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Metformin And Progesterone Cream

Progesterone And Fertility | Progesterone And Getting Pregnant

Progesterone And Fertility | Progesterone And Getting Pregnant

Hormonal Balance is an important factor when it comes to healthy fertility and getting pregnant. During the course of a menstrual cycle various hormones are working together in a complex symphony to trigger the components of ovulation and menstruation. Progesterone is one of these key hormones. After ovulation progesterone production is triggered by Luteinizing Hormone (LH) which stimulates the corpus luteum (the remnant egg sac) in the ovary to produce progesterone. One of the main actions of progesterone with fertility is to help support a developing embryo. If pregnancy occurs, the production of progesterone from the corpus luteum continues for about 7 weeks (it is then produced by the placenta for the duration of the pregnancy). If pregnancy did not occur, the period begins 14 days after ovulation. When fertilization does not occur the corpus luteum disintegrates, which causes the level of progesterone to fall and the endometrial tissue to break-down and shed as menstruation. Progesterone maintains the lining of the uterus which makes it possible for a fertilized egg to attach and survive Makes cervical mucous accessible by sperm Prevents immune rejection of the developing baby Allows for full development of the fetus through pregnancy Helps the body use fat for energy during pregnancy Capsules: 1,000mg a day is the suggested amount to use. Take vitex all month long. Tincture: 90 drops in water or juice, first thing in the morning. All month long. Unlike powerful hormone drugs, vitex works slowly to normalize the body. Maximum benefits are often achieved after 6-12 cycles with vitex. Natural progesterone cream can help to supplement your bodys own progesterone levels and lead you back to a state of natural balance. Natural progesterone cream comes from plant fats a Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Ttc With Pcos // Anyone Use Metformin Or Progesterone Cream?

Ttc With Pcos // Anyone Use Metformin Or Progesterone Cream?

TTC with PCOS // Anyone use Metformin or Progesterone Cream? Hi, ladies! First off, I LOVE this forum and it is so great to see how supportive everyone is. To give you a little background, I was diagnosed at PCOS at 18 and tried to treat it naturally (off the pill) until right before my hubby and I got married. We decided to go back on the pill before we got married. We've been married three years now and have decided to start trying for a family. I've been off the pill since the end of March. I had my normal withdrawal bleed starting on April 4th. Since then, it has been 73 days and I haven't ovulated or had a period. I've taken three pregnancy tests and all have been negative. I know that I can't keep going without a withdrawal bleed, but I have a couple questions for you ladies. Have any of you with PCOS used metformin? If so, was it helpful to you? My glucose blood results have always come out normal and I really, really try to eat healthy (I'm only a smidge over-weight), so I'm unsure if metformin will be helpful to me. Have any of you with PCOS tried using natural progesterone cream? If so, has it been helpful in regulating your cycles? I'm going to see my nurse-midwife on Tuesday and will ask here these questions as well, but I'm curious about your experiences. Thank you in advance for all the replies! i have pcos since i was 17, mc once, and then tried to concieve since as long as i can remember (about 10 years i would say). finally last year i got pregnant! i did not take metformin, i was on a low carb (mild) diet and had lot of stress free time (i quit my job) and spent lot of time out in the fresh air, cycling. i do not know if that improved my situation, but i ovulated (for the first time in about 1 year) and i got pregnant and it managed to stick! i did ta Continue reading >>

Progesterone & Fertility | Progesterone & Getting Pregnant

Progesterone & Fertility | Progesterone & Getting Pregnant

To learn more about using progesterone for fertility visit the Fertility Progesterone Guide . 1. Q: How should you use progesterone if you are trying to conceive? A: The basic rule is to follow the instructions on the bottle. You want to mimic your natural cycle as much as possible. For most uses you would begin to use progesterone by using this calculation: Figure out the first day of your period. Subtract two weeks. That day would be the first day you start using the progesterone cream. The general suggested use for progesterone cream is 40mg of cream daily, applied in a split dose, 20mg in the morning and 20mg in the evening during the two weeks before your period. If actively trying to conceive, it is best to test for pregnancy before stopping progesterone cream a day or two before the expected period. Progesterone cream should be continued if pregnancy is confirmed while using it (with the guidance of your healthcare provider). Example: An average cycle length is 28 30 days. In this case you would begin using progesterone around day 14 of your cycle, counting the first day of your period as day 1. If your cycle is shorter or longer than the given example you would start two weeks before day one of when your period is due. If you have no period at all then you would choose a date and work from there. 2. Q: I have found out that my progesterone is low. What does this mean to my reproductive health? A: When saliva hormonal tests show low progesterone levels, that could indicate that you have not ovulated or that you are not producing the proper amount of progesterone after ovulation which is called luteal insufficiency. The correct amount of progesterone after ovulation is very important for maintaining a healthy pregnancy. In a study published in the Lancet, a group Continue reading >>

Natural Progesterone Cream For Pcos: The Missing Piece?

Natural Progesterone Cream For Pcos: The Missing Piece?

Natural Progesterone Cream for PCOS: The Missing Piece? If you have been on any PCOS forum or Facebook page, youre sure to come across a discussion on natural progesterone cream and PCOS. This is something that Ive come across myself but never used. Well, I thought it might be time to have a closer look at why progesterone cream might be useful for PCOS and if it is, how we should be using it. Before we get in to the nuts of bolts of Natural Progesterone cream for PCOS, we need to understand what progesterone is and why it is important for our bodies. Progesterone is a hormone that is naturally produced by our bodies (or should be). Progesterone levels rise and fall throughout our cycle, and is normally at its peak after ovulation. You see, once you have ovulated and the egg has been released, what is left of the follicle become a progesterone factory and raises progesterone levels to 200 to 300 times of that of estrogen ( 1 ). The problem comes in when we dont ovulate. That surge in progesterone causes the lining of the uterus to thicken in preparation for pregnancy and also tells the brain to stop producing hormones to stimulate your ovaries to produce follicles. So, if that surge of progesterone never happens, the ovaries are constantly stimulated to produce follicles which can lead to the development of multiple cysts forming. As a result of this low progesterone level, many women with PCOS are thought to be estrogen dominant. According to Dr John Lee, some symptoms of estrogen dominance include ( 2 ): Doesnt sound good, does it!? Dr Lee recommends natural progesterone cream to counter balance the effects of estrogen in our bodies and it has been used successfully with many women with PCOS, it seems. ( 3 ) Okay so now lets have a look at how to use Natural Progeste Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Treatment On Luteal Phase Progesterone Concentration In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effects Of Metformin Treatment On Luteal Phase Progesterone Concentration In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Braz J Med Biol Res, November 2004, Volume 37(11) 1637-1644 Effects of metformin treatment on luteal phase progesterone concentration in polycystic ovary syndrome K.J. Meenakumari2, S. Agarwal1, A. Krishna2 and L.K. Pandey1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Medical Sciences, and 2Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India The causes of luteal phase progesterone deficiency in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are not known. To determine the possible involvement of hyperinsulinemia in luteal phase progesterone deficiency in women with PCOS, we examined the relationship between progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and insulin during the luteal phase and studied the effect of metformin on luteal progesterone levels in PCOS. Patients with PCOS (19 women aged 18-35 years) were treated with metformin (500 mg three times daily) for 4 weeks prior to the test cycle and throughout the study period, and submitted to ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate. Blood samples were collected from control (N = 5, same age range as PCOS women) and PCOS women during the late follicular (one sample) and luteal (3 samples) phases and LH, insulin and progesterone concentrations were determined. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Duncan's test and Karl Pearson's coefficient of correlation (r). The endocrine study showed low progesterone level (4.9 ng/ml) during luteal phase in the PCOS women as compared with control (21.6 ng/ml). A significant negative correlation was observed between insulin and progesterone (r = -0.60; P < 0.01) and between progesterone and LH (r = -0.56; P < 0.05) concentrations, and a positive correlation (r = 0.83; P < 0.001) was observed between LH and insulin. The study further demonstrated a sig Continue reading >>

The Misdiagnosed Miscarriage View Topic - Progesterone Cream And Metformin?

The Misdiagnosed Miscarriage View Topic - Progesterone Cream And Metformin?

by Sonoma Mama Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:50 pm Hello, I had a m/c in October at 11 weeks and have been TTC ever since with no luck. After a year of TTC with my son I went on Metformin and conceived on my very next cycle. When my son was 10 months old we TTC again and got pregnant right away using nothing except OPK. I thought it would be easy with the third since my second was so easy, but not true. After 18 months of trying I finally got BFP but then miscarried somewhere around 7 weeks and had a D&C at 11 weeks. I just started Metformin again a few weeks ago. I also started Progesterone cream as per my NP's suggestion. I started the cream 3 days after my pos OPK. Has anyone used the cream?? I am 14 days past pos OPK today and have tender breasts. I've heard that progesterone cream can cause pregnancy symptoms. Anyone have that?? If you used the cream , when did you stop? I am assuming that I should just keep taking it until I either get AF or a BFP. If you used the cream, did you continue using it for the first trimester?? by Sonoma Mama Wed Jun 10, 2009 11:03 pm I was actually told to use it days 14-24. But I thought "what if I ovulate later, then it would stop ovulation". So I waited until 3 days after pos OPK. I know from my history that I didn't have BFP until 16 DPO with my son and 21 DPO with my daughter ( and I knew the exact ovulation day!). Anyway...... after writing today I did a HPT and when I saw the line lighter than the control I said, "Oh well, another negative." and threw it in the garbage. I am so used to doing OPK's!!! I started to think, "wait a minute! maybe a faint line means something." Duh! So yes, it was a BFP today. So I am singing praises of Metformin that I started 4 weeks ago and progesterone cream. Anything can happen ladies, don't give up hope Continue reading >>

Pcos, Metformin & Progesterone Cream

Pcos, Metformin & Progesterone Cream

You may view most areas of the forum without registering. If you wish to post, you do need to register . It's FREE! I have recently been put on Progesterone cream & Metformin (500mg slow release) & would like to know if there is anyone else out there in a similar situation or if anyone's had success. Bit of background information...diagnosed with PCOS in 2008 after not having AF for 4mths, referred to Ob/Gyno. Went on Metformin (1500mg) & Clomid (50mg) conceived #1 first round (now 2). We started TTC#2 July last year. Conceived naturally 2nd mth, ended in miscarriage (7 wks). My Dr of 10 yrs left the area so I'm seeing someone new who is really into alternative therapy. She also doesn't want to refer me to the Ob/Gyno yet, I have to wait another 3mths :-( You are lucky that your doc would even consider alternatives I'm sure she is doing the best she can for you. My doctor straight out called me an idiot for just asking about progesterone cream After that I was too intimidated to even admit I was TTC. looking for a new doctor now...just taking a little while to build up the guts Another lady I know with pcos did manage to get pregnant twice using progesterone cream and metformin despite never having a period so hopefully it works for you. Best of luck. Continue reading >>

Pcos: Metformin And Progesterone

Pcos: Metformin And Progesterone

Just found out I have low progesterone and high insulin levels. My RE wants to start me on Metformin & Progesterone. Does anyone have any advice? Feedback? Have you ever taken Metformin? Does it help with fertility? Is there any hope?????? Good luck with metformin. It was so hard on my tummy. I would be at work and my tummy was rumbling and I would have to run to the bathroom. I've read about positive outcomes but I've never experienced any. My friend was on it for 6 months and got preggo naturally so there is hope Yeah, I can't take stand the side effects either. It's horrendous. All day long diarrhea and nausea. I even ended up paying extra to try the time release capsules and same effect whether I ate healthy or not. I ended up just not using it... I can't spend my life in the bathroom. I've been on metformin for years and don't have any problems. They did scale me up on it slowly increasing the dose every couple of weeks so that might help. I am on a high dose now and still don't have periods without help but I can ovulate with drugs. They say it helps so I go with that. What are you taking for ovulation? Clomid? I take metformin. I take 1000mgs a night. I started taking it when I was first trying to get pregnant. I wod take it then stop then take then stop. I wasn't on it faithfully. Fast forward 8 years later. My second ivf doctor prescribed it to me. I took faithfully and now have a beautiful 10mo old daughter. I also did other things such as acupuncture too. I was 41 at the time I started taking it faithfully. I believe it helped the quality of my eggs also. The side effects will lessen. You will learn what foods irritate you and what don't. You will also learn where all the bathrooms are when you first start taking them. Usually it is high sugar, like icing fo Continue reading >>

Progesterone, Fertility Treatment, And A Baby On The Way!

Progesterone, Fertility Treatment, And A Baby On The Way!

My name is Kimberly Im 22 and currently expecting baby #1. Here is my story on progesterone cream. When I was 18 a reflexologist discovered I had a cyst on my left ovary. She made this discovery due to the fact I had severe menstrual cramps. She told me to take progesterone oil or cream, so I did and it helped my cramps and made my periods regular. I ended up running out of the progesterone oil that she gave me, and did not use it for a very long time. On August 11, 2005 I married a wonderful man named, Neal. Right away we started trying to conceive. I thought I would have no problem with this since twins ran in my family, and I was more than likely the carrier of this gene. Unfortunately I didnt conceive for over a year, and in September 2006 I started using natural progesterone cream. I used progesterone cream for 3 months because I remembered what the reflexoligist told me that if I couldnt conceive, to use progesterone cream and I would be able to. Sure enough, I conceived in December 2006, only three months after initially supplementing progesterone, though I was unaware at the time of of my pregnancy. I found out late January that I was pregnant. Unfortunately by then I had stopped using progesterone cream, and I went on to miscarry February 2007 at 8 weeks gestation. My husband and I were devastated. Shortly after I was diagnosed as having hypothyroidism, and according to my GP it was apparently the reason I miscarried. So we chose fertility treatments. I used the fertility drug Clomid for three cycles all unsuccessful. Finally I switched doctors. This new doctor diagnosed me as having insulin resistance the metabolic syndrome associated with Poly Cystic Ovary Syndome (PCOS). I didnt actually actual PCOS, just the insulin resistance that most PCOS patients have. Continue reading >>

How To Increase Progesterone - Miscarriage Research

How To Increase Progesterone - Miscarriage Research

These methods have been shown effective for increasing progesterone levels: 750 mg vitamin C per day (increased progesterone 77% and improved fertility) 600 mg vitamin E (increased progesterone in 67% of patients) 6 g L-arginine (increased progesterone in 71% of patients) Increasing beta carotene (boosts progesterone levels in dogs and goats) Supplementing with Vitex Agnus Castus (increases progesterone and fertility) 120 mg Black Cohosh on days 1 to 12 (increases progesterone and fertility) Improving insulin sensitivity (metformin increases progesterone levels 246%) Replacing saturated fat in the diet with unsaturated fat 80mg progesterone cream (shown to be as effective as 200 mg oral progesterone prescription) Eating a high protein, low carbohydrate diet Lowering TSH levels in subclinical hypothyroidism 750 mg Vitamin C increases progesterone levels by 77%, improves fertility The concentration of ascorbic acid is reported to be much higher in human follicular fluid than in blood serum. This suggests that vitamin C may play a role as an antioxidant vitamin during folliculogenesis . After one cycle of Vitamin C (750 mg/day until positive pregnancy test) treatment, serum progesterone levels were significantly elevated in the treatment group but not in the control group (From 7.51 to 13.27 ng/mL in the treatment group vs. 7.95 to 8.73 ng/mL in controls). Nineteen patients (25%) in the vitamin C supplementation group and 5 patients (11%) in the control group became clinically pregnant. All pregnancies occurred in patients in whom the luteal phase defect resolved, whether spontaneously or as a result of vitamin C supplementation. We found that vitamin C supplementation caused improvement in 53% of luteal phase defect cases, whereas 22% of patients with luteal phase defect

The Most Misdiagnosed And Mistreated Hormonal Problem In Women

The Most Misdiagnosed And Mistreated Hormonal Problem In Women

The Most Misdiagnosed and Mistreated Hormonal Problem in Women Age Management , belly fat , Dr. Carragher , Dr. Mike's Tips , Estrogen , fatigue , Hormone Optimization , loss of energy , low energy , PCOS , Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome , Progesterone , Sex , Testosterone , The Body Well , Thyroid , Uncategorized , Visceral Fat , weight gain Leave a Comment Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS): All Too Often Misunderstood & Mistreated If you have weight loss resistance, menstrual irregularities, excessive unwanted hair growth, loss of hair on head, and/or acnekeep readingthere is a good possibility you have PCOS. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine (hormonal) disorder resulting in multiple medical problems and serious health risks. It affects millions of woman, many without their knowledge. It is estimated that between 5-10% of women have PCOS and that 70% of these women are undiagnosed. In fact, PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in premenopausal women. And for postmenopausal women, menopause neither cures nor eliminates PCOS. In fact,PCOS usually worsens at menopause due to weight gain and loss of hormones. PCOS seems to have a strong genetic component, so if a woman in your family has menstrual irregularities, diabetes, or a diagnosis of PCOS, there is a chance you may have it. It can be passed down from either your mothers or fathers side of the family. Unfortunately, one of the biggest problems with PCOS is that most physicians either miss the diagnosis altogether, mistreat it, or only partially treat it. Why is PCOS So Confusing to So Many Physicians? Because of its name, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, most physicians think PCOS is a gynecological disorder. Not true. Yes, it usually has gynecological effects, but its primarily a metabolic d Continue reading >>

Pcos And Low Progesterone Levels

Pcos And Low Progesterone Levels

I'm 28 years old and my husband and I have been trying to concieve unsuccessfully for the past 4 years. During that time I have seen a specialist only 4 times (that's the NHS for you!) I don't feel like I have received any proper care and no-one seems interested in finding out exactly what's wrong and giving an individual treatment plan. I do know I have PCOS, with very irregular cycles and constant low levels of progesterone that won't allow me to ever ovulate on my own. Now after 4 years I am waiting to undergo a laparoscopy - it took 4 years for the NHS to decide to check me over properly! So my questions: Can I take progesterone supplements that guarantee to increase my progesterone levels to normal? Will this kick start my body into ovulating itself? What haven't the doctors done this if it does work? My levels are 4 constantly - does this play any part in my severly and constant tiredness? Will my tiredness improve once my progrestone levels increase? What happens if they find my tubes are blocked - can tubes be unblocked? if not why? Why isn't there a magic treatment made just for me - why don't the doctors give me a medical MOT and set out a treatment plan for me? Continue reading >>

Fertility Drugs- Progesterone, Metformin

Fertility Drugs- Progesterone, Metformin

Progesterone is initially produced by the corpus luteum which is the leftover follicular structures on the ovary after ovulation. After implantation of the embryo it is produced by the placenta. Progesterone is essential for proper development and support of the endometrium which is the lining of the uterus. The endometrium must thicken and become more vascular to provide nourishment to the developing embryo/fetus. Insufficient progesterone, sometimes termed a luteal phase defect, is treated successfully with progesterone medication given by injection or other routes. Progesterone injections are commonly administered in IVF and donor egg cycles since the drugs used for treatment ( Lupron, Ganirelix, Cetrotide ) interfere with the bodys normal production of progesterone. Metformin belongs to a category of drugs known as insulin sensitizing agents used to treat type II diabetes. These patients have chronically elevated insulin levels (hyperinsulinemia) and metformin increases the pancreases sensitivity to insulin thus decreasing hyperinsulinemia and causing insulin levels to return to normal. PCOS is a common cause of female infertility and it is characterized by elevated androgens (male hormones), elevated insulin levels, increased body hair, irregular or no ovulation, ovaries covered with unruptured cysts and other symptoms. Once the abnormally high androgen levels in the PCOS patient are reversed, ovulation will often resume. Metformin accomplishes this by correcting hyperinsulinemia which ultimately leads to reduced androgen production by the ovaries. Metformins mode of action is different from drugs such as Clomid and FSH. Metformin corrects a physiologic abnormality allowing normal ovulation to resume whereas Clomid and FSH (albeit different mechanisms) effect the Continue reading >>

Metformin And Progesterone Cream

Metformin And Progesterone Cream

Wondering if anyone else out there is on Metformin and progesterone cream to try and regulate their period and become pregnant. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks :D I just joined this infertility support group and your post caught my eye. I've been on metformin and progesterone capsules for about 4 months now. I still haven't had a period and haven't noticed any changes, except that I've been getting a lot more stomach aches than usual, and I get sharp stabbing pains in my lower right abdomen every once in a while. The pain is always on my right side and never on my left. My stomach also sometimes makes constant growling noises even after I've eaten. I'm not sure exactly what the progesterone is supposed to do, and I haven't noticed any side effects from the metformin. I'm wondering if the metformin and progesterone are even working for me. I don't seem to ever have any side effects from medications. I'm sorry to hear of your recent pain since starting the progesterone capsules. I'm on a natural cream (Emerita) and haven't encountered any side effects as of yet. Maybe the cream will help you. The metformin XR, I'm on a 1500 dose now. Was originally on a 1000 dose and after increasing it (doctor said to go up gradually), my period came naturally. Now, I also started the cream, so I'm very curious to find out if the combo work. My next period is to come on the 16th, if all goes well. My body is sooo weird, I could go 5-6 months without a period and often have to take provera to bring it on. Very rarely does it just come on by itself. How about you? I wish us both luck. It sounds like we're wanting a baby equally bad. Yeah... as I mentioned in my other post, my body has never ever started a period on its own! I either have to be on birth control or provera (but birt Continue reading >>

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