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Metformin And Periods Side Effects

One For The Women On Here

One For The Women On Here

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am on 4 x 500 Metformin a day and am also on the contraceptive injection. I've been on the injection for years and have never had a period. I've been on the Metformin for about 2 months now and all of a sudden I'm bleeding and have been for over a week and its showing no signs of stopping. Do any of you know if Metformin can have an affect on your periods as my diabetic nurse didnt know. I've looked online and seen that it used to be used for women with PCOS to regulate their periods so i'm wondering if this is why I'm having one and if my injection is actually covering me against pregnancy!! Isn't it great we can talk about anything on this forum? That's what makes it a winner Anyway..Hi Louise from a fellow depo user. Same situation for me, been on it close to twenty years with no periods. Was diagnosed last year, refused meds but decided to go on Metformin recently. I have had a lot of cramping and small amounts of spotting which seems a bit of a coincidence, it's interesting to hear that you are experiencing some strange effects. I have decided to stop the Depo, I'm now forty eight and due to the lack of periods, haven't got a clue what is going on with my body..would like to know for sure if I'm approaching/going through the menopause. I would definitely get this checked out though Louise..make an appt with your GP and let us know how you get on please. Thank you so much for replying. My diabetic nurse did make me laugh, she said that because I'm only 31 she doesnt normally deal with women of my age that are on both depo and metformin so obviously I must be a rarity!!! I'm hoping that it stops again soon because I also have the depo because my Continue reading >>

Effect Of Dosage Of Metformin On Menstruation And Lipid Profile In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effect Of Dosage Of Metformin On Menstruation And Lipid Profile In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effect of Dosage of Metformin on Menstruation and Lipid Profile in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01474967 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Hamidreza Mahboobi, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and causes menstrual disruption in 6.6-6.8% of women in reproductive age and is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism and anovulation. The gaol of this study was to assess the effects of metformin on menstrual disorders and lipid profile in women with PCOS in bandarabbas. Poly cystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder in women that affecting of 6.6-6.8% of women o f reproductive age. PCOS associated with a broad range of clinical, hormonal and metabolic disorders consist of hirsutism, Obesity, Acne and elevated male hormones, anovulatory cycles, dyslipidemia and infertility. Metformin is an oral hyperglycemic agent witch by decrease insulin resistance and improving serum glucose level in diabetic patients and anovulatory cyle in women with PCOS. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different dosage of metformin on menstruation and lipid profile in women with PCOS in banda-abbas. Effect of Dosage of Met Continue reading >>

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of body metabolism that affects 5-10% of women and can cause infrequent periods, weight gain, acne, unwanted hair growth and infertility. PCOS should not be confused with the incidental finding of polycystic ovaries on an ultrasound scan which occur in about 20% of the female population and usually do not cause any symptoms. The cause of PCOS is not fully understood but is thought to have a genetic component. The small cysts seen in the ovaries do not cause PCOS but are the result of the underlying disturbance of metabolism. Most women with PCOS do not have every symptom and the treatment that a doctor recommends is usually chosen to treat the symptoms that bother the woman. In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the use of Metformin to treat the symptoms of PCOS. This information sheet aims to answer many of the questions that women have about this treatment. What is Metformin? Metformin is a medicine that is taken by mouth. It is from a family of drugs known as biguanides and was developed to treat type 2 (late onset) diabetes. Why is it used to treat PCOS? There are a number of similarities between PCOS and adult-onset diabetes. In both conditions, people have a resistance to the effects of insulin with resulting high levels of insulin in their blood stream. These high insulin levels cause an increased production of androgens (male-type hormones that can cause acne and unwanted hair growth) in the ovaries and adrenal glands. This in turn affects the pituitary hormones (LH and FSH) that normally stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. The result is often irregular infertile periods. Metformin increases the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in a lowering of blood insulin levels which in turn lowers the androg Continue reading >>

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

I'm having a really worrying medical problem that I hope you can help me with. I was diagnosed with type two diabetes about a year and a half ago. When was first diagnosed I took insulin and my menstrual cycle was normal-for me anyway, 8 to 9 days and very painful cramping. I was able to skip my period with pills or the Nuvaring, my preferred birth control. Some info about me: Caucasian, 34 years old, 30 pounds overweight but losing weight due to Invokana, experiencing prolonged menstruation for more than eight weeks, live in the US, have type 2 diabetes, had one ovary removed at age 19. Unfortunately my blood sugar was still out of control with insulin and it made me gain weight, so I tried Metformin (for about 9 months) which I quit due to severe nausea and exhaustion. I'm now taking Invokana and having good numbers with my blood sugar. The menstrual bleeding is my only side effect. My problem is, with both of these pills, I had/have extremely long, heavy periods. I would have periods of 9 to 14 days on Metformin while using a new Nuvaring every 21 days. I've currently been bleeding on and off for over two months(!)--basically, since I started the Invokana. I've seen my gynecologist twice about this as well as my GP and they both agree that my reproductive health is fine, it's just a reaction to the medications. The gynecologist gave me a prescription for the generic version of Seasonique, since I was bleeding so much on the Nuvaring with either Metformin or Invokana. Unfortunately, the bleeding still hasn't stopped after 4 weeks on the pill. This is a problem for more than the obvious reasons--the annoyance of a ridiculously long period and cramps. When I was 19, I developed two non-cancerous tumors on my left ovary and it had to be removed. I'm supposed to take bir Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects of metformin on body mass index, menstrual cyclicity, and ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 75235, USA. Metformin has been used as a treatment in many studies of the infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We will review the literature on this topic as it specifically relates to changes in body mass index (BMI), improvement in menstrual cyclicity, and effects on ovulation and pregnancy rates. Review of studies addressing biochemical and clinical changes in women with PCOS on metformin. Changes in BMI, menstrual cyclicity, ovulation rate, and pregnancy rate. Metformin has been shown to produce small but significant reductions in BMI. Multiple observational studies have confirmed an improvement in menstrual cyclicity with metformin therapy. The studies addressing the concomitant use of metformin with clomiphene citrate initially predicted great success, but these have been followed by more modest results. There is little data in the literature concerning the use of metformin and hMGs. Some (but not all) women with PCOS have improvements in their menstrual cycles while on metformin. The data supporting the use of metformin in ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate and hMG remain to be confirmed by large, randomized, prospective studies. Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

I've been taking metformin for nearly three months to try to sort out very infrequent periods from PCOS, and have now hurtled to the other extreme and have been bleeding to one degree or another (but mostly mediumish spotting) for about 2/3 of the time. I am pretty certain I can discern a longish period, then a week off, then two weeks of this spotting. Obviously the thing to do is talk to my doctor about it, and I will, but would love some advance thoughts of what she might say. Has anyone experienced anything similar? Hi I've not had experience of this yet. I just got put on metformin a month ago, so far my first perido on it was the normal 5 week length I always get. That's got me worried now though. Have you found the metformin helped with other symptoms? I've been on metformin for ages for PCOS. I think I might have had similar issues at the start, but it did calm down. I found it pretty amazing tbh and I was able to regulate cycles enough to be able to pinpoint ovulation and concieve first time of trying (huge suprise when i was told that I'd probably not have kids ever!) I am a slim PCOS-er though- not sure if that makes a differece in how effective it is How are you finding the gastric side effects? I haven't even had the gastric side effects! I was perversely quite looking forward to them as a possible weightloss tactic. In that case I will ask about progesterone, but be prepared to wait a little longer to see if it calms down naturally if my doctor suggests it. pipistrello you do not want the gastric side effects. I've had them right from the first pill. They're horrendous. Agree with A. I was same. I recently reatarted after having dd and it was hellish. I have to build from 1/4 to 2 whole tabs over 6 months or it's like food poisoning nausea and stomach pai Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

Early Effects Of Metformin In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Early Effects Of Metformin In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Early Effects of Metformin in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Obstetrics and Gynecology (S.E.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: S. Eisenhardt, M.D., Womens University Hospital, Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vossstr. 9, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany. Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and Biostatistics (V.H.), University of Heidelberg, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Internal Medicine (A.H.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 91, Issue 3, 1 March 2006, Pages 946952, S. Eisenhardt, N. Schwarzmann, V. Henschel, A. Germeyer, M. von Wolff, A. Hamann, T. Strowitzki; Early Effects of Metformin in Women with Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects: Prolonged Use Lead To Severe Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects: Prolonged Use Lead To Severe Side Effects

Metformin is a frontline diabetic drug prescribed by doctors to improve insulin resistance in the body. It is one of the most popular medicine for type-2 diabetes patients worldwide. However, according to a new research study, prolonged use of metformin can be a cause of side effects such as depression, loss of appetite, reduced mental ability to think clearly, fatigue and breathlessness. A recent research study initiated by the Indian government suggested that prolonged use of metformin causes vitamin B12 deficiency that triggers microvascular and neuropathy complications in the body. Additionally, if the diabetic patient doesn’t have a nutritional diet and continue taking metformin drug for long duration, it may cause him/her severe side effects. Based on this research report, doctors claimed that in India the number of people getting diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is increasing at a rapid speed, and given the fact most indians are vegetarian, they are also diagnosed with vitamin b12 deficiency that worsens when they take metformin for long period of time and end up with serious side effects. “Prolonged intake of metformin affects body’s ability to absorb Vitamin B12 and that lead to its deficiency. If a diabetic person is vitamin b12 deficient for long period of time, it causes side effects such as tingling sensation on fingers, slowness, fatigue, muscle pain, mental disabilities and forgetfulness,” said Dr. Nilesh Rajput. People who are vitamin B12 deficient can take supplements to fulfill body’s daily requirement, however if you want to avoid taking supplements than you’ll have to rely on beef, chicken, egg, fish, red meat, green leafy vegetables and beans as they are rich source of Vitamin B12. In the year 2014, there were 66.9 million people diagnosed Continue reading >>

Glumetza Side Effects Center

Glumetza Side Effects Center

Glumetza (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Glumetza is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glumetza is available in generic form. Common side effects of Glumetza include: nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, gas, diarrhea, weakness, headache, muscle pain, or a metallic taste in the mouth. An empty Glumetza tablet shell may appear in your stool. This effect is harmless because your body has already absorbed the medication. Low blood sugar may occur if Glumetza is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Glumetza should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2000 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Glumetza with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Glumetza with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or vancomycin. During pregnancy, Glumetza should be used only when prescribed. Your doctor may di Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period.

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period.

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period. Ive been diagnosed with PCOS since I was 17 and was put onto Dianette which was ok till hit 20 and then pilled on 3 stone of weight. I then started taking Metformin which helped me lose 2 stone and get pregnant. This was back in 2006 and my son was born in 2007. I was told that after the pregnancy my PCOS systems would not return Unfortunately they have but are worse this time. I have been put back on Metformin and other than the regular side effect (stomach upset) everything was ok, till 2nd May when I came on my period and have not come off since. It is very painfull and there are lots of clots. I have been to the GP who has said that this is nothing to do with the Metformin Has anyone else has this side effect? Previously to taking the Metformin, my periods were very irregular. the heavy period sounds like PCOS thing. Some women with PCOS will have long an heavy periods. Have you seen a gyno yet for this? It has only happened the once but the GP has tried to give me FSH to stop the bleeding but I\'m worried as they can stop your periods all together. I've never heard of the excess bleeding being a side effect of the metroformin, but I have heard of it being a side effect of the PCOS and since your symptoms are stronger this could be what's going on. Good luck with getting the period to end. it't not a side effect of Metformin. Check with your doctor maybe you have something else going on or your body just has alot of "missed" periods to make up for. good luck The heavy AF use to happen to me after months of no-af. They lasted so long, I was put in the hospital and tested for everything... then told, as long as I don't feel dizzy, it's ok. Be careful with your iron (I use to inevitably become "temporarily anem Continue reading >>

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