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Metformin Cause Kidney Stones

Renal Side Effects Of Metformin

Renal Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin, or Glucophage, is a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is available in both short and long-acting forms. RxList reports the most common side effects associated with metformin, occurring in more than 5 percent of patients using the drug, are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, diffuse lack of strength, headache, indigestion and abdominal discomfort. Metformin-induced renal side effects are rare but can be lethal. Video of the Day Metformin is excreted out of the body by the kidneys. When the kidneys are not functioning properly, metformin can accumulate in high concentrations which may result in lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a rare, serious metabolic abnormality that occurs with uncontrolled diabetes, severe hypotension as well as high metformin levels. According to Drugs.com, metformin-induced lactic acidosis is fatal in more than 50 percent of cases and usually occurs in diabetic patients with significant kidney dysfunction. Metformin should be used with great caution in patients with chronic renal disease and should be temporarily discontinued for surgery or procedures requiring radiocontrast agents. Symptoms of lactic acidosis are usually nonspecific but may include hypothermia, hypotension and a slow heart rhythm. Lactic acidosis always mandates immediate hospitalization with intensive supportive care and usually hemodialysis. Acute Renal Failure Acute renal failure is characterized by the kidneys' inability to filter toxins out of the blood as a result of injury to the kidney. There are numerous causes of acute renal failure but one of the more common is dehydration. Gastrointestinal side effects are common with metformin therapy and significant diarrhea or vomiting, particularly when there is underlying chronic renal dise Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Treatment And Prevention Of Kidney Stones

Symptoms, Treatment And Prevention Of Kidney Stones

Kidney stones cause debilitating pain in both men and women. Each year in the United States, kidney stones result in over one million visits to health care providers and more than 300,000 visits to hospital emergency rooms. Recurrent or complex kidney stones are particularly painful, and require special treatment. The majority of these kidney stones, depending on their size and location, can be removed with minimally invasive techniques such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy or percutaneous surgery. SWL is a relatively non-invasive procedure that uses targeted shock waves to break stones into tiny pieces that are passed naturally in the urine. It is important to not only understand the symptoms and treatment options for kidney stones, but also the best ways to prevent them from recurring. Manoj Monga, MD is the director of Cleveland Clinics Stevan B. Streem Center for Endourology and Stone Disease in Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute. He is board certified in urology. His specialty interests are kidney stones, ureteral strictures, ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, retroperitoneal fibrosis and kidney (renal) stone disease. Dr. Monga completed his research fellowship, residency in urology and general surgery residency at Tulane University Hospital & Clinics, in New Orleans. He graduated from medical school from Chicago Medical School, in Chicago. Dr. Manoj Monga sees patients at Cleveland Clinics Center for Endourology and Stone Disease in Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute at main campus. Juan C. Calle, MD is an associate staff physician in the Department of Nephrology and Hypertension in Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute. Dr. Calle is board certified in internal medicinenephrology and his specialty interests include kidney stones and o Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although metformin, the popular type 2 diabetes medication, is usually not prescribed for people with kidney disease, a new analysis shows the drug may be safer for these patients than once thought. Metformin has been used in the United States for two decades to help lower blood sugar levels among people with type 2 diabetes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautions that people with kidney disease should not take the drug because it could increase their risk for a potentially serious condition called lactic acidosis. This is when lactic acid builds up in the bloodstream after oxygen levels in the body are depleted. After reviewing published research to evaluate the risks associated with metformin among people with mild to moderate kidney disease, a team of researchers led by Dr. Silvio Inzucchi, a professor of medicine at Yale University, found these patients were at no greater risk for lactic acidosis than people who were not taking the drug. "What we found is that there is essentially zero evidence that this is risky," Inzucchi, who is also medical director of the Yale Diabetes Center, said in a university news release. "The drug could be used safely, so long as kidney function is stable and not severely impaired," he said. Despite warnings, many doctors are already prescribing metformin to patients with kidney disease, the study published in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed. "Many in the field know that metformin can be used cautiously in patients who have mild to moderate kidney problems," Inzucchi said. "Most specialists do this all the time." Still, the researchers said their findings are significant because many doctors stop prescribing metformin once their patients g Continue reading >>

Kidney Stones In Relation To Obesity And Diabetes

Kidney Stones In Relation To Obesity And Diabetes

A kidney stone is a solid mass developed from crystals that separate from the urine within the urinary tract. Kidney stones can contain various components. The most common type of stone contains calcium in combination with either oxalate or phosphate. A less common type of stone is caused by an infection in the urinary tract. This type of stone is called a struvite or infection stone. Another type of stone, uric acid stones, are less common, and cystine stones are rare. It is not completely understood as to why kidney stones form. The single biggest factor in the formation of kidney stones is diet. Certain foods may promote stone formation in people who are susceptible, and a person with a family history of kidney stones may be more likely to develop them. Urinary tract infections, kidney disorders such as cystic kidney diseases, and certain metabolic disorders are also linked to stone formation. Over the past 30 years, the number of people in the United States diagnosed with kidney stones has been increasing. In the late 1970s, less than 4% of the population experienced kidney stones. By the early 1990s, the percentage of the population with stones had increased to more than 5%. The number of Americans suffering from kidney stones between 2007 and 2010 nearly doubled from 1994, according to a new study by researchers at UCLA and the RAND Corporation. Researchers reviewed responses from 12,110 individuals and found that between 2007 and 2010, 8.8% of the U.S. population had a kidney stone, which is one out of every 11 people. In 1994, the rate was one out of 20. Caucasians are more prone to develop kidney stones than African Americans, and stones are more prevalent in men. The incidence of kidney stones rises dramatically as men enter their 40s and continues to rise int Continue reading >>

Metformin Kidney Stones - Medhelp

Metformin Kidney Stones - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin kidney stones I left something out. Even with one kidney blocked you can still pee, because the other kidney is still functioning. for celiac and is now believed to not have Celiac Disease. She has had several instances of ovarian cysts and kidney stones .She has suffered from severe abdominal pain, constant nausea, constipation, diarrhea, aches all over her body, weight loss (24 lbs), and dehydration which most recently caused an eleven-day hospitalization. She has been medicated with the three main gastrp-paresis drugs (regalin, erethromyacin, and domperadome (sp? I was recently diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome and started on metformin, which caused some diarrhea, around the same time the abdominal pain began. I also have a history of kidney stones , and was born with one kidney, which is on the right side. My primary care physician was concerned about kidney stone/obstruction, and sent me to my urologist. urologist found kidney stones - high blood pressure; I have had difficulty with blood pressure since I was 18, but was able to control this for many years with diet, exercise and by going off birth control pills. In Sept. 2004 I suddenly had a bp of 150/100 and my doctor put me on dyazide. The diuretic made me crave salt worse than I ever have... I have always craved salt, but this was much worse. The problems went away I started getting dizzy all the time last april . It finally went a way in June, In august I had kidney stones and no flare up since .Then the light headness returned in October. I had a mri done till table table test done and stress done passed all the tests. Then this jannuary I started getting nausea all the time. So I had ultra sound test done and it showed thickening of the gallbladder wall. Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Kidney Stones

Does Metformin Cause Kidney Stones

What are the possible reasons of kidney stones? ... I discovered that I had a 3mm kidney stone that began traveling on 6-12 causing blood in my urine. Pain began 6-13. Went to emergency 6-14 because I was out of my home area. Never caught the stone ... today, Sat. Aug 26. I have to go bad but cant pee at all. What could be causing that & could it be an unpassable kidney stone? ... i have a question. i am a hypochondriac and feel like i may have kidney stones. i want to go get them checked however, i want to know that if i got them and theyre small and in place and not causing ... Hi i was wondering wat the main causes of kidmey stones are and how long id have to be off work ... stones i got a very uncomfortable feelin an i get pains in my back, side and front of my side and above ... I met a doctor and for back pain..after doing ultrasound...he said I am having kidney stones, I want to know what are the causes of kidney stones?? ... i had a tubal ligation in 2005 since then i have had 11 kidney stone surgeries and have to go to urologist again for number 12 could the tubal be causing this before the tubal i had none. i changed diet ... I have had lithotripsy in the past and it does not work, I have a stone in each kidney, causing ... to it has never worked before. Cant I just wait until they move as long as there is no damage to kidney. ... I have a kidney stone(4mm) in the left side and is causing a severe amount of pain, what can ... water daily.how can I get ridge of the stone?plz help.I m 39years old woman. ... anything like kidney stone, all internal female organs look o.k. cannot have mri as she has a pacer. does have some degenerative disc changes; but no compression fractures. any suggestions for cause or other ... which is seen approx. 61 mm distal from the PU Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Increase My Risk For Developing Kidney Stones?

Does Diabetes Increase My Risk For Developing Kidney Stones?

What’s the connection between diabetes and kidney stones? Diabetes is a condition in which your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t use it properly. Insulin is crucial to regulating blood sugar levels. High blood sugar can cause problems in any part of your body, including your kidneys. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have very acidic urine. That increases your risk for developing kidney stones. Kidney stones form when you have high concentrations of certain substances in your urine. Some kidney stones form from excess calcium oxalate. Others form from struvite, uric acid, or cysteine. The stones can travel from your kidney through your urinary tract. Small stones may pass through your body and out in your urine with little or no pain. Larger stones may cause a great deal of pain. They can even get lodged in your urinary tract. That can block urine flow and cause infection or bleeding. Other symptoms of kidney stones include: back or abdominal pain nausea vomiting If you experience severe symptoms of kidney stones, see your doctor. Your doctor may suspect kidney stones based on your symptoms. Urinalysis, blood tests, and imaging tests may be needed to confirm the diagnosis. Anyone can form a kidney stone. In the United States, almost 9 percent of people have had at least one kidney stone, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. In addition to diabetes, other risk factors for kidney stones include: obesity diet high in animal protein family history of kidney stones diseases and conditions that affect the kidneys diseases and conditions that affect the amount of calcium and certain acids in your body urinary tract disorders or chronic inflammation of the bowel Certain medications can also put you at higher ris Continue reading >>

Original Research Use Of Metformin And Risk Of Kidney Cancer In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Original Research Use Of Metformin And Risk Of Kidney Cancer In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Highlights • The reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance of Taiwan was used. • Kidney cancer risk was analyzed in users and non-users of metformin. • Metformin reduces the risk of kidney cancer in a dose–response pattern. • The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 0.279 (0.254–0.307). • Risk of any cancer was also significantly reduced in metformin users. Abstract The anticancer effect of metformin has been reported in the literature but requires additional confirmation in epidemiologic studies. With respect to kidney cancer scarce data are available. This study investigates whether metformin use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) might affect kidney cancer risk. The reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance in Taiwan was used. T2DM patients aged ≥40 years and newly treated with either metformin (n = 171,753, “ever users of metformin”) or other antidiabetic drugs (n = 75,499, “never users of metformin”) within 1998–2002 were followed for at least 6 months for kidney cancer until 31 December 2009. The treatment effect was estimated by Cox regression using propensity score weighting by inverse probability of treatment weighting approach. Hazard ratios were estimated for ever versus never users, and for tertiles of cumulative duration of metformin therapy. During follow-up, 917 ever users and 824 never users developed kidney cancer, with respective incidence of 80.09 and 190.30 per 100,000 person-years. The hazard ratio (95% confidence intervals) for ever versus never users is 0.279 (0.254–0.307); and is 0.598 (0.535–0.668), 0.279 (0.243–0.321) and 0.104 (0.088–0.124), respectively, for the first, second, and third tertile of cumulative duration of <14.5, 14.5–45.8 and >45.8 mont Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Kidney Problems?

Can Metformin Cause Kidney Problems?

Actually, metformin is usually not the original cause of kidney problems. However, metformin is eliminated by the kidneys and when a patient has poor kidney function, the metformin can build up in the blood and cause a rare but serious condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis affects the chemistry balance of your blood and can lead to kidney failure and other organ failure. The risk of lactic acidosis is very low and most often occurs in patients with poor kidney function - so for most patients, the benefits of metformin outweigh the risks of treatment. Most doctors will regularly perform kidney function tests to make sure the kidney is working well in patients who are taking metformin. With that said, if you are taking metformin, contact your doctor immediately if you experience unexplained weakness, muscle pain, difficulty breathing, or increased drowsiness - these can be early signs of lactic acidosis. Also, if you are taking metformin and going to receive a radiocontrast dye study or have surgery, tell your doctors that you are taking metformin - in most cases, your doctor will instruct you to temporarily stop taking metformin during these procedures to help decrease the risk of lactic acidosis. Continue Learning about Metformin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones and gallstones both occur more frequently in people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which causes insulin resistance. Kidney Stones and Type 2 Diabetes Kidney stones or nephrolithiasis are small pebble-like pieces of material that form in one or both of your kidneys from minerals in the urine. While most kidney stones exit the body without the help of a doctor, some stones get caught in the urinary tract where they can block the flow of urine and cause great pain. Kidney stones come in several types. The most common are uric acid stones, calcium oxalate stones, and infectious stones. People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome are particularly susceptible to developing uric acid kidney stones. Causes & Symptoms One reason why people with diabetes have a higher chance of having a kidney stone is that they often have highly-acidic urine, which puts them at risk for developing uric acid stones. Behind this acidic urine is poorly controlled diabetes. “When the body doesn’t have enough sugar for metabolism because either it isn’t producing insulin or not responding to insulin it’s forced to metabolize fat and that can make your urine acidotic,” says Phillip Mucksavage, MD, director of endourology and stone disease at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. “This condition, called ketoacidosis, can change levels of the pH in urine.” Diabetes patients also have more calcium oxalate stones than the general population. Once again, uncontrolled diabetes is the culprit. “Uncontrolled diabetes can cause dehydration which is a prime risk factor for calcium oxalate stones,” says Dr. Mucksavage. Other diseases such as high blood pressure and obesity may also increase the risk of developing kidney stones. About 10% of people with kidney stones never k Continue reading >>

Metformin And Kidney Stones

Metformin And Kidney Stones

D.D. Family Type 2 since 1993, on pump since 3/10 My son was recently diagnosed with T2. His doctor prescribed Metformin; however, my son has read somewhere that Metformin has been linked to kidney stones so he does not want to take it. Has anyone heard about this? D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 Tell him to drink a lot of water each day probably at least 3 litres and the stones should not be an issue. I don't think stones and met are that related. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Sure is a whole lot of stuff to read out there. I know at least 8 type 2 on met and none have had stones. Now could you get them I would suppose one could but in 29 yrs I never had any and I been on met that long. If you are disposed toward them then it's possible that this could bring them on faster, although this is something that I would research a lot more if I felt that this was a possible issue. My son was recently diagnosed with T2. His doctor prescribed Metformin; however, my son has read somewhere that Metformin has been linked to kidney stones so he does not want to take it. Has anyone heard about this? I don't see anything in the package insert for metformin that says anything about kidney stones; however, it's not recommended for those have kidney problems. He might want to ask his pharmacist about metformin and kidney stones. Continue reading >>

Metformin Prevents Renal Stone Formation Through An Antioxidant Mechanism In Vitro And In Vivo

Metformin Prevents Renal Stone Formation Through An Antioxidant Mechanism In Vitro And In Vivo

Metformin Prevents Renal Stone Formation through an Antioxidant Mechanism In Vitro and In Vivo Xiong Yang , Hao Ding , Zhenbang Qin , Changwen Zhang , Shiyong Qi , Hongtuan Zhang , Tong Yang , Zhen He , Kuo Yang , E Du , Chunyu Liu , Yong Xu ,* and Zhihong Zhang * Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, 23 Pingjiang Road, Hexi District, Tianjin 300211, China Department of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical Un Continue reading >>

Metformin - Advanced Urologic Associates - Independence, Mo - Urology - Kidney Stones - Prostate Cancer - Urinary Incontinence

Metformin - Advanced Urologic Associates - Independence, Mo - Urology - Kidney Stones - Prostate Cancer - Urinary Incontinence

Brand: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet oblong, white, imprinted with 10 00, BMS 6071 round, white, imprinted with BMS 6060, 500 round, white, imprinted with BMS 6070, 850 oblong, white, imprinted with BMS 6063, 500 oval, white, imprinted with IP 177, 10 00 oval, white, imprinted with Hourglass Logo 4432, 10 00 oblong, peach, imprinted with WPI WPI, 2455 oblong, white, imprinted with APO500, MET oval, white, imprinted with LOGO 4331, 500 oval, white, imprinted with LOGO 4330, 850 What is the most important information I should know about metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin? You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: metabolic or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you ne Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Stones

Diabetes And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are bits of grit formed from minerals in the urine. They can be terribly painful, block urine flow, and damage kidneys. Diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney stones. Stones start out small, like grains of sand. They may hurt, but they will pass by themselves. When they get larger than about 4 millimeters (about 0.2 inches) in diameter, they can get stuck in the ureters, the urine passageways. Then they can become agonizing, cause infection, and block urine in the kidney. This is a very serious complication. Intense kidney stone pain is usually felt in the flank, the side of the mid- to lower back where the stone is. When pain is severe, it can cause vomiting leading to dehydration. These are serious problems for anyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Kidney stones can form from several different minerals. The two main categories are calcium stones and uric acid stones. People with diabetes have higher rates of both, and much higher rates for the uric acid kind, because their urine tends to be more acidic. One study at the Mayo Clinic followed 3,500 patients for 20 years and concluded that those with diabetes developed 40% more uric acid kidney stones than those without diabetes Scientists don’t know why diabetic urine is more acid. The American Society of Nephrology says insulin resistance has something to do with it. High levels of insulin in the blood are associated with acid urine. Bodies make buffers such as ammonium to neutralize the acid, and insulin resistance seems to lower the production of ammonium. Other risk factors for stones include fatness, urinary tract infections, not drinking enough water, gastric bypass surgery, and high salt intake. Preventing stones Most kidney stone prevention focuses on diet. The best supported resul Continue reading >>

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