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Metformin And Sweating At Night

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes And Fatigue Relieved By Metformin.

Hot Flashes And Fatigue Relieved By Metformin.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To describe 3 patients with long-standing hot flashes, excessive sweating, and fatigue whose symptoms were ameliorated with metformin. METHODS: In this case series, we report the findings of laboratory evaluations, including assessments for thyroid, gonadal, adrenal, and pancreatic disorders, in 3 patients referred for endocrine evaluation. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test with measurement of fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations was conducted. A trial of metformin, 500 mg twice daily, was initiated in all patients. RESULTS: Evaluation of factors that are associated with hot flashes and increased sweating did not establish the cause of the patients' symptoms. The 3 patients had normal glucose tolerance test results and hyperinsulinemia. Metformin therapy markedly relieved the symptoms in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Hyperinsulinemia without hypoglycemia may produce a sympathoexcitatory response that manifests as hot flashes and increased sweating. Metformin may have sympathoinhibitory actions that alleviate these symptoms. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

DEAR DR. ROACH: As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Since hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had IMMEDIATE relief with the night sweats being eliminated the first day I stopped the medication. I am a 58-year-old female, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? -- R.M.T. ANSWER: Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasn't quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in up to 10 percent of people taking the medicati Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

Metformin Hcl Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes At Night And Metformin.

Hot Flashes At Night And Metformin.

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. In need of some answers. I just started taking metformin ER 250mg daily and was experiencing some hot flashes at night for the first few days and it seemed to taper off. Then this weekend I went up to 500mg and the same thing happened. I am slowly working my way to 2000mg. But was wondering if this is normal. Aside from the hot flashes and weird taste in my mouth after my pill, I don't really have any other side effects(yet). (extreme hunger went away after first week) I'm pretty sure I get this too...I wake up sweating at night and my husband says its not hot at all..I'm 27yrs old and am on 2000mg daily The Following User Says Thank You to dscavey For This Useful Post: I'm having a similar reaction. I was on regular met and my endo put my on the ER to see if it would help with some of the side effects of upset stomach. But I noticed since I switched to the ER that I frequently get hot for no reason at all during the day I haven't had any problems at night though. Which is kind of odd because before I had the chills. I actually came here to see if others had a similar side effect from the ER. The Following User Says Thank You to curlywurly For This Useful Post: when i first started taking it i got the worst hot flashes and my stomach was horrible and i got the worst muscle cramps of my life..... this repeated every time i upped my dose but once you get acclimated to the dosage it won't be so bad. just wait it out, you'll be ok!!! Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Flashes

Diabetes And Hot Flashes

If you’re a woman approaching or in menopause, hot flashes may be the bane of your existence. Those all-too-familiar bursts of heat can mean discomfort and much misery. Women who have diabetes may have hot flashes that can be linked with low blood sugars, too. Read on to learn more about hot flashes and what you can do to help keep them at bay. What exactly are hot flashes? Hot flashes are sudden feelings of intense warmth that can come on over a few minutes or, more likely, all of a sudden. They are often accompanied by other symptoms, such as redness of the face or neck, sweating, rapid heartbeat, headache, and then feeling chilled once the flash has passed. “Night sweats,” or hot flashes that occur at night and result in excessive sweating, can be particularly disruptive to sleep. Recurring night sweats can lead to insomnia. While hot flashes can occur in anyone for a variety of reasons, they’re very common in women who are approaching menopause (perimenopause) or who are menopausal. (Men can also have hot flashes due to androgen deprivation therapy.) There’s no rhyme or reason to them, either: they can vary in intensity, they can come and go quickly or linger, and they can persist for months or even for years. Hot flashes are also more likely to occur in women who are overweight or who smoke. African-American women are more likely to get hot flashes than Caucasian women; women of Asian descent are less likely to experience them. What causes hot flashes? The cause of hot flashes is somewhat of a mystery. However, scientists believe that they’re related to imbalanced levels of hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, and changes in the body’s thermostat, which is located in the hypothalamus in the brain. When a hot flash occurs, blood vessels in the Continue reading >>

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

An episode of low blood glucose occurring at night. During sleep, the body’s energy needs fall, and consequently the liver pumps out less glucose, the body’s fuel. In people without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the liver’s lowered glucose production by secreting less insulin, and in this way, a balance is maintained. In people with Type 1 diabetes, this balance is harder to maintain since the pancreas no longer secretes insulin. Instead, a person must inject just enough insulin — but not too much — before bedtime to maintain a normal nighttime blood glucose level. A number of things can throw off the balance. Injecting too much insulin or injecting the right amount at the wrong time can lower blood glucose more than desired. Eating less food than usual during the day or eating the evening meal or snack at a different time than usual can affect blood sugar during the night. Exercising more than usual during the day can also cause low blood glucose at night. Many of the classic signs of low blood glucose — including shakiness, light-headedness, dizziness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, irritability, and extreme hunger — can occur during the day or at night. Nighttime hypoglycemia has also been known to cause night sweats, headache, restless sleep, and nightmares. Nighttime hypoglycemia is a common problem among people who control their blood glucose intensively through multiple injections of insulin during the day. In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, a study that evaluated the benefits and risks of “tight” blood glucose control, people on tight control regimens were three times more likely to have an episode of hypoglycemia than those on standard regimens, and more than half of these episodes occurred while people were sleeping. Although Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Gustatory Sweating With Diabetes

Gustatory Sweating With Diabetes

Hi Mell I too suffered from almost constant sweats, morning, noon & night-time. Didn't know what was causing them diabetes or just 'my age'? Once I'd given up trying to control my type 2 diabetes by diet and started the Metformin the sweats disappeared, just like magic. Have just been diagnosed with a 'fatty liver' due to the diabetes and have been prescribed Orlistat to loose weight. Is there anyone else with type 2 and trying to cope with a low sugar diet alongside the orlistat restriced fat diet :roll: Would appreciate any advice about coping with both from someone with first hand experience. Womom Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

Do you ever wake up drenched in sweat in the middle of the night—even if the thermostat is turned low? Try these diabetes-friendly ways to prevent night sweats. If you’ve ever awakened a few hours after drifting off to sleep, wrapped in damp sheets and dripping with sweat, you know how disruptive it can be to a good night’s rest. Why might your body’s own thermostat be going haywire? “Night sweats are usually related to hypoglycemia, an episode of low blood sugar,” says L.A.-based diabetes educator Lori Zanini, RD. “Other signs of nighttime hypoglycemia include waking up with a headache and having nightmares,” both caused by fitful sleep. A variety of circumstances can throw your blood sugar off balance, from injecting the incorrect amount of insulin to eating or exercising differently than usual. “Focus on preventing your nighttime lows, rather than reacting to the symptoms caused by the lows,” says Zanini. Here’s how: Eat a bedtime snack. “A protein-rich snack is absorbed and processed by the liver slowly enough to ensure blood sugar remains stable throughout the night,” says Zanini. Opt for one that contains at least 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and one to two ounces of protein. Some ideas include: ¾ cup of blueberries and ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese Slice of whole-wheat, high-fiber toast with 1 to 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter One or two servings of string cheese Ask yourself: Have I been more active today? If the answer is “yes,” be sure to adjust for the extra physical activity by snacking or taking less blood sugar-lowering medication to compensate for burning extra sugar. Avoid late-night drinking. Consuming alcohol in the evening can put you at risk for low blood sugar, since your liver is busy clearing the alcohol from Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Summary Common metformin side effects include gastrointestinal problems such as nausea, vomiting, cramps and diarrhea. Hypoglycemia and lactic acid build-up are other more serious—but more rare—side effects of metformin. Some women may also experience vitamin B12 deficiency, and children specifically may possibly experience abnormal taste bud function and appetite loss. Common Metformin Side Effects The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal, and include the following: Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Cramps Other common side effects are represented by abnormal stools, muscle pain, changes in taste sensations and occasionally difficulties in breathing. Some patients may experience side effects in the shape of dizziness, light-headedness or flu-like symptoms, while others may have nail problems, palpitations, flushing of the face or an increase in thirst and/ or sweating. Serious Metformin Side Effects Occasionally, patients may experience side effects of a more serious nature. These side effects include allergic reactions, which may be manifested through unexplained swellings hives rashes itching wheezing and / or severe breathing difficulties. In some cases, the Metformin may cause a disturbance in electrolytes, causing the body to function within an acidic environment, a condition known as lactic acidosis. Often occurring severely and suddenly, lactic acidosis is the result of increased levels of lactic acid, in particular when Metformin is used to inhibit the process of glucose production, hepatic gluconeogenesis. This condition is sometimes the result of a metformin overdose and can cause severe muscle soreness. Another more serious side effect of metformin is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This occurs in individuals whose bodies are particularly Continue reading >>

Night Sweats With Chills

Night Sweats With Chills

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. what causes extreme sweating on and off with extreme chills in between the sweating? This happened to me all night last night. Grateful for any help. For T1 diabetics, sweating and chills (do you mean cold sweats??) are usually the result of very low BG! Did you test yourself at all when you were experiencing this? I am a type 2. I felt extrmely hot and then awhile later extremely cold. I also get numbness and tingling in my hands every night. I will test my blood during the night next time. I am on Metformin if this helps. thanks I am a type 2. I felt extrmely hot and then awhile later extremely cold. I also get numbness and tingling in my hands every night. I will test my blood during the night next time. I am on Metformin if this helps. thanks I've not experienced the extreme hotness or coldness ... but when my glucose is high, I get night sweats. I'm Type 2. For T1 diabetics, sweating and chills (do you mean cold sweats??) are usually the result of very low BG! Did you test yourself at all when you were experiencing this? I don't get the chills part so much, but I was having what I THOUGHT were hot flashes and it turned out to be my BG spiking up into the 200's. Once my levels stabilized - no more "flashes". What are you eating before bedtime? When do you take your meds? Maybe an adjustment is needed. yeah, well its prob. the wine I have. I take 500mg metformin morning and night. :wink: :wink: Isn't diabetes wonderful. I'm a type 2 and I used to sweat when I went low. I don't know if I was hot or cold but my pillow would be wet. I would get up and test and usually be in the low 70s. After Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

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