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Metformin And Strenuous Exercise

Mar-metformin (metformin) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

Mar-metformin (metformin) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

Go to: Abstract Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG), but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE) protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up) of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels of people with and without diabetes is reviewed. Results Six studies of nondiabetics (51 males, 14 females) requiring 7.5 to 20 minutes/week of HIE are reviewed. Two weeks of sprint interval training increased insulin sensitivity up to 3 days postintervention. Twelve weeks near maximal interval running (total exercise time 40 minutes/week) improved BG to a similar extent as running at 65% VO2max for 150 minutes/week. Eight studies of diabetics (41 type 1 and 22 type 2 subjects) were reviewed. Six were of a single exercise session with 44 seconds to 13 minutes of HIE, and the others were 2 and 7 weeks duration with 20 and 2 minutes/week HIE, respectively. With type 1 and 2 diabetes, BG was generally higher during and up to 2 hours after HIE compared to controls. With type 1 diabetics, BG decreased from midnight to 6 AM following HIE the previous morning. With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for 24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at 48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%. Conclusion Very brief HIE improves BG 1 to 3 days postexercise in both diabetics and non-diabetics. HIE is unlikely to cause hypoglycemia during and immediately after exercise. Larger and longer randomized studies are needed to determine the safety, acceptability, long-term efficacy, and optimal exerc Continue reading >>

The Blood Code Metformin Interferes With Exercise: A Catch-22 - The Blood Code

The Blood Code Metformin Interferes With Exercise: A Catch-22 - The Blood Code

If you are on prescription metformin and you are initiating an exercise program . . . Bravo to your efforts! Exercise works better than metformin to control blood sugars, and metformin interferes with exercise performance. [i] The energy you use during a sustained workout is funded in large part by free fatty acids in your bloodstream, metformin decreases this compound by 10-20%. Subjective fatigue was greater in those on metformin and heart rate was higher than usual on metformin. Researchers therefore absurdly suggested, people on metformin might need to workout less strenuously. [ii] Strenuous exercise is exactly what will cure the problem without the drugs. Therefore, since regular strenuous exercise improves insulin resistance better than metformin, [iii] adjust the latter. I hate to say it, your your doctor will be reluctant to reduce your metformin because he/she assumes that you are more likely to stick with popping a pill rather than persisting with an exercise routine. So even though exercise is a superior therapy, the medical advice you will likely receive will be based upon your presumed failure. Your success is up to you! So why has this errant medication become the ubiquitous go-to drug for type 2 diabetes, and precursor conditions? It is because the medical institution has narrowly defined the problem as high blood sugar. Thats it. Not insulin resistance, but high blood sugar. There are other drugs that increase insulin (sulfonylureas I have written about earlier) and thereby dramatically lower blood sugar, but in studies, people taking these medications tended to die more readily. [iv] So metformin, which doesnt overtly kill people, has become the preferred drug. Low expectations if you ask me. Throughout the Blood Code, Ill continue to encourage you to Continue reading >>

Any Way To Stop Spikes With Strenuous Exercise?

Any Way To Stop Spikes With Strenuous Exercise?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Any way to stop spikes with strenuous exercise? Following the brilliant advice from people on this forum (LCHF), I've brought my blood sugar under tight control (it sits between 4.5 and 5.6 all day now, even after meals), apart from one thing: I play 5 a side football once a week and it always, without fail, spikes my blood sugar. It's very strenuous exercise which I understand can cause the liver to dump glucose and cause a spike, but last night my BS went up from 5.4 before starting to 10.6 after I'd finished which is a huge spike. It did come back down to 5.0 within a couple of hours so it's a temporary issue but one I'd like to eliminate or reduce if possible. What confuses me is where my liver is getting the glucose from to dump into my system - I'm currently on less than 20g of carbs a day (mainly from vegetables) so am adding very little into my system! I eat around 80g of protein a day which is not excessive but I wondered if that was still a bit high and I should drop down a bit on that? I guess the other question is whether these short spikes are worth enduring for the benefits exercise brings? I can't claim to be an expert, but if I remember my biochemistry correctly then fats, proteins and starches can all be changed in to glucose, its just a matter of your body prioritising what it uses. Sugar is the easiest to make into glucose it is already most of the way there (glucose is a sugar). Starchy foods come next as most starches are made up of strings of sugar molecules. Fats can be made into glucose and vice versa. The body tends to store energy as fat for later use and then break it down into glucose when it needs it if you are burning mor Continue reading >>

High Intense Exercise And Metformin?

High Intense Exercise And Metformin?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I was diagnosed 2 months ago with PCOS and High Insulin. Im on nutrition and i have to say i think am on a good way as im having my periods back every 28 days. Ive been excercising for 5 years now. High Intense exercise. Classes. Stong ones (lol you got the point) Im super fine and when the class starts i start too feel really weak. Since that started i usually stop a lot of times for few seconds and then continue. But the last time i was ready to fall down. It was the first time in years that i havent manage to finish a class. Also, i cant eat. Im preety full the whole time. When i force myself to eat i end up standing up from the chair and vomit. I googled it. but i only found that is good to have metformin and exercise together it brings good results. By the way. When i went for the first time to my doc 2 months ago she told me when the package of metformin is over to go do more blood test and go for a scan to see if we have any improvements. My pack will finish next week, i called her and she told me that i was mistaken and that she will see me in 4-5 months. Last edited by Sarofan; 04-30-2010 at 02:27 PM. Hi! I'm on Met, very athletic & workout hard core. I've never experienced what you described. Do you think it may be because you aren't eating enough? Continue reading >>

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

If you take insulin or another blood glucose-lowering medication, you are at risk for low blood sugar (usually defined as blood glucose < 65 mg/dl), or hypoglycemia, which can occur during or following physical activity. Low blood sugar can cause trembling, sweating, dizziness, blurred vision, impaired thinking, and even seizures and loss of consciousness. Exercise presents its own special challenges for managing blood sugar. Since any activity increases your body’s use of blood sugar, hypoglycemia can develop more easily. The more you understand about what makes your blood sugars go down (or sometimes up) during exercise, the easier it becomes to control and the more confident you can be about doing activities and staying in control of your diabetes. Much of your blood sugar response has to do with how much insulin is in your bloodstream. If your insulin levels are high during a physical activity, your muscles will take up more blood glucose (since muscle contractions themselves stimulate glucose uptake without insulin) and you’re more likely to end up with low blood sugars. You can even end up with late-onset hypoglycemia, which can occur from right after to up to 48 hours after you exercise. What’s important is to do your best to prevent lows before, during and after exercise by taking the steps listed below. Prevent Lows Before, During and After Exercise Learn how your body responds to exercise by checking your blood sugar levels before, (occasionally) during, and after exercise. If your blood sugar is near or below 70 mg/dl before you exercise, bring it back within normal range before you begin by consuming some carbohydrates. Always be prepared to correct a low by carrying a rapid-acting carbohydrate with you during exercise. Don’t assume you’ll be able Continue reading >>

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Exercise In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin and Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes Examining treatment modality interactions 1Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 2Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Canada 3Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 4Faculty of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 5Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Corresponding author: Normand G. Boul, [email protected] . Received 2010 Nov 29; Accepted 2011 Apr 7. Copyright 2011 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To determine the effect of metformin on the acute metabolic response to submaximal exercise, the effect of exercise on plasma metformin concentrations, and the interaction between metformin and exercise on the subsequent response to a standardized meal. Ten participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this randomized crossover study. Metformin or placebo was given for 28 days, followed by the alternate condition for 28 days. On the last 2 days of each condition, participants were assessed during a nonexercise and a subsequent exercise day. Exercise took place in the morning and involved a total of 35 min performed at three different submaximal intensities. Metformin increased heart rate and plasma lactate during exercise (both P 0.01) but lowered respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.03) without affecting total energy expenditure, which suggests increased fat oxidation. Metformin plasma Continue reading >>

Glumetza (metformin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Glumetza (metformin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Severe renal impairment (eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m2). Metabolic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis. Increased risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis in renal or hepatic impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (eg, cationic drugs), 65yrs of age, undergoing radiological contrast study, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, and excessive alcohol intake; discontinue if lactic acidosis occurs. Discontinue at time of, or prior to intravascular iodinated contrast imaging in patients with eGFR 3060mL/min/1.73m2, history of hepatic impairment, alcoholism, heart failure, or will be given intra-arterial contrast; reevaluate eGFR 48hrs after procedure and restart therapy if renally stable. Suspend therapy if dehydration occurs or before surgery. Avoid if clinical or lab evidence of hepatic disease. Assess renal function prior to starting and periodically thereafter; more frequently in elderly or if eGFR <60mL/min/1.73m2. Elderly, debilitated, uncompensated strenuous exercise, malnourished or deficient caloric intake, adrenal or pituitary insufficiency, or alcohol intoxication: increased risk of hypoglycemia. Monitor hematology (esp. serum Vit. B12 in susceptible patients). Pregnancy (Cat.B): not recommended. Nursing mothers. Increased risk of lactic acidosis with topiramate, other carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, zonisamide, acetazolamide, dichlorphenamide); monitor. Concomitant cationic drugs that interfere with renal tubular transport systems (eg, ranolazine, vandetanib, dolutegravir, cimetidine) may increase metformin levels; monitor. Avoid excessive alcohol intake (potentiates effects of metformin on lactate). Diuretics, steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blockers, isoniazid, nic Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin And Exercise Training, Alone Or In Association, On Cardio-pulmonary Performance And Quality Of Life In Insulin Resistance Patients

Effects Of Metformin And Exercise Training, Alone Or In Association, On Cardio-pulmonary Performance And Quality Of Life In Insulin Resistance Patients

Effects of metformin and exercise training, alone or in association, on cardio-pulmonary performance and quality of life in insulin resistance patients Cadeddu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 Metformin (MET) therapy exerts positive effects improving glucose tolerance and preventing the evolution toward diabetes in insulin resistant patients. It has been shown that adding MET to exercise training does not improve insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of MET and exercise training alone or in combination on maximal aerobic capacity and, as a secondary end-point on quality of life indexes in individuals with insulin resistance. 75 insulin resistant patients were enrolled and subsequently assigned to MET (M), MET with exercise training (MEx), and exercise training alone (Ex). 12-weeks of supervised exercise-training program was carried out in both Ex and MEx groups. Cardiopulmonary exercise test and SF-36 to evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) was performed at basal and after 12-weeks of treatment. Cardiopulmonary exercise test showed a significant increase of peak VO2 in Ex and MEx whereas M showed no improvement of peak VO2 ( VO2 [CI 95%] Ex +0.26 [0.47to 0.05] l/min; VO2 MEx +0.19 [0.33to 0.05] l/min; VO2 M -0.09 [-0.03to -0.15] l/min; M vs E p < 0.01; M vs MEx p < 0.01; MEx vs Ex p = ns). SF-36 highlighted a significant increase in general QoL index in the MEx (58.3 19 vs 77.3 16; p < 0.01) and Ex (62.1 17 vs 73.7 12; p < 0.005) groups. We evidenced that cardiopulmonary negative effects showed by MET therapy may be counterbalanced with the combination of exercise training. Given that exercise training associated with MET produced similar effects to exercise training alone in terms of maximal aerobic capacity and HRQo Continue reading >>

When Do You Time Your Exercise With Metformin?

When Do You Time Your Exercise With Metformin?

when do you time your exercise with Metformin? when do you time your exercise with Metformin? I've been googling, and most sites say I need to exercise, but they don't say when. I've been feeling slowed down since Friday, eating probably not enough, losing a little bit of weight. I am sure I need to exercise and eat more, which I am ready and willing to do, just trying to figure out when is best. Thanks. I exercise whenever I have time. In the evenings, morning or sometimes a walk at lunch. Many type 2's say that exercise increases their blood sugar. I know it does for me but I don't let that deter me. I figure I need 4 1 hour sessions a week. Sometimes I do more if I take a long bike ride but mostly it's pretty consistent. A1c 8.1 2008, 6.3 2009, 8.1 2010, 6.9 1/2011, 7.5 4/2011, 6.4 1/2012, 6.2 7/2012, 6.5 9/2013, 6.0 1/2014 D.D. Family Type 2 Diet and Exercise since 1997 Metformin is best taken with a meal. If you are on an extended release, you want it to hit your most needed time during its peak. Many people have liver dump issues in the morning, so taking it with your evening meal would be best, since the peak time of the medication would be in the morning...if you took the medication in the morning, it would be at is lowest and wearing off, if you took it with your breakfast. Exercise should be done when YOU can...because otherwise, you will not do it. I know many people that prefer to do it in the am...but, I am NOT a morning person, so I do it after work, and after dinner. Because I do walk after dinner, I can do a higher carb amount with that meal. The only disability in life is a bad attitude-Scott Hamilton. I think exercise is an individual thing. I always make sure I have a small snack and take my bg before I go out to walk or exercise. If I am below 90, I Continue reading >>

Why Exercise Timing Matters — But Not For The Reason You Think

Why Exercise Timing Matters — But Not For The Reason You Think

A recent study published online in October 2012 in the British Journal of Nutrition (and reported on in Diabetes In Control) attempted to address the issue of how timing of exercise relative to meal ingestion influences substrate balance and metabolic responses1. In that study, ten sedentary, overweight men with a mean age of 28 years undertook an hour of moderate walking either before or after eating breakfast with their fat balance and postprandial metabolism monitored afterwards. Not surprisingly, exercising at either time (compared to just resting) significantly lowered insulin responses. Moreover, since more total fat was oxidized during the 8.5-hour period subjects were followed (which included the exercise period) and blood levels of triglycerides (blood fats) remained lower following pre-breakfast exercise in particular, the authors suggested that there may be an advantage for body fat regulation and lipid metabolism gained by exercising before compared with after breakfast. The conclusions jumped to, based on studies like this, personally drive me crazy, especially when they are assumed to apply equally to people with diabetes (even though this study was done on overweight young men without diabetes). Despite the conclusions given in the article suggesting advantages in fat metabolism and weight loss, in actuality all the differences in calorie and substrate utilization over the ensuing 8.5 hours post-exercise were entirely accounted for by energy use during the exercise sessions themselves, not differences following the activity. In other words, walking before breakfast caused them to use (slightly) more fat during the activity — not surprisingly — than walking after their morning meal. When interviewed about these findings, Dr. Gill apparently said that w Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

Is It Bad To Take Metformin In Tandem With Exercise?

Is It Bad To Take Metformin In Tandem With Exercise?

Is it bad to take metformin in tandem with exercise? My doctor recently put me on metformin because I have insulin resistance that has been uncontrollable with monitoring my diet and exercising more. I have had serious GI upset since starting it, so I haven't been exercising like I usually do. My blood sugars have been staying below 150 with only 500 metformin. 2... show more My doctor recently put me on metformin because I have insulin resistance that has been uncontrollable with monitoring my diet and exercising more. I have had serious GI upset since starting it, so I haven't been exercising like I usually do. My blood sugars have been staying below 150 with only 500 metformin. 2 units of insulin brought me from a 170 to an 80 yesterday, and I haven't taken any insulin today...will exercising with the metformin make my blood sugars go really low? if so, how do i make sure they stay up? just, like, a smoothie before? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Most people will not have low blood sugar with exercise if they are taking only metformin, because the metformin does not prevent the body from regulating blood sugar, and the body will keep it up. In combination with insulin, however, excercising with metformin may make you low- the insulin that you inject keeps working even as you exercise and don't need it. For most people, a smoothie before exercise would be overkill in terms of raising blood sugar, but you will have to experiment for yourself. Test before and after and during if you exercise for long, and see what happens. The Metformin simply helped your cells better utilize the insulin. The insulin, strictly speaking, is what dropped your blood sugar so significantly. Metformin on its own almost never causes hypoglycemia. Its primary action Continue reading >>

Risk Of Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis

Risk Of Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis

Risk of Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis Most of us are familiar with intense exercising or vigorously participating in a physical activity where our muscles begin to fatigue and a burning sensation sets in. This burning signals a buildup of lactic acid in our muscles. The accumulation of this lactic acid is a normal and healthy process, however, there are some cases where high levels of a lactic acid in the bloodstream (lactic acidosis) can be dangerous to your health and even life threatening. Although the percentage is very small, recent studies 1 have linked lactic acidosis as a potential side effect or complication of diabetes. When we exercise, our bodies use sugar (glucose) as a source of fuel to produce energy for the muscles. During this process, our muscles require more oxygen to deal with the increased workload from exercising. When our muscles cant get enough oxygen to meet the increased demands, a substance called lactate is produced. Lactate (lactic acid) is a natural defense mechanism designed to allow the muscles to continue to breakdown the sugar (glucose) for energy. Unfortunately, this is only a short term solution kind of like running on fumes when your car is out of gas. Without enough oxygen, the lactic acid can build up and spill into the blood stream. In extreme cases, like lactic acidosis, there is potential for serious health problems. Is Lactic Acid a Good Thing or Bad Thing? Contrary to what some believe, lactic acid is a good thing as it efficiently provides a short term source of fuel for energy. Moreover, it can also be used as a signal to indicate that our bodies are performing near maximum limitations. For athletes, they train to push the limits of lactic acid buildup and to improve their athletic performance during high levels of l Continue reading >>

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