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Metformin And Progesterone Side Effects

Hrc Fertility, Metformin Drug & Infertility Treatment - Huntington Reproductive Center - California Fertility Treatment

Hrc Fertility, Metformin Drug & Infertility Treatment - Huntington Reproductive Center - California Fertility Treatment

Metformin reduces blood sugar levels and is approved by the FDA for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In women with infertility due to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , trials found metformin plus Clomid to be more effective than Clomid alone in ovulation induction. Continued metformin treatment may establish regular menstrual cycles in women with PCOS. Metformin may also decrease the miscarriage risk associated with PCOS. These findings are preliminary, based on two small studies. One small study found metformin might also decrease the incidence of gestational diabetes in PCOS women. The safety of metformin's use in pregnancy has not been established. For most women with PCOS trying to conceive, the first medication option to induce ovulation is still Clomid . However, metformin is arguably the first choice in women with impaired glucose tolerance and certainly in women with type 2 diabetes. Metformin has many actions, the main being suppression of endogenous glucose production by the liver. Metformin does not cause hypoglycemia, weight gain, unfavorable alteration of lipids, nor increase insulin secretion. Unlike drugs such as Avandia, metformin does not cause weight gain, fluid retention, or potential idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Instead, metformin improves the effectiveness of insulin while maintaining or even decreasing insulin levels. Metformin decreases both basal and postprandial glucose levels, without the danger of hypoglycemia. Glucophage promotes weight loss and favorable changes in the lipid profile. Metformin is a very safe medication when used properly and given to healthy women. It is contraindicated in women with renal compromise, liver disease, and at risk for lactic acidosis. Gastrointestinal side effects such as diarrhea or nausea are initially very Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Early Pregnancy Loss In The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effects Of Metformin On Early Pregnancy Loss In The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common form of female infertility in the United States. In addition to poor conception rates, pregnancy loss rates are high (30–50%) during the first trimester. We hypothesized that hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance contributes to early pregnancy loss in the syndrome, and that decreasing hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance with metformin during pregnancy would reduce the rate of early pregnancy loss. We conducted a retrospective study of all women with polycystic ovary syndrome who were seen in an academic endocrinology clinic within the past 4.5 yr and who became pregnant during that time. Sixty-five women received metformin during pregnancy (metformin group) and 31women did not (control group). The early pregnancy loss rate in the metformin group was 8.8% (6 of 68 pregnancies), as compared with 41.9% (13 of 31 pregnancies) in the control group (P < 0.001). In the subset of women in each group with a prior history of miscarriage, the early pregnancy loss rate was 11.1% (4 of 36 pregnancies) in the metformin group, as compared with 58.3% (7 of 12 pregnancies) in the control group (P = 0.002). Metformin administration during pregnancy reduces first-trimester pregnancy loss in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. Suppression of spermatogenesis to azoospermia is the goal of hormonal male contraception based on T combined with gestagens. The combination of the long-acting T, ester testosterone undecanoate (TU), with norethisterone (NET) enanthate (E) showed high efficacy. In the present study, we tested the validity of this approach by varying the NET dose and mode of application. The aim of the study was to achieve high rates of suppression of spermatogenesis as reflected by sperm counts, monitor gonadotropins as well as other Continue reading >>

Metformin And Progesterone In Pcos?

Metformin And Progesterone In Pcos?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I am looking for advice regarding taking Metformin and/or progesterone for any or all of the pregnancy? I am around 6 weeks pregnant right now. First pregnancy I took Metformin and oral progesterone for 13 weeks and carried to term, gained 55 lbs but no GD. Second pregnancy was advised to stop all the meds and had m/c at 10 weeks. This is my third pregnancy and really trying not to take chances. My RE doesn't advise taking the meds -- have a call into OB to see her opinion. I have the meds at home (oral metformin and progesterone suppositories) but have been off Metformin all week due to vacation/traveling and having constant cramping and diarrhea from it. What has been your experience? Is it helpful to be on Met or Progesterone? Decrease m/c risk? Decrease weight gain?? Any advice appreciated. TTC #1 for 2 years, Clomid, injections, Metformin. Pregnant off all meds July 2007 --> perfect baby girl born 4/08 Hidden Content TTC #2 since 2010 -- Letrozole and HCG triggers + Metformin My OB wants me to take my metformin through the first 12 weeks. A few weeks ago, I started having a really hard time with it- all of the original symptoms came back and I was having a hard time taking it. When I got pregnant, I was taking 1500mg/day. They cut me back to 1000mg/day when all of the side effects came back. I'm scared to stop taking it, but my OB says that more recent studies show that it is helpful in the first 12 weeks, but not a lot of coorelation to show decreased risk of miscarriage after 12 weeks. I know there are Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Dietary Management For Pcos

Weight Loss And Dietary Management For Pcos

Weight loss and dietary management for PCOS ROBERT L. BARBIERI, MD (EDITORIAL; APRIL 2017) Weight loss and dietary management for PCOS I enjoyed Dr. Barbieris editorial on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but I feel that first-line management for PCOS should be weight loss and diet modifications that include instructions on decreasing carbohydrates and insulin spikes. A 5% to 10% weight loss should produce a return of cycles. Of course, metformin and spironolactone have a place for added treatment/prevention of acne and diabetes. Metformin and progesterone for PCOS-related infertility I have been using Beyaz and Yaz for several years in my PCOS patients for the lower androgenic activity of the drospirenone based on the same assumption and its similarity to spironolactone. I have gotten great results with metformin 1,500 mg daily and, for those who desire fertility, cycling once a month for 10 days with progesterone. My own daughter was able to conceive in just 3 months of therapy. PCOS is extremely common in our region, probably due to the high obesity rate. I saw many more cases here than I ever thought I would when I was training. Check insulin levels in PCOS patients before giving metformin? Thank you for the very nice article regarding PCOS treatment. Does Dr. Barbieri routinely check insulin levels on patients before treating with metformin and does he require abnormal insulin levels to be present before initiating treatment? The article suggested that using the listed risk factors is sufficient. Additionally, does he perform glucose-insulin testing? If so, what is the protocol used? I have used fasting levels and 2-hour post 75-g glucose-drink testing as well. What is the best approach? As usual, Dr. Barbieri has provided a thorough, concise, and practical overv Continue reading >>

Metformin For Endometrial Hyperplasia

Metformin For Endometrial Hyperplasia

Is metformin an effective and safe treatment for people with endometrial hyperplasia ? Endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the womb) is a common cancer that affects the reproductive organs in women worldwide. Endometrial hyperplasia is a precancerous condition in women that can lead to endometrial cancer, if left untreated. Successful treatment of women with endometrial hyperplasia can prevent endometrial cancer. Endometrial hyperplasia is usually treated by providing progesterone hormone tablets, inserting the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena Coil) into the womb, advising overweight women to lose weight, or performing a hysterectomy for women who do not want any future pregnancy. However, progesterone tablets are associated with side effects in up to 84% of women, and this can prevent women from completing treatment. Also, progesterone tablets do not always work, and endometrial hyperplasia can return in up to 14% to 30% of women after treatment. The Mirena Coil is associated with irregular vaginal bleeding in up to 82% of women, and many women find it painful to use or otherwise unacceptable. Therefore, an alternative treatment for endometrial hyperplasia is required. Metformin, an oral tablet that usually is used to treat diabetes, has been shown to cure endometrial hyperplasia in some human studies. Although people taking metformin may experience side effects, treatment is usually well tolerated. If women experience fewer side effects when taking metformin rather than progesterone tablets, and if metformin effectively treats endometrial hyperplasia , then compliance will be better and the cure rate will improve. This could reduce the number of women who end up with endometrial cancer. However, the effectiveness and safety of metformin used to trea Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Treatment On Luteal Phase Progesterone Concentration In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effects Of Metformin Treatment On Luteal Phase Progesterone Concentration In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Braz J Med Biol Res, November 2004, Volume 37(11) 1637-1644 Effects of metformin treatment on luteal phase progesterone concentration in polycystic ovary syndrome K.J. Meenakumari2, S. Agarwal1, A. Krishna2 and L.K. Pandey1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Medical Sciences, and 2Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India The causes of luteal phase progesterone deficiency in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are not known. To determine the possible involvement of hyperinsulinemia in luteal phase progesterone deficiency in women with PCOS, we examined the relationship between progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and insulin during the luteal phase and studied the effect of metformin on luteal progesterone levels in PCOS. Patients with PCOS (19 women aged 18-35 years) were treated with metformin (500 mg three times daily) for 4 weeks prior to the test cycle and throughout the study period, and submitted to ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate. Blood samples were collected from control (N = 5, same age range as PCOS women) and PCOS women during the late follicular (one sample) and luteal (3 samples) phases and LH, insulin and progesterone concentrations were determined. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Duncan's test and Karl Pearson's coefficient of correlation (r). The endocrine study showed low progesterone level (4.9 ng/ml) during luteal phase in the PCOS women as compared with control (21.6 ng/ml). A significant negative correlation was observed between insulin and progesterone (r = -0.60; P < 0.01) and between progesterone and LH (r = -0.56; P < 0.05) concentrations, and a positive correlation (r = 0.83; P < 0.001) was observed between LH and insulin. The study further demonstrated a sig Continue reading >>

Pcos: Metformin And Progesterone

Pcos: Metformin And Progesterone

Just found out I have low progesterone and high insulin levels. My RE wants to start me on Metformin & Progesterone. Does anyone have any advice? Feedback? Have you ever taken Metformin? Does it help with fertility? Is there any hope?????? Good luck with metformin. It was so hard on my tummy. I would be at work and my tummy was rumbling and I would have to run to the bathroom. I've read about positive outcomes but I've never experienced any. My friend was on it for 6 months and got preggo naturally so there is hope Yeah, I can't take stand the side effects either. It's horrendous. All day long diarrhea and nausea. I even ended up paying extra to try the time release capsules and same effect whether I ate healthy or not. I ended up just not using it... I can't spend my life in the bathroom. I've been on metformin for years and don't have any problems. They did scale me up on it slowly increasing the dose every couple of weeks so that might help. I am on a high dose now and still don't have periods without help but I can ovulate with drugs. They say it helps so I go with that. What are you taking for ovulation? Clomid? I take metformin. I take 1000mgs a night. I started taking it when I was first trying to get pregnant. I wod take it then stop then take then stop. I wasn't on it faithfully. Fast forward 8 years later. My second ivf doctor prescribed it to me. I took faithfully and now have a beautiful 10mo old daughter. I also did other things such as acupuncture too. I was 41 at the time I started taking it faithfully. I believe it helped the quality of my eggs also. The side effects will lessen. You will learn what foods irritate you and what don't. You will also learn where all the bathrooms are when you first start taking them. Usually it is high sugar, like icing fo Continue reading >>

Impact Of Metformin On Reproductive Tissues: An Overview From Gametogenesis To Gestation

Impact Of Metformin On Reproductive Tissues: An Overview From Gametogenesis To Gestation

Go to: Metformin is an oral anti-hyperglycemic drug that acts as an insulin sensitizer in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. It has also been widely used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and gestational diabetes. This drug has been shown to activate a protein kinase called 5' AMP-activated protein kinase or AMPK. AMPK is present in many tissues making metformin’s effect multi factorial. However as metformin crosses the placenta, its use during pregnancy raises concerns regarding potential adverse effects on the mother and fetus. The majority of reports suggest no significant adverse effects or teratogenicity. However, disconcerting reports of male mouse offspring that were exposed to metformin in utero that present with a reduction in testis size, seminiferous tubule size and in Sertoli cell number suggest that we do not understand the full suite of effects of metformin. In addition, recent molecular evidence is suggesting an epigenetic effect of metformin which could explain some of the long-term effects reported. Nevertheless, the data are still insufficient to completely confirm or disprove negative effects of metformin. The aims of this review are to provide a summary of the safety of metformin in various aspects of sexual reproduction, the use of metformin by gestating mothers, and its possible side-effects on offspring from women who are administered metformin during pregnancy. Go to: Introduction Metformin is the most widely used drug for reproductive abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and also the oldest insulin sensitizer in the therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Its action reduces hepatic glucose output, increases tissue insulin sensitivity and enhances peripheral glucose uptake, resulting in lower c Continue reading >>

Poems & Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician

Poems & Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician

Metformin Increases Fertility in Patients with PCOS Am Fam Physician.2005Dec15;72(12):2530-2532. Clinical Question: Is metformin (Glucophage) more effective than clomiphene (Clomid) for improving fertility in nonobese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Study Design: Randomized controlled trial (double-blinded) Synopsis: Metformin and clomiphene have been used to increase fertility in women with PCOS. This is the first study to evaluate the medications head-to-head. One hundred women between 20 and 34 years of age with a body mass index lower than 30 kg per m2 were randomly assigned (concealed allocation) to receive metformin 850 mg two times per day or clomiphene 150 mg three times per day. Each patient also received placebos of the opposite drug. Before starting the medications, the patients received a progesterone challenge, and medication was started on the third day of progesterone-induced menstruation. The main outcome, pregnancy rate, was assessed via intention to treat. Five patients receiving metformin and three receiving clomiphene dropped out and were not included in the analysis. At the end of six months of treatment, 31 patients (69 percent) taking metformin became pregnant compared with 16 (34 percent) taking clomiphene. If all the patients lost to follow-up in the clomiphene group became pregnant and none of those taking metformin did, the pregnancy rate would still be significantly higher with metformin. Three women would need to be treated with metformin instead of clomiphene for six months for one additional woman to become pregnant (95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 6.9). The rate of side effects was similar in each group (approximately 20 percent), and one patient in each group dropped out because of side effects. Bottom Line: In nonobese wom Continue reading >>

Metformin And Prometrium Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Metformin And Prometrium Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Metformin As A New Therapy For Endometriosis, Its Effects On Both Clinical Picture And Cytokines Profile - Sciencedirect

Metformin As A New Therapy For Endometriosis, Its Effects On Both Clinical Picture And Cytokines Profile - Sciencedirect

Volume 17, Issue 4 , December 2012, Pages 262-267 Metformin as a new therapy for endometriosis, its effects on both clinical picture and cytokines profile Author links open overlay panel Ashraf AhmedFodaa Open Access funded by Middle East Fertility Society Metformin has both anti-inflammatory properties and a modulatory effect on ovarian steroid production. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have yet examined the effects of metformin therapy on patients with endometriosis. To determine the effects of metformin therapy on the patients complaints and on the serum levels of some cytokines. Sixty-nine infertile patients were diagnosed by diagnostic laparoscopy to have stages 1 & 2 endometriosis. They were subdivided into a control group and a treated group. Analysis of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF levels using ELISA kits. The effects of metformin therapy on the serum IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF levels after 3 and 6months were compared with the control group (non-treated cases). Metformin therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the patients complaints (P<0.01) and in the serum levels of IL-6, IL-8 & VEGF. Metformin therapy in patients with endometriosis resulted in a significant reduction in the symptomatic cases, increased chance of pregnancy, and a decrease in the levels of serum cytokines, suggesting that it may have a therapeutic potential as an anti-endometriotic drug. Continue reading >>

Progesterone For Pcos: Know How It Works & Common Side Effects

Progesterone For Pcos: Know How It Works & Common Side Effects

Home / Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome / Progesterone For PCOS: Know How It Works & Common Side Effects Progesterone For PCOS: Know How It Works & Common Side Effects If theres one defining chemicalthat differentiates women from men, it has to be progesterone. Progesterone is a hormone a chemical messenger that affects almost every tissue in the female body. In women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, or PCOS, progesterone levels are low. And this leads to a variety of problems including highly irregular periods and difficulty in getting pregnant. Doctors often prescribe natural (the term is open to interpretation) or bio-identical (a glorified term for synthetic, to make it feel safe) hormones to regulate irregular periods. They mimic the changes that the woman undergoes naturally to become pregnant. The jury is still out on the efficacy and safety of these methods. But while artificial progesterone is very similar in structure to the natural molecule, it is not 100% similar. Sadly, even small changes can cause side effects and future health complications. How Progesterone Therapy Helps Women With PCOS? Progesterone is produced by the ovaries when ovulation (release of egg) occurs. Smaller amounts of progesterone are also produced by the adrenal glands. Progesterone and estrogen, the primary female hormone, have a delicate and complex relationship. But suffice to know that progesterone does the exact opposite of what estrogen does. Progesterone is vital for the woman to conceive as it prepares her body for pregnancy and also regulates her monthly period. In PCOS, the hormonal balance of the female body is lost. And since the ovaries do not release eggs or release them sporadically, the progesterone levels are low. This could be due to a number of reasons estrogen dominance Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Home / Fertility / Boosting Fertility We asked doctors whether the drug Metformin really helps women with PCOS conceive, reduce miscarriage risk and increase milk supply. Here's what they say. If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), you're not alone. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information , this hormonal disorder affects between 5 percent and 15 percent of women of reproductive age in this country. In polycystic ovary syndrome, cysts develop on the ovaries, and the body produces excess hormones called androgens, which cause an irregular menstrual cycle. As a result, ovulation can be unpredictable, and getting pregnant can be challenging. "Since puberty, I've averaged one menstrual cycle per year," says Carrie, a mother from the Midwest who has PCOS. "I always wondered if I could have children." Carrie tried getting pregnant for several months, but wasn't able to because she wasn't ovulating. After evaluating her bloodwork, her OB/GYN suggested she go on either Clomid or Metformin to help balance her hormones to promote ovulation. "Because I had a very slight imbalance in my hormones, my doctor suggested trying Metformin before going straight to Clomid. Since I heard horror stories about Clomid causing multiples, I was happy to try Metformin first," Carrie says. Metformin is a diabetes medication that is sometimes used to regulate hormones in women with PCOS by balancing their insulin level. This effect leads to more regular menstruation and ovulation cycles , according to WebMD . Carrie got pregnant the first month she took Metformin. But not all women with polycystic ovary syndrome have such good results. In fact, experts say more evidence is needed to prove that Metformin helps conception in PCOS patients . "When putting all the data tog Continue reading >>

Progesterone & Fertility | Progesterone & Getting Pregnant

Progesterone & Fertility | Progesterone & Getting Pregnant

To learn more about using progesterone for fertility visit the Fertility Progesterone Guide . 1. Q: How should you use progesterone if you are trying to conceive? A: The basic rule is to follow the instructions on the bottle. You want to mimic your natural cycle as much as possible. For most uses you would begin to use progesterone by using this calculation: Figure out the first day of your period. Subtract two weeks. That day would be the first day you start using the progesterone cream. The general suggested use for progesterone cream is 40mg of cream daily, applied in a split dose, 20mg in the morning and 20mg in the evening during the two weeks before your period. If actively trying to conceive, it is best to test for pregnancy before stopping progesterone cream a day or two before the expected period. Progesterone cream should be continued if pregnancy is confirmed while using it (with the guidance of your healthcare provider). Example: An average cycle length is 28 30 days. In this case you would begin using progesterone around day 14 of your cycle, counting the first day of your period as day 1. If your cycle is shorter or longer than the given example you would start two weeks before day one of when your period is due. If you have no period at all then you would choose a date and work from there. 2. Q: I have found out that my progesterone is low. What does this mean to my reproductive health? A: When saliva hormonal tests show low progesterone levels, that could indicate that you have not ovulated or that you are not producing the proper amount of progesterone after ovulation which is called luteal insufficiency. The correct amount of progesterone after ovulation is very important for maintaining a healthy pregnancy. In a study published in the Lancet, a group Continue reading >>

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