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Metformin Before Or After Meal

Let’s Get To Know Synjardy

Let’s Get To Know Synjardy

SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are prescription medicines that contain 2 diabetes medicines, empagliflozin (JARDIANCE) and metformin. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR can be used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and can be used in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease when both empagliflozin and metformin are appropriate and empagliflozin is needed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are not for people with type 1 diabetes, or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR? SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR can cause serious side effects, including Lactic Acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood). Metformin, one of the medicines in SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR, can cause lactic acidosis, a rare but serious condition that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in the short term (“binge” drinking); get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids); have surgery; have a heart attack, severe infection, o Continue reading >>

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Skipping a meal is typically no big deal. But if you have diabetes, missing meals can throw off the important balancing act between food intake and medication. The result is blood sugars that are too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) — and that’s dangerous. “If you take medications for diabetes that can cause low blood sugars, you should try not to skip meals,” says registered dietician Dawn Noe. “If you’re just not up to eating on a regular schedule, talk to your doctor about diabetes medications that won’t cause low blood sugars,” she says. Monitoring sugars is vital When you’re ill or just don’t feel like eating much, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels more closely than ever. How often depends on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and what medications you take. For type 1 diabetes: Be sure to monitor your blood sugar before meals and before bedtime, typically four times per day, says diabetes specialist Bartolome Burguera, MD. Beyond that, check your blood sugars if you notice symptoms of low blood sugar. Those symptoms include: Hunger Shakiness or nervousness Sweating Dizziness or light-headedness Sleepiness Confusion Difficulty speaking Anxiety Weakness For type 2 diabetes: If you are taking a sulfonylurea medication, check your blood sugars at least twice a day — in the morning and at bedtime. “It’s important to keep in mind that sulfonylureas may cause blood sugar to drop during the day if you don’t eat anything after taking your medication,” Dr. Burguera says. If your only treatment is metformin, you may not need to check your blood sugar more than once a day. This medication doesn’t typically cause hypoglycemia. It is important to be aware of the symptoms associated with low blood sugars and Continue reading >>

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral hypoglycemic drugs are used only in the treatment of type 2 diabetes which is a disorder involving resistance to secreted insulin. Type 1 diabetes involves a lack of insulin and requires insulin for treatment. There are now four classes of hypoglycemic drugs: Sulfonylureas Metformin Thiazolidinediones Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These drugs are approved for use only in patients with type 2 diabetes and are used in patients who have not responded to diet, weight reduction, and exercise. They are not approved for the treatment of women who are pregnant with diabetes. SULFONYLUREAS – Sulfonylureas are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and appear to function by stimulating insulin secretion. The net effect is increased responsiveness of ß-cells (insulin secreting cells located in the pancreas) to both glucose and non-glucose secretagogues, resulting in more insulin being released at all blood glucose concentrations. Sulfonylureas may also have extra-pancreatic effects, one of which is to increase tissue sensitivity to insulin, but the clinical importance of these effects is minimal. Pharmacokinetics – Sulfonylureas differ mainly in their potency & their duration of action. Glipizide, glyburide (glibenclamide), and glimepiride are so-called second-generation sulfonylureas. They have a potency that allows them to be given in much lower doses. Those drugs with longer half-lives (particularly chlorpropamide, glyburide, and glimepiride) can be given once daily. This benefit may be counterbalanced by a substantially increased risk of hypoglycemia. Side effects – Sulfonylureas are usually well tolerated. Hypoglycemia is the most common side effect and is more common with long-acting sulfonylureas. Patients recently discharged from hospit Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

When To Take Diabetes Tablet : Before Food Or After Food . Before 15/30 Or After 15/30 Mt. Food Taken

When To Take Diabetes Tablet : Before Food Or After Food . Before 15/30 Or After 15/30 Mt. Food Taken

You dont have all this hassles of when to take and if i miss out one dose what happens ......Siddha medicine through Bogar Siddha care is 100% safe and no side effects.....Any type of Diabetes and the related side effects can be treated successfully through Siddha system of Medicine by Dr.Jayaseelan at Bogar Siddha Care & naturopathy ....It is 100% safe since it is Natural Herbal Treatment without any side effects It was my personal experience with Siddha treatment for my father which cured him from Stroke & Diabetes and the benefit which my family enjoyed with the Siddha system of medicine made me to get into this health care platform through Bogar Siddha Care & Naturopathy to help the patients who suffer with me many terminal disease. Please do visit the website for Bogar Siddha Care & Naturopathy bogarsiddhacare.com/ and get the benefits of Siddha treatment for various disease... Please share this information with all your friends and colleagues which will be very helpful to them.... You can save many lives. With many thanks and Warm Regards, N.D.Sreedhar +91-85533 74479 Hi, I have been diagnosed to have diabetes since past one year now.My doctor has prescribed me glycomet 500 SR 1-0-0 per day.So I have been consuming it along with my breakfast.Recently when my blood tests were done I noticed that my FBS was 114,whereas my PPBS was 106...my doc. says it is the effect of the tablet but he didnt change the dosage or the timings of the drug.would like to know how can I keep the FBS well within the limit? Continue reading >>

When To Take Byetta?

When To Take Byetta?

The website and the video that came with the starter kit the doctor gave me say I can eat immediately after the shot, or up to an hour after it. I have read comments from quite a few people saying that they eat right after the injection. However my doctor insits that this is not a good idea at all. He says, he dosen't care what the website or the video says.My doctor says that since the Byetta is injected under the skin, not intravenous ly, it's effects are not immediate. Therefore he says that I should wait 15 minutes after my injection before eating "to give the byetta's effects a chance to kick in". Makes sense to me, particularly for the appetite suppressing quality it's supposed to have. I can't believe that would happen instantly after taking the shot.Yet I still see many who say they eat right afterward, so not sure who is right. Ya know Steve, its all a matter of convience and life style. There are lottsa days I end up taking my shot AFTER a meal because Im not home and taking it post meal is better than not taking it at all. YES, many of the functions that Byetta has are better if you give the drug 15-20 mins to get into your blood stream, but lots of times, lifestyle just doesn't allow us to be that rigid. But the ultimate answer to your question is yes, take your shot and give it some time to work before you eat. And if you are going to be that strict, remember to take your oral meds at least 45 mins before you take your shot. Well, typically metformin is prescribed to be taken "with a meal" and actos or any of the sulfonylaureas are presribed to be taken half an hour "before a meal". The reason for actos prior to a meal is simply so it can start stimulating insulin production to ameliorate any spike in blood sugar youhave due to your meal. The metformin whi Continue reading >>

Preparing For Diabetes Labs And Other Tests

Preparing For Diabetes Labs And Other Tests

When people take insulin or diabetes pills to control blood sugar, it might take some extra planning before getting lab work and other tests done. Many tests, such as a blood test to measure cholesterol, require that a person stop eating, drinking, and taking medicine for a certain amount of time before the test. Tests can also be stressful for people. Stress can cause blood sugar levels to go up. When that happens, a person needs to test blood sugar levels more often and adjust medicine as needed. If you're worried about any tests that you have scheduled, even if the test isn't related to diabetes, talk to your doctor or other member of your health care team. Ask if you need to do anything special to prepare and whether the test might affect your blood sugar levels. Preparing for Tests Tests that require you to be at the medical facility for several hours Some tests require you to be at the medical facility for several hours. Even if you don't need to make any changes in what you eat or drink, tell the people in charge of the testing that you have diabetes. Ask if there are any special steps you need to take to make sure you can keep your blood sugar levels stable. A week or so before the test, make sure you know: What time you'll be having your test. How the test fits with your schedule for eating and taking your diabetes medicines. When your diabetes medicine is likely to reach its peak. If it's during the test, find out if you will be able to eat or drink something right before or right after the test to keep your blood sugar from dropping too low. On the day of your test: Take glucose tablets or a carbohydrate snack and your diabetes medicine with you to the test. Remind the people doing the test that you have diabetes. Tell them when you last ate and, if you take Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Take metformin just after a meal or with a snack. The most common side-effects are feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain. These symptoms usually pass after the first few days of treatment. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor and clinics. This is so your progress can be checked. About metformin Type of medicine A biguanide antidiabetic medicine Used for Type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Bolamyn®; Diagemet®; Glucient®; Glucophage®; Metabet®; Sukkarto® Available as Tablets and modified-release tablets; oral liquid medicine; sachets of powder Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar in their blood. This is because good control of blood sugar levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like metformin are given alongside the changes in diet. Metformin allows the body to make better use of the lower amount of insulin which occurs in the kind of diabetes known as type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be given on its own, or alongside insulin or another antidiabetic medicine. There are a number of tablets available which contain metformin in combination with one of these other antidiabetic medicines (brands include Jentadueto®, Competact®, Komboglyze®, Janumet®, and Eucreas®). Taking a combination tablet like these can help to reduce the total number of tablets that need to be taken each d Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Metformin | The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes

Metformin | The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes

Metformin primarily reduces the liver s ability to releaseglucose from its stores. Metformin is usually taken with meals, either once or twice a day depending on the brand. Available dosage of pills include 500 mg, 850 mg, and 1000 mg. The treatment plan will differ for each patient, but a common starting regimen is listed below: To avoid stomach upset, patients usually start with a very low dose (500 mg), taken with dinner. After a few weeks, the dose may increase to 500 mg with breakfast and 500 mg with dinner. A few weeks later, the dose may increase again to 500 mg with breakfast and 1 g with dinner. If the patient has no side effects, the dose mayincrease to 1000 mg with breakfast and 1000 mg with dinner. This is usually the maximum dose. Metformin is the treatment of choice for type 2 diabetes because it works well, is inexpensive, and it has been around for decades. Patients may lose a few pounds of weighton metformin. Metformin is very effective at controlling blood glucose and lowers A1c levels by as much as 2% at maximum doses. By itself, metformin does not usually cause low blood glucose. Side effects including diarrhea. However, a slow increase in doses or extended release preparations can often prevent this. In rare cases, metformin can have a serious adverse side effectcalled lactic acidosis , where the body produces potentially dangerous levels of lactic acid. This condition is rare, and occurs more commonly in personswho are olderor havefrom heart failure , history of heavy alcohol use, or advanced kidney disease. To prevent serious kidney damage, patients generally shouldNOT take metformin for 24 hours beforeor 48 hours afterreceiving IV contrast for a CT scan . Patients with mild-to-moderate liver or kidney problems may need to take reduced doses of m Continue reading >>

Metformin: Dosage And How To Take

Metformin: Dosage And How To Take

Advice on metformin dosage, whether to take it with food and what to do if you miss a dose. Dosages of metformin and how often should I take it? The dosage of metformin will depend on your blood sugar levels, your dosage will be personalized for you. The dose is usually increased gradually over a few weeks, until the optimum dose for your is reached. These instructions should be printed on the medication label. Metformin is usually given once daily for the first few weeks of treatment. This is then increased to twice or three times a day. The dose of metformin will be adjusted depending on blood sugar levels. Metformin should be taken with food or a meal to reduce the side effects. When starting treatment with metformin, taking it with your main meal helps to reduce side effects. What forms of metformin are available and how do I take them? Metformin comes as tablets, liquid or sachets of powder that are mixed with water. If you have been given metformin sachets, pour the powder from the sachet into a glass and add 150 ml of water. Stir the solution to mix it, and then drink it straightaway. Metformin also comes as 'modified-release' or 'slow-release' tablets, that are designed to release the metformin slowly and continuously over several hours as the tablet passes through the gut. This produces a steady blood level of the medicine throughout the day. These tablets often have MR, SR or XL in their name. Modified-release metformin tablets are designed to be taken either once or twice a day - follow the instructions given by your doctor. This type of tablet must be swallowed whole with a drink. Don't break, chew or crush these tablets, as this would damage the modified-release action. The shells of some slow-release metformin tablets such as Glucophage SR may pass throug Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

How To Take Xigduo Xr

How To Take Xigduo Xr

What is the most important information I should know about XIGDUO XR? XIGDUO XR can cause serious side effects, including lactic acidosis. Metformin, one of the medicines in XIGDUO XR, can cause a rare, but serious, side effect called lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood) that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Stop taking XIGDUO XR and call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet, feel very weak or tired, unusual (not normal) muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness or sleep longer than usual, stomach pains, nausea or vomiting, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or have a slow or irregular heartbeat. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with XIGDUO XR if you have severe kidney problems, your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye, have liver problems, drink alcohol (very often or a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking), get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids), have surgery, have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke. Who should not take XIGDUO XR? Do not take XIGDUO XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with XIGDUO XR are allergic to dapagliflozin, metformin, or any of the ingredients in XIGDUO XR. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking XIGDUO XR a Continue reading >>

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