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Metformin And Parkinson's

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

A recent study found that the use of metformin in people with diabetes increased their risk for developing dementia and Parkinson’s Disease. This may be surprising as not too long ago, we reported on a different study which found the opposite–that using metformin might lower the risk for dementia in older men. The study from Taiwanese researchers was presented on March 29, 2017 at The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases in Vienna Austria by Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan from the Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The researchers found that long-term use of metformin may raise the risk of neurodegenerative disease in those with type 2 diabetes. How Harmful Might Metformin Be to the Brain? As reported by Medscape Medical News, Yi-Chun Kuan and team conducted a cohort study to follow a total 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. They checked records for these patients from the National Health research database of Taiwan including 4,651 who had metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who didn’t take any metformin. Dr. Kuan told Medscape they adjusted for age, sex, and diabetes severity and that despite this, “the cumulative incidences of Parkinson’s and dementia were significantly higher for our metformin cohort” at 12 years. In fact, the risk for Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s dementia went up over 50 percent during a 12 year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. Researchers also found that “outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment.” Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan said, “We’d heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse,” and she added t Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Home / Specialties / Geriatric Medicine / Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease Study finds connection between duration of therapy in senior patients and development of neurodegenerative disease. In 2011, the Journal of Alzheimers Disease published the findings of a large Taiwanese study showing a protective effect against development of dementia in diabetes patients who were given oral antidiabetic agents. The cohort of over 100,000 subjects included patients over 50 with type 2 diabetes, who were free of dementia at initiation, and received either or both metformin and a sulfonylurea. The results suggested that while T2D carries a two-fold increase in the risk of dementia, use of metformin, sulfonylureas, or both can reduce the risk by up to 35% over eight years. Medscape recently reported that at AD/PD 2017 (the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases), a group of Taiwanese neurologists presented the results of their own study looking at possible risk increases for Alzheimers and Parkinsons in people with type 2 diabetes, citing uncertainty about the effects of metformin on the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Utilizing the National Health Insurance research database in Taiwan, 4,651 diabetes patients who had prescriptions for metformin were selected, along with an identically sized, matched control group of patients not taking metformin. Although the statistical methods were not made available at the time of this writing, the findings were rather striking. Patients were retrospectively followed over a 12-year period. With regards to Parkinsons disease, the event rate in metformin users was 6.85% (n=318) vs. non-users at 2.7 Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia And Parkinsons Disease

Metformin Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia and Parkinsons Disease I need your input. This report got me worried enough to make me stop taking my daily dose of 1000 mg. Glumetza, extended release metformin. here are the links I wouldnt take it too seriouslysounds like the methods of the study were questionable, and other evidence suggests metformin has several beneficial longterm effects. These results were only presented at a conference so far (and lots of questionable science gets into conferences), so Id wait to see if it actually survives peer review (and if so, what it really looks like then) before making treatment decisions based on it. I wouldnt worry too much about this studys findings. These paragraphs contain reasonable expert skepticism. When asked for comment, Larry Ereshefsky, PharmD, with Follow the Molecule consulting group, Los Angeles, California, told Medscape Medical News that he was very surprised and skeptical about the results. He noted that the poster didnt explain how the investigators controlled for the confounders and didnt mention anything about alternative treatments for T2DM or hemoglobin A1c levels between the groups, which would affect the analyses. Its interesting and I would like to know more but I dont believe the findings based on whats up there, said Dr Ereshefsky, who was formerly a psychiatry and pharmacology professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Cuts Parkinson's Risk By 28 Percent, Study Finds

Diabetes Drug Cuts Parkinson's Risk By 28 Percent, Study Finds

Diabetes drug cuts Parkinson's risk by 28 percent, study finds A class of drugs currently used to treat diabetes could lower the risk of developing Parkinson's, a new study reveals, offering hope of new prevention and treatment strategies for the disease. The type 2 diabetes drugs glitazones could reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease, say researchers. By analyzing more than 100 million drug prescriptions in Norway, researchers found that patients who used glitazones (GTZs) saw their risk of Parkinson's disease reduced by more than a quarter. GTZs - also known as thiazolidinediones - are approved in the United States for the treatment of type 2 diabetes . They work by increasing the body's sensitivity to insulin , which is the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. Study co-author Charalampos Tzoulis, from the University of Bergen in Norway, and colleagues recently reported their results in the journal Movement Disorders. Studies have investigated the use of GTZs for the prevention of Parkinson's disease, but they have produced conflicting results.A study published in the journalPLOS Medicine in 2015, for example, identified a lower incidence of Parkinson's in patients who used GTZs, while another found no link between GTZ use and Parkinson's risk. "Based on current evidence, it remains unclear whether GTZs have a neuroprotective effect in PD [Parkinson's disease]," note Tzoulis and colleagues. Aiming to gain abetter understanding of the link between GTZ use and Parkinson's risk, the researchers analyzed data from the Norwegian Prescription Database , which holds data on all medications dispensed in pharmacies across Norway, as well as information on the patients to whom these medications are prescribed. The researchers looked at the link between the use of GTZs, Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Linked To Dementia, Parkinson's In Patients With T2dm

Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson's Risk in Patients With Diabetes VIENNA, Austria — Long-term use of the diabetes medication metformin may increase the risk for neurodegenerative disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), new research suggests. In a cohort study that followed about 9300 patients with T2DM in Taiwan for up to 12 years, the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) or Alzheimer's dementia was more than double during a 12-year period for those who took metformin vs those who did not — even after adjusting for multiple confounders. In addition, outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment. The results were presented here at AD/PD 2017: The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases by Yi-Chun Kuan, MD, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Interestingly, recent research has suggested that use of metformin may protect against neurodegenerative diseases. When asked about that, Dr Kuan told Medscape Medical News that "some studies have actually found positive [outcomes] but some have been negative ." So the researchers wanted to look into this using their own data. "We'd heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse," she said, but stressed that large-scale, prospective studies in other countries are needed to clarify the results. The investigators note that past research has shown a link between T2DM and increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, but there's been "some question" about the association with specific diabetes medications. They examined records for patients with T2DM from the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, including 4651 who had metformin pre Continue reading >>

Metformin And Neurodegenerative Diseases

Metformin And Neurodegenerative Diseases

Its one of the most widely used prescription drugs in the world, hailed for its ability to lower blood glucose levels, impressive safety profile, and low cost. Metformin the first-line oral drug for Type 2 diabetes has been prescribed in Europe since the 1950s and the United States since 1995, and achieved much of its formidable reputation through the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), published in 1998. But a new study may have slightly dimmed possibly just for a moment metformins bright halo. The study not yet published, but presented last week at the 13th International Conference on Alzheimers and Parkinsons Diseases in Vienna looked at about 9,300 people with Type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. As noted in a Medscape article on the study , during the follow-up period, the risk of participants who took metformin developing Alzheimers or Parkinsons was more than twice as high as it was for those who didnt take the drug. This was true even after adjusting for certain characteristics like age and diabetes severity that might affect whether someone was taking metformin in the first place. The risk of developing Parkinsons disease, in particular, was 2.27 times as high in participants who took metformin as in those who didnt. The risk of dementia from all causes was 1.66 times as high, and the risk of Alzheimers in particular was 2.13 times as high. Overall, taking a higher dose of metformin and taking it for a longer duration were both associated with a higher risk of developing one of the measured conditions. For example, taking metformin for less than 180 days was associated with a 1.77-times-as-high risk of Parkinsons, while taking the drug for 400 days or longer was associated with a 4.49-times-as-high risk of Parkinsons. Similarly, taking metformin fo Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Exposure On Neurodegenerative Diseases In Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Effects Of Metformin Exposure On Neurodegenerative Diseases In Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2017 Oct 3;79(Pt B):77-83. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.06.002. Epub 2017 Jun 3. Effects of metformin exposure on neurodegenerative diseases in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan; Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Beitou Health Management Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan. Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: [email protected] Epidemiological evidence reveals that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), including dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD). The effects of metformin exposure on dementia and PD risk in patients with T2DM are unknown. We evaluated the effects of metformin exposure on the risk of dementia and PD in patients Continue reading >>

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks

Long-Term Metformin Use Can Increases Alzheimers And Parkinsons Risks Metformin is the mainstay of conventional treatment for type 2 diabetes. It is generally considered to be the safest antidiabetic drug around and because the patent on metformin for blood sugar control ran out years ago, Big Pharma is desperate to find new and lucrative uses for it. Metformin has already been suggested as a preventive therapy for cancer, as an anti-ageing drug and as a treatment for tuberculosis. Some studies have also shown that metformin may help prevent cognitive decline, causing it to be touted as a potential anti-dementia drug. So, the recent finding that long-term use of metformin could substantially increase the risks of both Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases must have caused some consternation in the drug industry. In a study yet to be published, researchers in Taiwan followed 9,300 type 2 diabetes patients for 12 years, making this the largest and longest study of its kind.1They saw rates of Parkinsons disease and Alzheimers disease increase with metformin daily dosage and length of use. And the link remained strong after adjusting for participants age, gender and diabetes severity. In fact, the risks of these deadly conditions more than doubled over the 12-year period in those who took metformin, compared to those who did not. As I mentioned, this finding is at odds with earlier, shorter studies that suggested metformin could have a protective effect against Alzheimers. Because of these conflicting findings, further research is needed to establish exactly how metformin affects the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in the long term. But the new study provides another good reason to be very wary of this wonder drug. Thats on top of metformins risks of congestive heart failu Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Does Not Help Beat Cognitive Impairment As Previously Thought

Metformin Use Does Not Help Beat Cognitive Impairment As Previously Thought

Metformin use does not help beat cognitive impairment as previously thought Metformin use does not help beat cognitive impairment as previously thought Omega-3 fatty acids shown to reverse islet autoimmunity in mice 05 April 2017 A new large-scale study has found that long-term metformin use does not help slow down cognitive decline in diseases of the aging brain. The findings are of importance because diabetes is a risk factor for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and metformin , the first-line drug treatment for type 2 diabetes , may affect an important aspect of cognitive impairment in older adults. Scientists knew that having decreased insulin sensitivity negatively impacts memory formation and prevents insulin from doing its job, including preventing the build-up of plaque in Alzheimer's disease. Some studies hinted that short-term use of metformin might actually protect from cognitive impairment as the treatment helps correct insulin issues and promotes the formation of new neurons. This new research, however, suggests that this protective effect from metformin may be true only for a limited period of time. After following a total of 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes for 12 years, Taiwanese researchers at Taipei Medical University found that long-term metformin increased the risk of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease . The study showed that the longer a patient used metformin, here for more than 300 days and at doses greater than 240g, the higher the odds of developing these diseases later in life. In fact, the risk for Parkinsons disease or Alzheimers dementia went up over 50 per cent during a 12-year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. The higher incidences of Parkinsons and Alzheimer's dementia were still signif Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Increase Dementia Risk?

Does Metformin Increase Dementia Risk?

Here is evidence that metformin, especially at high doses and for long periods, is associated with increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. Metformin and Neurodegenerative Disease: An Unknown Link? O Epidemiological studies link T2D with increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer Disease (AD) and Parkinson Disease (PD) O Research is conflicting about whether metformin contributes to the increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases in T2D . Some studies have linked metformin to decreased risk of dementia [1] . Others suggest increased risk of AD with long-term metformin [2] Taiwanese Study Evaluated Risk for Dementia, PD with Metformin[3] . Used insurance claims data from Taiwans National Health Insurance Research Database . Included patients 50 years, recently diagnosed with T2D O Minimized bias with propensity score matching; adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, diabetes complications, medications PD and Dementia Risk Increased with Metformin 0 Parkinson disease: Significantly increased risk with metformin vs without . Risk over twice as high (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.683.07, p<0.001) 0 All-cause dementia: Significantly increased risk with metformin . 66% increased risk (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.352.04, p<0.001) 0 Alzheimers disease: Significantly increased risk with metformin . Risk over twice as high (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.203.79, p<0.01) 0 Vascular dementia: Significantly increased risk with metformin . Risk over twice as high (HR 2.30, 95% CI 1.254.22, p<0.01) Longer Duration, Higher Dose Linked to Higher PD Risk 0 Longer Metformin Duration: Significantly increased risk for PD with metformin vs without . 180-299 days: 46% increased risk (HR 1.46, 95%CI 0.902.37, results NS) . 400 days: 4.5 times increased risk (HR 4.49, 95%CI 3.066.58, p<0.00 Continue reading >>

Metformin May Help In Parkinsons Disease

Metformin May Help In Parkinsons Disease

Metformin may help in Parkinsons disease Posted: 30 August 2017 | Dr Zara Kassam (European Pharmaceutical Review) | No comments yet Researchers have found that a diabetes drug may help in certain types of Parkinsons disease The neuroscientists at the University of Tbingen have identified a protein that plays an important role in the energy balance of cells. If the protein is missing, the energy balance is disturbed leading possibly to cell death and ultimately to the onset of the disease. Using cell cultures, the research team has now shown that the diabetes drug metformin acts on the energy budget, thereby protecting the cells. The study has been published in the current issue of the journal Brain. When studying cells from a patient suffering from Parkinsons disease we saw that they lack an important protein which regulates the energy production, explains Dr Julia Fitzgerald at the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research , and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Tbingen. As a result, the cells keep on producing energy in their mitochondria the cells powerhouses unchecked and less regulated. Energy production comes at the cost of the generation of free oxygen radicals. The radicals damage the cell and lead to ageing and, in the long term, sometimes to cell death. The diabetes drug acts like a brake in this process. It slows down the uncontrolled generation of energy, thereby protecting the cells from the negative effects, the researcher reports. The study provides another indication that diabetes drugs might have a positive influence on certain types of Parkinsons disease. Only recently, an Anglo-American research collaboration showed that another diabetes drug can reduce movement disorder symptoms in patients with Parkinsons disease, said Dr Fitzg Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce The Risk Of Parkinsons Disease In Diabetes

Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Metformin Can Substantially Reduce the Risk of Parkinsons Disease in Diabetes Reports new study in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders Amsterdam, April 16, 2012 - A major 12-year study based on a Taiwanese population cohort has demonstrated that not only does diabetes increase the risk of developing Parkinsons disease more than 2-fold, the use of sulfonylureas, commonly used as treatment for diabetes, increases the risk further by about 57%. This study also found that by including metformin in the therapy, no increased risk in developing Parkinsons disease was recorded. Metformin, found in the French lilac, Galega officinalis, was originally used in traditional European medicine, and introduced into France and Britain in the 1950s for the treatment of diabetes. It has a long and relatively safe record, is off patent and relatively inexpensive. Professor Mark Wahlqvist, lead author of the study commented, An exciting aspect of the finding is that metformin seems to be working to protect the brain against neurodegeneration which contributes to Parkinsonismin. This means it may also be considered a relevant therapy for the prevention of dementia as well. While much needs to be done to understand the mechanism behind metformins workings, a re-setting of the regulation of energy metabolism in cells, including the brain, probably takes place. A similar benefit would be expected from exercise and diet because that too is a way of establishing healthy energy regulation not only for the whole body, but for tissues and cells in the brain. It appears that metformin has opened new ways to look at major diseases of modern society and how we may reduce the growing burdens of such diseases. Unlike other trea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Connection, Metformin As A Treatment

Diabetes Connection, Metformin As A Treatment

Diabetes connection, Metformin as a treatment Metformin has been used "forever" in diabetics and has been studied in life extension experiments in animals. It is taken by mouth, reaches the brain in at least animals, is a small enough molecule that it has a good chance of entering the human brain (MW=129, well below the ~400 limit) There are 18 articles in pubmed related to PD and metformin. 11 of them are in the last 2 years, so there is a rapid increasing interest: Here is a summary of the above 18 articles: "Metformin is widely used to treat type II diabetes and other metabolic syndromes. In addition, it has been shown to increase neurogenesis, spatial memory formation and reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease....These findings suggest that metformin protects against haloperidol-induced catalepsy through inhibition of oxidative/nitrosative stress and has the potential for adjuvant action in the management of Parkinson's disease." "Metformin a well known antidiabetic drug has been recently investigated and proposed to promote neurogenesis and enhance the spatial memory formation.... long-term metformin treatment resulted in significant improvement of the locomotor and muscular activities in MPTP-treated mice than acute treatment. Metformin treatment significantly improved the antioxidant activity as compared to MPTP-treated group. ..TH-positive cells ... were found to be protected from degeneration in metformin-treated mice (47%, P<0.01). Interestingly, BDNF levels were found to be significantly elevated in metformin treatment group.... In conclusion, metformin possesses neuroprotective activity and provides preclinical support for therapeutic prospective of this compound in the treatment of PD." Continue reading >>

Metformin Might Cut Risk Of Alzheimers, Parkinsons

Metformin Might Cut Risk Of Alzheimers, Parkinsons

Metformin Might Cut Risk of Alzheimers, Parkinsons A large study finds those taking the drug for four years or more saw their risk of being diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease lowered by 76%. New research out of Tulane University seems to suggest that metformin could be a tool to help combat Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, and dementia. Researchers found that those taking metformin for two years or more enjoyed a substantial reduction in the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, according to PhD candidate Qian Shi. Based on these findings, its possible that prolonged use of metformin could potentially protect the neurons in the brain from degradation, said Shi, a research assistant at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, who was speaking at the 2016 ADA Scientific Sessions. In a series of studies, Shi and others examined data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to compare neurodegenerative disease rates among metformin users and those not taking metformin. In the final study , 6,046 patients receiving treatment were followed from diagnosis until death or the conclusion of the study. Overall, participants were studied for an average of 5.25 years. For those not taking metformin, the reported incidence of developing a neurodegenerative disease was 2.08 per 100 individuals. That rate plummeted for metformin users those on metformin for two to four years had a diagnosis rate of just 1.30 per 100, and those taking it for four years or more had a diagnosis rate of just .49 per 100. The precise reasons metformin could protect the brain remain unclear, but researchers do know the drug is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. While this sounds like great news, it may be too early to administer metformin to all older Ameri Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Could Help Those Living With Parkinson's Disease, Research Reveals

Diabetes Drug Could Help Those Living With Parkinson's Disease, Research Reveals

A drug commonly used to treat diabetes could help those living with Parkinson’s disease, research has revealed. By 2020 it is predicted that 162,000 individuals in the UK will be living with the condition. While existing drugs help to control its symptoms, there are currently none available which slow or halt its progression. But now scientists say they have found that a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes appears to improve movement-related issues. The benefit persisted even when the drug had not been taken for 12 weeks, suggesting it might be helping to slow the progression of the disease. “It is not ready for us to say ‘well, everyone needs to start this drug’,” said Thomas Foltynie, professor of neurology at University College London and co-author of the study. “[But] if we can replicate these findings in a multicentre trial, especially with longer follow-up, then this can change the face of our approach to treating Parkinson’s.” Writing in the Lancet, Foltynie and colleagues in the UK and US describe how they tested the impact of the drug, known as exenatide. With recent studies suggesting problems with insulin signalling in the brain could be linked to neurodegenerative disorders, hopes have been raised that diabetes drugs could also be used to tackle Parkinson’s, with previous research – including in cell cultures and animals, as well as a recent pilot study on humans by Foltynie and colleagues – backing up the notion.. But the latest study is the first robust clinical trial of the drug, randomly allocating 60 people with Parkinson’s to one of two treatments – either receiving injections of exenatide or a placebo once a week. At the start of the study and then every 12 weeks, participants in both groups were assessed on a disease Continue reading >>

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