosis of your problem is proper preparation. The bowel needs to be flushed completely free of waste material that might hide an abnormality. The thoroughness of this cleaning DEPENDS ON YOU. Without your cooperation, the examination cannot accomplish its purpose and may have to be repeated. Other Medications:Take your usual prescription medications (except iron or blood thinners as noted below). If you have a history of a heart valve or valve surgery or need antibiotics before surgery, please notify us. Blood Thinners:If you are taking blood thinners,(Warfarin, Coumadin, Plavix)please contact our office and your primary physician for specific instructions at least one week prior to the colonoscopy. ONLY STOP THESE MEDICATIONS IF YOU HAVE BEEN AUTHORIZED BY OUR DOCTOR OR YOUR CARDIOLOGIST.Aspirin is usually stopped one week before the colonoscopy. Start a Clear Liquid Diet when you get up and continue all day. Soups: Clear bouillon, chicken broth, vegetable broth, beef broth, or consomm. Beverages: Tea, coffee, Kool-Aid, carbonated beverages, Gatorade. You may add sugar to coffee and tea but not milk or creamer (non-dairy creamers are okay). Juices:Cranberry, apple, grape, strained lemonade, limeade, and orange drink. Any juice that you can see through and has no pulp is acceptable. Dessert: Italian ices, popsicles, Jell-O and hard candy. Do not drink RED colored beverages or eat RED Jell-O. Throughout the day, make sure to drink at least eight glasse Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Type-2 Diabetes And Use Of Metformin With Risk Of Colorectal Adenoma In An American Population Receiving Colonoscopy

Relationship Between Type-2 Diabetes And Use Of Metformin With Risk Of Colorectal Adenoma In An American Population Receiving Colonoscopy

Get rights and content The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between type-2 diabetes, its treatments (Use of metformin) and the development of colorectal adenoma. Colonoscopy reports from a total of 66 endoscopists in one big hospital in midwest during 20082009 were reviewed. Colonoscopy findings including quality of preparation, polyp size, location, morphology, pathology and history of diabetes and metformin treatment were retrieved. Of the 7382 colonoscopy reports were reviewed, 3465 average risk patients were included in our final analysis. The pathologically proven Adenoma detection rate (ADR) in total population was 24.6 % (30.2% in Men and 19.2% in Women). Old age and male sex were significantly associated with increasing risk of colorectal adenoma. Type-2 diabetes was associated increased risk of colorectal adenoma (OD 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.081.70, p=0.009). A total of 426 subjects (12.29%) had diabetes and 405 of these subjects (11.7%) had type-2 diabetes. Within diabetic patient group, people who were taking metformin have significantly lower risk of colorectal adenoma (OD 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.340.87, p=0.011). Diabetic subjects have increased risk of developing colorectal adenoma. Our study also supports the beneficial effect of metformin in development of colorectal adenoma. Continue reading >>

Large Volume Bowel Prep And Colonoscopy Preparation

Large Volume Bowel Prep And Colonoscopy Preparation

Large Volume Bowel Prep and Colonoscopy Preparation A colonoscopy is the most accurate test for detecting colon polyps and colon cancer, and the only test where polyps can be removed. During this procedure, a doctor examines the lining of your large intestine and rectum through a flexible tube called a colonoscope. The colonoscope is inserted into the anus and advanced slowly through the colon. If polyps or other abnormalities are found, the doctor may remove them for further examination or biopsy. The bowel prep is the most important factor in ensuring you get the most thorough and complete exam during your colonoscopy. Small polyps can be missed if they are covered with retained stool. If your bowel prep is incomplete, your exam may need to be repeated on another day or you may need to return sooner for your next colonoscopy. If you have diabetes, ask your regular doctor for diet and medication restrictions. Do not take your oral diabetes medicine on the day of your procedure. If you take metformin, stop taking it the day before your colonoscopy. Also, please bring your Insulin and Insulin syringes with you to your procedure; we will check your blood sugar before and after the procedure. If you take a medication to thin your blood Do NOT stop taking your daily Aspirin or NSAIDs. If you are taking a daily Aspirin or NSAIDS we want you to continue to take your medication. On the day of your procedure you can make your gastroenterologist aware of the medication you are taking and the amount you are taking. If you take a medication to thin your blood (such as Coumadin, Plavix, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Xarelto, Eliquis, Brilinta, Effient, Ticlid, Disgren, Pletal) you must be seen in our office (can be seen by nurse practitioner or physician assistant) prior to your procedure. At Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Be Taken Before Or After A Colonoscopy? - Page 5

Can Metformin Be Taken Before Or After A Colonoscopy? - Page 5

I was instructed not to take my meds, though I was just on ... "I had to fast for 24 hours before a colonoscopy. Clear liquids only plus some ... purging. The clinic was pretty organized about it. Once she knew I am diabetic, the scheduler said she would call me back. She got out the diabetes instructions and we went from there. There were plenty of precautions because it's an invasive test. The clinic insisted on a morning test with the specialist who knew about testing diabetics. I was instructed not to take my meds, though I was just on read more... Metformin at the time. We discussed the types of clear liquids that would work best for me. On testing day they tested my glucose levels before and after the test. I had a Propel bottle with me to drink as needed, and they would have given me anything I needed IV while I was out. My level was down to 85 after I got home. I was pretty inactive and loopy from the...Valium? ...for the next 24 hours. I couldn't eat much and was sore but my levels stayed above 100 most of the time. I took my 500mg metformin by noon the day of my test. The clinic called me twice after I was home. I guess that's standard for everyone tested. Anyway I guess the best thing was the clinic had a set of instructions and procedures for diabetics. The support staff didn't know much about diabetes but they kept the sheet around and kept on track. The doctor and anesthesiologist seemed to know what they were doing and made sure the staff had information. `" Continue reading >>

Metformin May Lower The Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Metformin May Lower The Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Home / Specialties / Oncology / Metformin May Lower the Risk of Colorectal Cancer Metformin May Lower the Risk of Colorectal Cancer Treatment found to reduce incidence of adenomas in patients with seemingly dose-dependent effect. Metformin is among the most common drugs prescribed to type 2 diabetes patients. It has numerous positive effects for patients, including decreased blood sugar without risk of hypoglycemia and facilitation of weight gain. Recent research reinforces the notion that metformin may have other benefits, such as helping to prevent certain cancers. The potential for metformin to lower the risk of colorectal cancer has previously been studied. Colorectal cancers mostly stem from pre-cancerous adenomas. This retrospective cohort study was designed to see if metformin lowers the incidence of these precursors to colorectal cancer and thus the risk of colorectal cancer itself. The study included more than 2,000 patients. The patients were between the ages of 40 and 89 years old and all had type 2 diabetes mellitus. All study participants also had at least one colorectal adenoma identified at baseline colonoscopy, and at least one colorectal adenoma remaining through repeat colonoscopy up to 10 years from the baseline colonoscopy diagnosis of adenoma. Patients were followed for a median of 4.5 years. Overall, 1,117 patients were found to have at least one adenoma during repeat colonoscopy after the baseline adenoma was found. Patients not receiving diabetes medications (n = 1,578) had a higher incidence of adenoma recurrence than metformin-only patients (n = 457). Furthermore, the association between lower adenoma incidence and metformin use was improved with higher doses of metformin. The association was ascertained via Cox models. The researchers found t Continue reading >>

Colonoscopy Prep?

Colonoscopy Prep?

Its that time again, I need a colonoscopy, only this time I'm diabetic. Is there a special prep drink for us, and is it worse or better, than the one that made me throw-up 8 years ago? It was THE WORST PART of the entire procedure, drinking that horrible drink! I had my first colonoscopy last year and was worried about what to eat during the prep since it was so dramatically different than what I normally eat. In the end (no pun intended) it doesn't really matter since it's only a few days. The stress of the prep and procedure are going to play havoc with your glucose and there's not much you can do about it. A couple of days of wonky blood sugars won't hurt you in the long run. Good luck! Yes, the drink (and hanging out in the bathroom for days) is much worse than the actual colonoscopy! A few months back I had my first one done. They gave me something called movi-prep. Instructions said to make it up and chill it. I got through the entire amount without any side issues. I found that the 8 ounce glass went down easier if I just gulped it down as fast as I could. As long as they know that you are diabetic and which meds you may be taking they can reccomend what to do. In my case it was nothing but broth 72 hours before and then nothing but water and the special liquid for the last 24. Check with your doctor to see what he wants you to do with your meds. Make no small plans. Dream no small dreams. -George Ellery Hale HbA1c 3/10/11 17; 5/4/11 8.9; 7/22/11 5.8, 9/28/11 5.6, 3/2/12 5.3, 2/26/14 5.6, 7/23/14 5.3 I have had two in the last 10 years, nothing special. I asked them to schedule mine at 0600. I fasted about 12 hours before the last one. No meds the night before. BG was not an issue. 50 units Lantus half in the morning, half at bed time (started at 80), sliding sc Continue reading >>

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

How do I manage diabetes when fasting for a blood test or a colonoscopy? I had to skip my colonoscopy last year because of low blood sugar. And now I have to have a cholesterol test. What do I do? Continue reading >>

Inhibitory Effect Of Metformin Therapy On The Incidence Of Colorectal Advanced Adenomas In Patients With Diabetes

Inhibitory Effect Of Metformin Therapy On The Incidence Of Colorectal Advanced Adenomas In Patients With Diabetes

Inhibitory Effect of Metformin Therapy on the Incidence of Colorectal Advanced Adenomas in Patients With Diabetes Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Choenan, Korea. Correspondence to Jeong Eun Shin, Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, 201 Manghyang-ro, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan 330-715, Korea. Tel: +82-41-556-3052, Fax: +82-41-556-3256, [email protected] Received 2014 Sep 1; Revised 2014 Oct 10; Accepted 2014 Oct 10. Copyright 2015. Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. All rights reserved. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Metformin use has been associated with decreased colorectal cancer risk and mortality among diabetic patients. Recent research suggests that metformin use may decrease the incidence of colorectal adenomas in diabetic patients with previous colorectal cancer. This study aimed to assess the clinical effect of metformin use on the development of colorectal adenomas in diabetic patients without previous colorectal cancer. Among 604 consecutive diabetic patients who underwent colonoscopic surveillance after initial colonoscopy between January 2002 and June 2012, 240 patients without previous colorectal cancer were enrolled in this study and were divided in two groups: 151 patients receiving metformin and 89 patients not receiving metformin. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics as well as the colorectal adenoma incidence rate were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence rate of Continue reading >>

Not A Bad Colonoscopy Prep | Diabetic Connect

Not A Bad Colonoscopy Prep | Diabetic Connect

By Nonna2Three Latest Reply2016-04-25 13:01:52 -0500 I had my "50" screening colonoscopy yesterday and all went well. Barring any unforeseen medical issued I am good for another 10 years. After a clear liquid diet the day of prep I was so hungry for real food that even though I was still groggy on the way home I had Hubby stop and get me a cheeseburger from a local burger shop. I remember folding the bag around the cheeseburger and cradling it to my abdomen and Hubby telling me I could go ahead and eat it in the car. But I still has sense enough to know that "special"sauce they use would drip and so I saved it till I got home. I felt as if that was the best cheeseburger I have ever had, but I know they are always good. Got home, ate my burger (thought about licking the extra sauce off the wrapper, but didn't), curled up on the sofa and slept until Hubby woke me yesterday evening to ask me if I wanted some pizza. Ate a slice and a half and crashed out again. I knew I would do that, anesthesia, or even just the twilight sleep stuff they gave me yesterday, will do that to me. I am glad I went ahead and followed through. I am well past the "50" and I have had this screening scheduled twice in the past three years but I got cold feet and cancelled both times. I had a colonoscopy back in the 80's when doctors were trying to figure out what was causing abdominal pain (turns out it was 63 gall stones and a bad gall bladder, but that's another story). Anyway, I had a very hard time with the prep-day liquid back then. It was a gallon, it had to be room temp and it was a slightly thick salty liquid with no discernible flavor other than salty (unless yuck is considered a flavor). I truly struggled to get it down and gagged and puked through the last half. This time my doctor presc Continue reading >>

Surviving Colonoscopy Prep

Surviving Colonoscopy Prep

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have my first colonoscopy coming up in about a month. I received some literature regarding the 24 hour prep (clear liquid diet). My question is how in the world do I keep my BG under control that day with no food (except jello, which will have to be SF) allowed? Any suggestions? The doctor's office doesn't have any specific info (big surprise). Make sure you are first up on the day of the colonoscopy. If you let them know you are diabetic, they should be good about scheduling you early to avoid sugar complications. As for the prep day, test often and have some non-red juice handy to keep your levels up if you need it. Good luck & get good pictures... My mom is 77 and we had to take her in for a Colonoscopy and Endoscopy. Call the test center that is doing the colonoscopy and tell them you are diabetic, they will be able to inform you. Make sure you take a list of all your medicines and you might want to fax them a list prior to getting their. Let them know of any other conditions you might have. You are supposed to have an interview with the doctor doing the colonoscopy prior to setting up an appoint, let him/her know any conditions you have, surgeries, and what meds you are taking and your concerns. Also make sure they give you a pillow or your family requests one while you are comming out of the sedation. My mom had the worst neck strain for 4 days because she was just lying there with no pillow for about 3 -4 hrs after the test while she came out of sedation From what I remember she just fasted for 12hrs and took her prep. You should be ok if you contact the center that is doing the test Continue reading >>

Advice For People With Diabetes Undergoing A Gastroscopy And/or Colonoscopy, January 2016

Advice For People With Diabetes Undergoing A Gastroscopy And/or Colonoscopy, January 2016

Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology - Patient information Advice for people with diabetes undergoing a gastroscopy and/or colonoscopy If your diabetes is treated with tablets: Do not take your diabetes tablets on the day of the test. Take your next dose of tablets when you are allowed to eat again. If your diabetes is treated with a combination of insulin and tablets such as Metformin follow advice for tablets as before and insulin in following paragraph on insulin. If your diabetes is treated with injections of either Exenetide (Byetta), Liraglutide (Victoza), Lixisenatide (Lyxumia) or Bydureon: do not take the injection 24 hours prior to the examination. Resume once you are eating normally again. If your diabetes is treated with insulin: During the period of bowel preparation when you are having low residue / low fibre diet take two-thirds of your regular insulin whatever your insulin regime. Remember you are allowed clear sugary drinks if your blood glucose levels are low i.e. below 5 mmol/L. During the 24 hours before your examination you will be taking clear fluids only. Stop fluid intake two hours before the procedure. For once daily insulin only e.g. Lantus (Glargine), Levermir (Determir), Tresiba (Degludec), Toujeo (New insulin glargine), Insuman Basal, or Insulatard and Humulin I: if your insulin is due on the morning of the test take two-thirds of your insulin dose. Take the normal dose the following morning after your test and once you are eating. For twice daily long acting or medium acting insulin such as Lantus (Glargine), Levermir, Insulatard, Humulin I or Insuman Basal: take two-thirds of your normal dose in the morning. Take the normal dose after the test when it is next due once you resume your normal diet. For twice daily mixture insulin e.g. Humuli Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

Recently, an employee at Bottom Line Publications was scheduled for a colonoscopy, the screening test for colon cancer. The medical test turned into medical mayhem. The day before the test, the woman followed her doctor’s orders to start ingesting a “clear liquid” diet, which includes soft drinks, Jell-O and other clear beverages and foods. But when she drank the “prep”—the bowel-cleaning solution that is consumed the evening before a colonoscopy (and sometimes also the morning of)—she vomited. Over and over. As a result, her colon wasn’t sufficiently emptied to conduct the test, which had to be postponed. What went wrong? The woman has diabetes—and her glucose (blood sugar) levels had become unstable, triggering nausea and vomiting. Yet not one medical professional—not a doctor, not a nurse, not a medical technician—had warned her that people with diabetes need to take special precautions with food and diabetes medicine whenever they have any medical test that involves an extended period of little or no eating. Unfortunately, this lack of diabetes-customized instruction about medical tests is very common. What you need to know… If you’re undergoing a test that requires only overnight fasting, which includes many types of CT scans, MRIs and X-rays, make sure that the test is scheduled for early in the morning—no later than 9 am. That way, you will be able to eat after the test by 10 am or 11 am, which will help to stabilize your blood sugar as much as possible. Don’t expect your blood sugar levels to be perfect after the test. The important thing is to keep them from getting too high or too low. Conventional dietitians and doctors specify clear liquids and foods that reflect the conventional American diet, such as regular soda, sports drink Continue reading >>

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