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Metformin And Strenuous Exercise

Metformin And Exercise

Metformin And Exercise

Metformin is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for type 2 diabetes. It has many benefits. Metformin has been used for decades, so its safety profile is known. It’s now generic, so it’s cheap. It reduces the liver’s overproduction of glucose, which is a big problem in people with type 2 diabetes, and also reduces insulin resistance (IR). There are even reports that it is associated with lower rates of certain types of cancer. Like all drugs, it does have some side effects, primarily nausea in some patients. Some say they can avoid the nausea by eating yogurt or taking the supplement silymarin . I don’t know, because the drug never caused me to have nausea. A more serious side effect is lactic acidosis, which can be fatal. However, that side effect is rare. But metformin users should be aware of its possibility, which increases when the kidneys are not operating fully, which is one reason you should stop taking the drug if you have a procedure like MRI that requires a contrast agent, which can sometimes affect the kidneys, or if your kidney function is impaired for some other reason. Metformin also mimics, to some extent, the effects of exercise. Both increase insulin sensitivity (reduce IR). Hence some researchers wondered if the combination of both metformin and exercise would give a better result than either one alone. To their surprise, they found that it didn’t. Exercise increased insulin sensitivity by 54%. Metformin is known to increase insulin sensitivity from 10 to 30%, although the increase is not seen in all studies. But in this study, when the subjects on metformin exercised, they saw no increase in insulin sensitivity. A recent study showed a similar effect with antioxidants. IR reductions with exercise were prevented in people taking antiox Continue reading >>

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin and Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes Examining treatment modality interactions 1Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 2Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Canada 3Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 4Faculty of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 5Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Corresponding author: Normand G. Boul, [email protected] . Received 2010 Nov 29; Accepted 2011 Apr 7. Copyright 2011 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To determine the effect of metformin on the acute metabolic response to submaximal exercise, the effect of exercise on plasma metformin concentrations, and the interaction between metformin and exercise on the subsequent response to a standardized meal. Ten participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this randomized crossover study. Metformin or placebo was given for 28 days, followed by the alternate condition for 28 days. On the last 2 days of each condition, participants were assessed during a nonexercise and a subsequent exercise day. Exercise took place in the morning and involved a total of 35 min performed at three different submaximal intensities. Metformin increased heart rate and plasma lactate during exercise (both P 0.01) but lowered respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.03) without affecting total energy expenditure, which suggests increased fat oxidation. Metformin plasma Continue reading >>

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Nearly 20 million Americans are headed down the road to diabetes, but modest weight loss and a bit more activity would be enough to turn them around. These people have prediabetes, meaning their above-normal blood sugar levels signal a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. A combination of obesity, inactivity and genetics is responsible. But most people with prediabetes aren’t aware they have it, and insurers may not cover testing for or treatment of the condition. “It’s really quite a remarkable opportunity, but it’s not as if everyone is rushing to be identified,” says Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes in La Jolla, Calif. Many people may be reluctant to get tested — and labeled — especially if they’re feeling fine, he adds. But catching the condition before it turns into full-blown diabetes can be a lifesaver. People with Type 2 diabetes either lose the ability to respond to insulin, or their bodies no longer make enough of the hormone. Insulin helps the body use glucose as fuel, so without it sugar builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, especially if blood sugar levels are not kept in check, diabetes can boost a person’s risk of heart disease and cause damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other body tissues. Prediabetes used to be called impaired fasting glucos Continue reading >>

Any Way To Stop Spikes With Strenuous Exercise?

Any Way To Stop Spikes With Strenuous Exercise?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Any way to stop spikes with strenuous exercise? Following the brilliant advice from people on this forum (LCHF), I've brought my blood sugar under tight control (it sits between 4.5 and 5.6 all day now, even after meals), apart from one thing: I play 5 a side football once a week and it always, without fail, spikes my blood sugar. It's very strenuous exercise which I understand can cause the liver to dump glucose and cause a spike, but last night my BS went up from 5.4 before starting to 10.6 after I'd finished which is a huge spike. It did come back down to 5.0 within a couple of hours so it's a temporary issue but one I'd like to eliminate or reduce if possible. What confuses me is where my liver is getting the glucose from to dump into my system - I'm currently on less than 20g of carbs a day (mainly from vegetables) so am adding very little into my system! I eat around 80g of protein a day which is not excessive but I wondered if that was still a bit high and I should drop down a bit on that? I guess the other question is whether these short spikes are worth enduring for the benefits exercise brings? I can't claim to be an expert, but if I remember my biochemistry correctly then fats, proteins and starches can all be changed in to glucose, its just a matter of your body prioritising what it uses. Sugar is the easiest to make into glucose it is already most of the way there (glucose is a sugar). Starchy foods come next as most starches are made up of strings of sugar molecules. Fats can be made into glucose and vice versa. The body tends to store energy as fat for later use and then break it down into glucose when it needs it if you are burning mor Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin And Exercise Training, Alone Or In Association, On Cardio-pulmonary Performance And Quality Of Life In Insulin Resistance Patients

Effects Of Metformin And Exercise Training, Alone Or In Association, On Cardio-pulmonary Performance And Quality Of Life In Insulin Resistance Patients

Effects of metformin and exercise training, alone or in association, on cardio-pulmonary performance and quality of life in insulin resistance patients Cadeddu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 Metformin (MET) therapy exerts positive effects improving glucose tolerance and preventing the evolution toward diabetes in insulin resistant patients. It has been shown that adding MET to exercise training does not improve insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of MET and exercise training alone or in combination on maximal aerobic capacity and, as a secondary end-point on quality of life indexes in individuals with insulin resistance. 75 insulin resistant patients were enrolled and subsequently assigned to MET (M), MET with exercise training (MEx), and exercise training alone (Ex). 12-weeks of supervised exercise-training program was carried out in both Ex and MEx groups. Cardiopulmonary exercise test and SF-36 to evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) was performed at basal and after 12-weeks of treatment. Cardiopulmonary exercise test showed a significant increase of peak VO2 in Ex and MEx whereas M showed no improvement of peak VO2 ( VO2 [CI 95%] Ex +0.26 [0.47to 0.05] l/min; VO2 MEx +0.19 [0.33to 0.05] l/min; VO2 M -0.09 [-0.03to -0.15] l/min; M vs E p < 0.01; M vs MEx p < 0.01; MEx vs Ex p = ns). SF-36 highlighted a significant increase in general QoL index in the MEx (58.3 19 vs 77.3 16; p < 0.01) and Ex (62.1 17 vs 73.7 12; p < 0.005) groups. We evidenced that cardiopulmonary negative effects showed by MET therapy may be counterbalanced with the combination of exercise training. Given that exercise training associated with MET produced similar effects to exercise training alone in terms of maximal aerobic capacity and HRQo Continue reading >>

High Intense Exercise And Metformin?

High Intense Exercise And Metformin?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I was diagnosed 2 months ago with PCOS and High Insulin. Im on nutrition and i have to say i think am on a good way as im having my periods back every 28 days. Ive been excercising for 5 years now. High Intense exercise. Classes. Stong ones (lol you got the point) Im super fine and when the class starts i start too feel really weak. Since that started i usually stop a lot of times for few seconds and then continue. But the last time i was ready to fall down. It was the first time in years that i havent manage to finish a class. Also, i cant eat. Im preety full the whole time. When i force myself to eat i end up standing up from the chair and vomit. I googled it. but i only found that is good to have metformin and exercise together it brings good results. By the way. When i went for the first time to my doc 2 months ago she told me when the package of metformin is over to go do more blood test and go for a scan to see if we have any improvements. My pack will finish next week, i called her and she told me that i was mistaken and that she will see me in 4-5 months. Last edited by Sarofan; 04-30-2010 at 02:27 PM. Hi! I'm on Met, very athletic & workout hard core. I've never experienced what you described. Do you think it may be because you aren't eating enough? Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin With Exercise

Metformin With Exercise

Diabetics can add exercise to medication for improved sugar levels.Photo Credit: Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images A mother of two and passionate fitness presenter, Lisa M. Wolfe had her first fitness article published in 2001. She is the author of six fitness books and holds an Associate of Arts in exercise science from Oakland Community College. When not writing, Wolfe is hula-hooping, kayaking, walking or cycling. Diabetics suffering from uncontrolled blood sugar, are on a quest for the most helpful combination of medication, diet and exercise. Metformin is one medication used to control blood sugar. Exercise is another option to help regulate the glucose -- or sugar -- levels of the body. Combined, metformin and exercise create a powerful weapon against out-of-control sugar levels. Controlling glucose levels is the most important concern for a diabetic. When you have diabetes, your body does not use insulin effectively. Insulin's purpose is to bind with sugar molecules and transport them into the cells for energy. In a diabetic, excess sugar is found in the bloodstream due to insulin's inefficiency. Metformin was approved in 1994 to help a diabetic's system decrease the amount of sugar made in the liver and decrease the amount of sugar absorbed in the intestines. This is beneficial because excess sugar levels can lead to kidney damage, blindness or heart disease. Another option for controlling sugar levels is exercise. All types of exercise will lead to health gains. Both aerobic, which includes walking, running and swimming, and anaerobic, which includes strength training, are beneficial in reducing blood-sugar levels. Aerobic exercise will also strengthen your heart, which is a protection against heart disease. Strength training trains your muscle cells to use gl Continue reading >>

The Blood Code Metformin Interferes With Exercise: A Catch-22 - The Blood Code

The Blood Code Metformin Interferes With Exercise: A Catch-22 - The Blood Code

If you are on prescription metformin and you are initiating an exercise program . . . Bravo to your efforts! Exercise works better than metformin to control blood sugars, and metformin interferes with exercise performance. [i] The energy you use during a sustained workout is funded in large part by free fatty acids in your bloodstream, metformin decreases this compound by 10-20%. Subjective fatigue was greater in those on metformin and heart rate was higher than usual on metformin. Researchers therefore absurdly suggested, people on metformin might need to workout less strenuously. [ii] Strenuous exercise is exactly what will cure the problem without the drugs. Therefore, since regular strenuous exercise improves insulin resistance better than metformin, [iii] adjust the latter. I hate to say it, your your doctor will be reluctant to reduce your metformin because he/she assumes that you are more likely to stick with popping a pill rather than persisting with an exercise routine. So even though exercise is a superior therapy, the medical advice you will likely receive will be based upon your presumed failure. Your success is up to you! So why has this errant medication become the ubiquitous go-to drug for type 2 diabetes, and precursor conditions? It is because the medical institution has narrowly defined the problem as high blood sugar. Thats it. Not insulin resistance, but high blood sugar. There are other drugs that increase insulin (sulfonylureas I have written about earlier) and thereby dramatically lower blood sugar, but in studies, people taking these medications tended to die more readily. [iv] So metformin, which doesnt overtly kill people, has become the preferred drug. Low expectations if you ask me. Throughout the Blood Code, Ill continue to encourage you to Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

Go to: Abstract Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG), but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE) protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up) of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels of people with and without diabetes is reviewed. Results Six studies of nondiabetics (51 males, 14 females) requiring 7.5 to 20 minutes/week of HIE are reviewed. Two weeks of sprint interval training increased insulin sensitivity up to 3 days postintervention. Twelve weeks near maximal interval running (total exercise time 40 minutes/week) improved BG to a similar extent as running at 65% VO2max for 150 minutes/week. Eight studies of diabetics (41 type 1 and 22 type 2 subjects) were reviewed. Six were of a single exercise session with 44 seconds to 13 minutes of HIE, and the others were 2 and 7 weeks duration with 20 and 2 minutes/week HIE, respectively. With type 1 and 2 diabetes, BG was generally higher during and up to 2 hours after HIE compared to controls. With type 1 diabetics, BG decreased from midnight to 6 AM following HIE the previous morning. With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for 24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at 48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%. Conclusion Very brief HIE improves BG 1 to 3 days postexercise in both diabetics and non-diabetics. HIE is unlikely to cause hypoglycemia during and immediately after exercise. Larger and longer randomized studies are needed to determine the safety, acceptability, long-term efficacy, and optimal exerc Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Exercise Enhances Metformins Effects, Study Finds

Exercise Enhances Metformins Effects, Study Finds

For more information, see the article Study finds exercise can help enhance diabetic medication. And to learn more about metformin, read Metformin: The Unauthorized Biography, by diabetes treatment specialist Wil Dubois. The EveryDay Steps walking guide has been launched to help people with Type 2 diabetes develop a walking routine. Bookmark DiabetesSelfManagement.com and tune in tomorrow to learn more. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. Nothing new here that hasnt been known for at least two decades and I would guess about two-thirds of diabetics who take treatment and management seriously. However who in their right mind with diabetes would eat a high-carb breakfast consisting of waffles and syrup ? Now thats just plain dumb! Unless of course you want your blood sugar levels taking off like a rocket. All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to your sources. All commenters are considered to be nonmedical professionals unless explicitly stated otherwise. Promotion o Continue reading >>

Mar-metformin (metformin) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

Mar-metformin (metformin) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

Glumetza (metformin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Glumetza (metformin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Severe renal impairment (eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m2). Metabolic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis. Increased risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis in renal or hepatic impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (eg, cationic drugs), 65yrs of age, undergoing radiological contrast study, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, and excessive alcohol intake; discontinue if lactic acidosis occurs. Discontinue at time of, or prior to intravascular iodinated contrast imaging in patients with eGFR 3060mL/min/1.73m2, history of hepatic impairment, alcoholism, heart failure, or will be given intra-arterial contrast; reevaluate eGFR 48hrs after procedure and restart therapy if renally stable. Suspend therapy if dehydration occurs or before surgery. Avoid if clinical or lab evidence of hepatic disease. Assess renal function prior to starting and periodically thereafter; more frequently in elderly or if eGFR <60mL/min/1.73m2. Elderly, debilitated, uncompensated strenuous exercise, malnourished or deficient caloric intake, adrenal or pituitary insufficiency, or alcohol intoxication: increased risk of hypoglycemia. Monitor hematology (esp. serum Vit. B12 in susceptible patients). Pregnancy (Cat.B): not recommended. Nursing mothers. Increased risk of lactic acidosis with topiramate, other carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, zonisamide, acetazolamide, dichlorphenamide); monitor. Concomitant cationic drugs that interfere with renal tubular transport systems (eg, ranolazine, vandetanib, dolutegravir, cimetidine) may increase metformin levels; monitor. Avoid excessive alcohol intake (potentiates effects of metformin on lactate). Diuretics, steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blockers, isoniazid, nic Continue reading >>

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

If you take insulin or another blood glucose-lowering medication, you are at risk for low blood sugar (usually defined as blood glucose < 65 mg/dl), or hypoglycemia, which can occur during or following physical activity. Low blood sugar can cause trembling, sweating, dizziness, blurred vision, impaired thinking, and even seizures and loss of consciousness. Exercise presents its own special challenges for managing blood sugar. Since any activity increases your body’s use of blood sugar, hypoglycemia can develop more easily. The more you understand about what makes your blood sugars go down (or sometimes up) during exercise, the easier it becomes to control and the more confident you can be about doing activities and staying in control of your diabetes. Much of your blood sugar response has to do with how much insulin is in your bloodstream. If your insulin levels are high during a physical activity, your muscles will take up more blood glucose (since muscle contractions themselves stimulate glucose uptake without insulin) and you’re more likely to end up with low blood sugars. You can even end up with late-onset hypoglycemia, which can occur from right after to up to 48 hours after you exercise. What’s important is to do your best to prevent lows before, during and after exercise by taking the steps listed below. Prevent Lows Before, During and After Exercise Learn how your body responds to exercise by checking your blood sugar levels before, (occasionally) during, and after exercise. If your blood sugar is near or below 70 mg/dl before you exercise, bring it back within normal range before you begin by consuming some carbohydrates. Always be prepared to correct a low by carrying a rapid-acting carbohydrate with you during exercise. Don’t assume you’ll be able Continue reading >>

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