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Metformin And Psoriasis

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Metformin In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (systemic Treatment Cohort) Singh S, Bhansali A - Indian J Endocr Metab

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Metformin In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (systemic Treatment Cohort) Singh S, Bhansali A - Indian J Endocr Metab

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None Background: Psoriasis has been found to be associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors. Metformin treatment showed improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and hyperinsulinemia. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of metformin in psoriasis patients with MS. Materials and Methods: This was a single-center, parallel-group, randomized, open-label study with blinded end point assessment of metformin (1000 mg once daily for 12 weeks; n = 20) and placebo (n = 18) in psoriasis patients with MS. Total sample size was 38 participants. Results: Statistically significant improvement was observed in mean percentage change in erythema, scaling, and induration (ESI) (P = 0.048) in metformin as compared to placebo while mean percentage change in psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) and physician global assessment (PGA) scores was not significant (PASI - P = 0.215, PGA - P = 0.070). There was a statistically significant difference in percentage of parameters of MS improved following 12 weeks of treatment in metformin (19%) as compared to placebo (8.9%) group (P = 0.046). Statistically significant difference in percentage of patients achieving 75% reduction in ESI scores (P = 0.024). Significant improvement was observed in mean weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in metformin group as compared to placebo. Improvement in BMI, fasting plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, LDL, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol was statistically significant in metformin group over the period of 12 weeks. There was no significant difference in adverse events in two grou Continue reading >>

The Drug Metformin And Psoriasis

The Drug Metformin And Psoriasis

Have any diabetics with P on this forum noticed any link between taking the drug Metformin and having their P get worse? ** Originally posted by kaitlinmarie35 ** I couldn't get to the article. It said I needed to login. =( But, personally I've been taking Metformin for about 3ish years and don't believe it has had any effect on my psoriasis. I did have my first super severe outbreak (in about 10ish years) after being on the drug for over 6 months, but the outbreak was triggered by a food allergy. I take a God awful amount of medications and I saw my psoriasis worsen this summer after starting to taking the drug Byetta. But, the Byetta has pretty much changed my life and how I live with my Diabetes, so there was no way that I was going to give it up. I just ended up on Enbrel instead. This discussion is closed to comments. To start a new discussion in this community, please log in here . Join many others who understand what you're going through and are making important decisions about their health. Continue reading >>

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Metformin In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (systemic Treatment Cohort)

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Metformin In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (systemic Treatment Cohort)

Randomized Placebo Control Study of Metformin in Psoriasis Patients with Metabolic Syndrome (Systemic Treatment Cohort) Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India 1Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, Punjab, India Address for correspondence: Dr. Surjit Singh, Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. E-mail: [email protected]_ybmhes Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : 2017 Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Psoriasis has been found to be associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors. Metformin treatment showed improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and hyperinsulinemia. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of metformin in psoriasis patients with MS. This was a single-center, parallel-group, randomized, open-label study with blinded end point assessment of metformin (1000 mg once daily for 12 weeks; n = 20) and placebo (n = 18) in psoriasis patients with MS. Total sample size was 38 participants. Statistically significant improvement was observed in mean percentage change in erythema, scaling, and induration (ESI) (P = 0.048) in metformin as compared to placebo while mean percentage change in psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) and physician global a Continue reading >>

Assessing The Efficacy And Safety Of Metformin In Treatment Of Moderate Psoriasis

Assessing The Efficacy And Safety Of Metformin In Treatment Of Moderate Psoriasis

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Assessing the Efficacy and Safety of Metformin in Treatment of Moderate Psoriasis The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02644954 Verified December 2015 by Dr. Sunil Dogra, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research. Recruitment status was: Not yet recruiting Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research Information provided by (Responsible Party): Dr. Sunil Dogra, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Psoriasis vulgaris is a common, chronic, relapsing skin disease characterized by predominant involvement of skin, nails and joints. Recent advances in its patho-physiology have shifted the notion of psoriasis from that of a 'disease of the skin' to a 'T-cell mediated systemic disease'. Better understanding of its pathogenesis and co-morbidities along with the development of novel therapeutics like biological response modifiers has changed the way dermatologists approach the management of psoriasis. Based on the extent of involvement and effect on the quality of life, psoriasis may be mild to moderate in severity. This in turn forms the basis of treatment in majority of the patients. Topical therapies like coal tar, calcipotriol and corticosteroids are sufficient for mild and localized psoriasis. In more widespread or severe forms that are associated with s Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Medication And Psoriasis

Medication And Psoriasis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community can any one tell me if any of the medication i am taking at the moment can course my psoriasis to go wild ? since have been taking metformin 500mg 4 a day glicazide 2 aday asprin 1a day and ramapril 10mg 1 a day i am also about to start on byetta . my psoriasis was mild before i started all these tablets now its goin wild all over my body apart from my head and face thankfully,,,,, any info would be welcome is any one else having the same effects ? All three of your meds can cause skin reactions.Please discuss this with your doctor and review your medication. I don't know about the medications but i have noticed that my psoriasis goes a little crazy when my BG levels change from what they normally are. eg. i've been trying to get my BG down to single figures from between 9- 13 and its gone a bit mad atm. if you haven't got any already get some cream from your dr, it'll do the trick.if you wanna know more feel free to pm me i have had psoriasis on my nose and upper lip for the last 20 years it would come and go but since ive started taking metformin it has gone bananas and i am getting no break from it at all and you should see it after i go swimming, hoping to see a specialist well thank you all for your replys ,its a right pain, but i guess we just have to grin and bare it. i have been useing all different types of creams from my doc over the years but not with that much sucsess i found it went away with diet changes when i lost 7 stone but as soon as i stopped the stric Continue reading >>

Metformin - For The Dermatologist Bubna Ak - Indian J Pharmacol

Metformin - For The Dermatologist Bubna Ak - Indian J Pharmacol

Metformin though primarily an antidiabetic drug, has found to play an important role in a number of cutaneous disorders. Because of its role in improving hyperinsulinemia, it has proven beneficial in hormonal acne, hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) and acanthosis nigricans. Its antiandrogenic properties further serve as an add-on to the conventional management of hirsutism associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Very recently, systemic usage of metformin for psoriasis and cutaneous malignancies has shown promising results. Interestingly, metformin has also been topically used in hyperpigmentary disorders with pertinent levels of improvement and happens to be the most recent addition to the list of dermatologic indications. Though an oral hypoglycemic agent to begin with, metformin today has proven to be a boon for dermatologists. Keywords:Hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinemia, hyperpigmentary disorders, metformin, skin cancer Bubna AK. Metformin - For the dermatologist. Indian J Pharmacol 2016;48:4-10 Bubna AK. Metformin - For the dermatologist. Indian J Pharmacol [serial online] 2016 [cited2018 Jun 16];48:4-10. Available from: (dimethylbiguanide) today is a widely used drug prescribed for diabetic patients. The history of metformin dates back to the usage of the herb Galega officinalis. This herb was found to be rich in a substance called guanidine with blood-glucose-lowering properties, which later was discovered to be the chemical basis of metformin. Though an antidiabetic drug to begin with, metformin has proven to be a drug of importance, in a number of cutaneous indications. This review will discuss the dermatologic perspective of metformin. orally, metformin has a bioavailability of 40-60%. Within 6 h of drug intake, gastrointestinal absorption is complete. Gastro Continue reading >>

Will You Have Psoriasis With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Psoriasis With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 52 year old woman who takes Sertraline, Elavil, Ranitidine, Co-codamol NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Current And Emerging Medications For Psoriasis

Current And Emerging Medications For Psoriasis

Current and emerging medications for psoriasis Current and emerging medications for psoriasis Psoriasis is a complex immune-mediated disease that can manifest in the skin and joints. Psoriasis is a complex immune-mediated disease that affects approximately 120 million people globally and requires chronic management.1 The condition manifests itself in the skin, joints, or both, and exhibits associated comorbidities that increase risk for early death, including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, psoriatic arthritis, depression, anxiety, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Crohn's disease, and lymphoma.2 Physicians should encourage lifestyle changes to reduce modifiable cardiovascular risk factors , such as smoking, which has been shown to independently increase risk of onset and exacerbation of psoriasis. Excessive alcohol intake has been reported in up to one-third of patients with psoriasis, likely due to psychologic distress. Excess alcohol ingestion is also a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.3 As emerging research illustrates its increasing complexity, psoriasis is now considered a systemic inflammatory disorder.2 Clinically, there are 5 types of psoriasis: plaque psoriasis, guttate or eruptive psoriasis, inverse psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, and erythrodermic psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is the most common form, with monomorphic, well-demarcated erythematous plaques under a silvery scale, typically on the scalp and extensor surfaces. Guttate psoriasis exhibits tear-drop shaped lesions with scale. Inverse psoriasis is found in the intertriginous or flexural areas. Pustular psoriasis can present as either palmoplantar pustulosis or as the serious generalized pustular psoriasis. Any form can evolve into erythrodermic psoriasis, a rare and serious complicat Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Psoriasis

The Link Between Diabetes And Psoriasis

I remember seeing television ads as a child proclaiming “the heartbreak of psoriasis.” And lately, I’ve been seeing ads for new medications that can treat this condition. I’ve always thought of psoriasis as an annoying skin condition, but didn’t realize that it’s linked to inflammation. It’s also linked to a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Read on to learn more. What is psoriasis? According to the Psoriasis Foundation, “psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin.” These patches are usually found on the elbows, knees, and scalp, but they can be anywhere on the body. The dry, flaky skin is a result of a rapid buildup of skin cells, triggered by inflammatory chemicals. Psoriasis is a fairly common condition, affected between 1% and 3% of the U.S. population. It can also occur in children, although it’s more common in people between the ages of 15 and 35. What are the signs and symptoms? Psoriasis can appear as red bumps that blend into each other, forming scaly patches, called plaque psoriasis. Again, they’re more likely to form on the elbows, knees, lower back, or scalp, or on areas that are exposed to a lot of friction. These patches are silvery in color and are often itchy and painful. One way that psoriasis is diagnosed is if pinpoint spots of blood form after pulling off one of the patches — this is called the Auspitz sign. Psoriasis can also appear in the genital regions, between the buttocks, or on the back of the knees, called inverse psoriasis. This shows up as red, smooth, shiny lesions. Guttate psoriasis appears as small, dot-like lesions that are often triggered by a strep infection, such as strep throat. This type of psoriasis can start in childhood or in young adulthood. Pustular pso Continue reading >>

Metformin Psoriasis Causes And Reviews

Metformin Psoriasis Causes And Reviews

This is a Metformin Hcl side effect report of a patient (weight:NA) from UNITED STATES, suffering from the following symptoms/conditions: NA, who was treated with Metformin Hcl (dosage:NA, start time: Jan 01, 2009), combined with: , and developed a serious reaction and a Psoriasis side effect. The patient presented with: which developed after the beginning of treatment. This side effect report can indicate a possible existence of increased vulnerability to Metformin Hcl treatment in patients suffering from NA, resulting in Psoriasis. Injection Site Erythema, Psoriasis, Fatigue, Injection Site Pain, Skin Exfoliation A 66-year-old female patient (weight: NA) from UNITED STATES with the following symptoms: diabetes mellitus , pain ,psoriasis started Metformin Hcl treatment (dosage: NA) on Jan 01, 2009. Soon after starting Metformin Hcl treatment, the consumer experienced several side effects, including: The patient was hospitalized. Although all drugs are carefully tested before they are licensed for use, they carry potential side effect risks. Some side effects, such as Psoriasis, may become evident only after a product is in use by the general population. Epistaxis, Psoriasis, Graft Haemorrhage, Blood Creatinine Increased, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Ulcer Haemorrhage, Oropharyngeal Pain, Abscess, Intervertebral Disc Protrusion This is a Metformin side effect report of a 64-year-old patient (weight: NA) from UNITED STATES. The patient developed the following symptoms/conditions: NA and was treated with Metformin (dosage: NA) starting Dec 01, 2008. Concurrently used drugs: . Metformin Hcl dosage: NA. Additional drugs used at the same time: This is a Metformin Hydrochloride side effect report of a 38-year-old female patient (weight:NA) from UNITED STATES, suffering Continue reading >>

Sat0384metformin: A Valid Add-on Drug In The Treatment Of Psoriatic Arthritis - Randomized Controlled Trial | Annals Of The Rheumatic Diseases

Sat0384metformin: A Valid Add-on Drug In The Treatment Of Psoriatic Arthritis - Randomized Controlled Trial | Annals Of The Rheumatic Diseases

SAT0384 Metformin: A Valid ADD-ON Drug in the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis - Randomized Controlled Trial 1Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria 2Biochemistry, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria, Egypt Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease. The chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis and PsA predisposes patients to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS is associated with systemic inflammation and proinflammatory cytokines. Biochemical evidence suggests that methotrexate (MTX) and metformin (MET) may share a common cellular target, the AMP-activated protein kinase. Clinical observations and experimental results argue for an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant property of MET. Objectives A randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of metformin as add-on therapy to MTX compared to MTX after 24 weeks in patients with PsA. Methods The study randomized 56 patients with a diagnosis of PsA defined by the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis group. Patients with a history of a cardiovascular event and diabetics were excluded. Of the 56 patients, 28 were active. Active disease defined as 6 tender joints, 6 swollen joints, psoriasis area and severity index score (PASI) 10, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) >28 mm/hr and C-reactive protein (CRP) 10mg/dl. Body mass index (BMI) and classic cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Blood samples were analysed for glucose, lipid profile, ESR, hsCRP, proinflammatory cytokines; tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-17. The homeostasis model assessment model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used. The patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive 500m Continue reading >>

Psoriasiform Drug Eruption Due To Metformin Hydrochloride: A Case Report

Psoriasiform Drug Eruption Due To Metformin Hydrochloride: A Case Report

Psoriasiform drug eruption due to metformin hydrochloride: A case report Psoriasiform drug eruption associated with metformin hydrochloride: A case report Rafet Koca MD1, H Cevdet Altinyazar MD1, Sibel Yenidnya MD2, and Nilgn Solak Tekin MD1 From the School of Medicine(1) Department of Dermatology and (2) Department of Pathology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak, Turkey. [email protected] Multiple erythematous, scaly macules and papules present on the anterior cervical region, upper extremities, and trunk. Routine laboratory investigations including complete blood cell count, liver and renal function tests, urinalysis, Ig G, IgA, IgM levels, complement 3 and 4 levels, and antistreptolysin-O titers were within normal limits; a pharyngeal culture was negative for pathological microorganisms. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 10 mm/h (normal: 0-15 mm/h). Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test was negative. No clinical evidence of infection was found. We performed a patch test and a scratch test with MH, and the results were negative. The histological findings of the skin biopsy specimen included hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, loss of granular layer, irregular acanthosis of the epidermis, and a perivascular infiltrate composed of mononuclear cells in the upper dermis. The epidermis, with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, and irregular acanthosis; a perivascular infiltrate composed of mononuclear cells at the upper dermis (H&E, 10x10). The epidermis, with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, and loss of granular layer (H&E, 10x40). After discontinuation of MH, the skin lesions disappeared within 5 weeks without any oral or topical treatment. No relapse of the cutaneous eruption was observed during 4 months following cessation of MH. We performed a ch Continue reading >>

Metformin Effecting Psoriasis?

Metformin Effecting Psoriasis?

I was wondering if anyone has had their psoriasis worsen while taking Metformin? I have had a considerable amount of coverage (70+ %) for decades. My flare triggers, besides an actual illness, have been sugar and wheat. If I discipline myself and avoid those items I can eliminate most of my psoriasis. However, a few months ago I went for a week feeling very strange. Since everyone on my dad's side of the family is/was diabetic, that was the first thing I suspected. I bought a ReliOn test kit where I work and my blood sugar reading was 411! I made a Dr.'s appt for the following week. Within that week I followed a strict low GI/diabetic friendly diet and got my numbers down to the low 200's. When I met my Dr., she put me on Metformin, saying I could probably come off it entirely in a year or so if I controlled my diet. They did an A1C test that averages the previous three month's blood sugar range. Dr said the "normal" number they want for a non-diabetic is 5.6. Mine was a 5.7, so she thinks something specific spiked my sugars to push them so high, since my A1C didn't show a previous trend for elevated blood sugar. In other words, prior to that week it appears my blood sugars had been normal. Since then my readings have been normal, even when I forget to take the medicine. I admit I'm terrible at taking meds. The Metformin is the only prescription I take. Twice I have forgotten to take it for two to four days, without any notable increase in my blood sugar when I test it. As a matter of fact I forgot to take it for three days over Thanksgiving, with no real increase in my blood sugar levels (and I test 3 - 4 times a day). However, since starting the Metformin, my psoriasis has blown up! I have been in a continuous serious flare since starting it, and it's spreading fast. Continue reading >>

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Insulin Sensitizers (metformin And Pioglitazone) In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (topical Treatment Cohort)

Randomized Placebo Control Study Of Insulin Sensitizers (metformin And Pioglitazone) In Psoriasis Patients With Metabolic Syndrome (topical Treatment Cohort)

Abstract Increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) is observed in psoriasis. Metformin has shown improvement in cardiovascular risk factors while pioglitazone demonstrated anti proliferative, anti-inflammatory and anti angiogenic effects. Study objective is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Insulin sensitizers (metformin and pioglitazone) in psoriasis patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). Single centre, parallel group, randomized, study of metformin, pioglitazone and placebo in psoriasis patients with MS. Statistically significant improvement was observed in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Erythema, Scaling and Induration (ESI) and Physician global assessment (PGA) scores in pioglitazone (p values – PASI = 0.001, ESI = 0.002, PGA = 0.008) and metformin groups (p values – PASI = 0.001, ESI = 0.016, PGA = 0.012) as compared to placebo. There was statistically significant difference in percentage of patients achieving 75 % reduction in PASI and ESI scores in metformin (p value – PASI = 0.001, ESI = 0.001) and pioglitazone groups (p vaue – PASI = 0.001, ESI = 0.001). Significant improvement was observed in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and triglycerides levels in metformin and pioglitazone arms. Significant improvement was noted in weight, BMI, waist circumference, FPG, triglycerides and total cholesterol after 12 weeks of treatment with metformin while pioglitazone showed improvement in FPG, triglyceride levels, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. There was no difference in pattern of adverse drug reaction in three groups. Insulin sensitizers have shown improvement in the parameters of MS as well as disease severity in psoriasis patients. Background Psoriasis is a chronic, Continue reading >>

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