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Metformin And Pain

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Go to: Case Report Nineteen year-old-man, known case of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus for 4 y on 1 g metformin twice daily since diagnosis of his diabetes. He was in his usual state of health till he presented to the emergency department reporting nausea, vomiting and epigastric pain for 3 d. On physical examination, his height was 170 cm and body weight 99 kg; body mass index (BMI) 34.3 kg/m2, looked mildly dehydrated. Vitals signs were stable. Systemic examination was unremarkable, apart from mild epigastric tenderness. Laboratory investigations showed HbA1c 7.7%, Creatinine 58 µmol/L, Amylase 462 units/l (normal range < 100), Lipase 1378 units/l (0–60), white blood cells 16.8/mm3 (4–11) 80% of which was neutrophils, CRP 258 mg/l (0–5), Mg 0.76 mmol/l (0.7–1.05), Ca 2.17 mmol/l (2.2–2.6), AST 18 units/l (< 39), ALT 34 units/l (< 41), TG 0.95 mmol/l (< 2.3), Lactate 1.4 mmol/l (0.5–1.6). Abdominal Ultrasound and ERCP were done for the patient, results showed no gallstones and clear biliary tract, respectively. CT confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, with no identifiable cause. The patient was admitted to ICU for close monitoring and further investigation. Normalization of Amylase and Lipase was reached after Metformin cessation, and Supportive treatment in the form of IV insulin and IV fluids. Other potential causes of pancreatitis were excluded. Patient was discharged home in stable condition after 2 weeks. Few days later, after re-exposure to Metformin, he presented with recurrence of his previous symptoms, and elevation of Amylase and Lipase was documented. As a result, Metformin was suspended with improvement of his symptoms and biochemical profile. Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin For Nerve Pain | Pain Management Specialist In San Diego & La Jolla

Metformin For Nerve Pain | Pain Management Specialist In San Diego & La Jolla

Pain Management Specialist in San Diego & La Jolla addiction Aging Alzheimer's Anti-inflammatory Anxiety Arthritis Back Pain Baclofen Bipolar Disorder Cancer Cannabis Case Report CBD CDC Chronic Fatigue Chronic Pain Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - RSD Congress Controversy CRPS DEA Death Depression Drug Prices Fatigue FDA Fibromyalgia Glia Healthcare Costs Health Insurance Heroin Hyperalgesia Immune System Inflammation Insurance intractable pain Ketamine LDN Low Dose Naltrexone Marijuana Memory Loss Metformin Mortality MS Multiple Sclerosis Naltrexone Neuro-inflammation Neuroinflammation Neuropathic Pain Neuropathy Neuroprotective NIH NIH research Opioid Induced Hyperalgesia Opioids Oxytocin Pain Palmitoylethanolamide Paradoxical Pain Parkinson's Disease PEA PeaPure Poetry Politics of Pain Psychology PTSD Research RSD Sciatica Spinal Cord Stimulators Suicide treatment resistant depression vitamin D Vulvodynia Nancy L. Sajben MD and painsandiego.com, 2009. ~~~~~The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.~~~~~Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Nancy L. Sajben MD and painsandiego.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Is metformin the new wonder pill or snake oil? Based on one mans response to metformin and recent exciting research on the drug, I am looking forward to finding out how it works clinically for my patients with intractable pain (and possibly treatment resistant depression). Ho Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About: Metformin

What You Should Know About: Metformin

If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or you're prediabetic, there's a good chance you've been placed on at least one medication to control your blood glucose levels. Glucose is a sugar that provides energy to the body's cells. Physicians have several diabetes medications at their disposal (see chart). Some drugs help stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the blood and into cells, where it's needed for energy. These include meglitinides and sulfonylureas, some of the oldest diabetes drugs. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Editor's Memo: 2016 Practical Clinical Advances: Ketamine And Metformin

Editor's Memo: 2016 Practical Clinical Advances: Ketamine And Metformin

Last December, I wrote about 2 scientific clinical advances relevant to pain management: the recognition that circulating catecholamines control descending pain, and centralization of pain and neuroinflammation as the fundamental causes of persistent or intractable pain. This years Practical Clinical Advances of 2016 recognition goes to the use of oral ketamine and metformin in chronic pain. My criterion in citing these 2 clinical advances is quite simple: Is it a practical development that can be immediately put to work in the average pain practice? The recognition that oral ketamine and metformin reduce chronic pain is timely, as both of these agents are nonopioids that will help the country continue its efforts to find opioid alternatives in the management of chronic pain. Ketamine and metformin are hardly new drugs, but some innovative investigators have determined how and why they belong in practical pain management.1,2 While ketamine infusions have increasingly found merit and acceptance in management of severe chronic pain, there has been interest in whether it could be used orally in pain patients.3 Ketamine (Ketalar, generic), a derivative of phencyclidine hydrochloride (PCP), has an extremely varied set of pharmacologic actions depending on the dosage that is used. It has been in clinical use since 1963 and was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. Although less popular as an anesthetic and sedative, ketamine has gained popularity when used perioperatively for pain management among patients with opioid tolerance, hyperalgesia, and chronic neuropathic pain.4 According to PPM Board Member John Claude Krusz, MD, PhD, When it is administered as prescribed, ketamine is an exceedingly safe anesthetic agent for both human and veterinary use. Continue reading >>

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia 1Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Correspondence: Hussein Yassine, Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2250 Alcazar St, Los Angeles, CA 90030, USA, Phone +1 323 442 1909, Fax +1 323 442 2082, Email [email protected] Theodore Price, Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, 1501N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245050, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA, Tel +1 520 471 0360, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Taylor et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License The full terms of the License are available at . Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. This article has been corrected. See J Pain Res. 2014; 7: 89 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenos Continue reading >>

Muscle Pain And Metformin

Muscle Pain And Metformin

Thanks for your reply, Jangar. My husband did mention this to the GP at his annual review a couple of months ago. At that time he was also taking an additional medication (the name of which totally escapes me at the moment, sorry) and we thought it was that which was causing the problem as one of the side effects was muscle pains. So he stopped taking that (with the GP's permission) but the pain didn't go away. I would have thought there would be other symptoms as well if it was lactic acidosis? Unfortunately the diabetic team and GP at our surgery are not exactly brilliant. My husband has to tell THEM about diabetes! I will make sure he makes a point of mentioning this to the doctor and getting some kind of answer, but I know he won't go until his next appointment and there's no way I can make him. However, I will see if he'll ring the GP and speak to him, as they are quite happy to speak to you on the phone. Thanks again, and if and when I get any answers I'll let you know. Best wishes.<1268> Lancer, I see this is an old thread, but you posted today. Are you sure you're not on some statin tablet too, for cholesterol? Because certain statin tablets definitely cause muscle pains. It does not affect all people, but I have heard big complaints about muscle pain by people taking tablets like Simvastatin ... Sorry, I am not clued up on the names of these tablets. Most end in -statin, but not all of them. I've never had muscle pains that I can recall, taking Glucophage (which is Metformin by another name). Hi Avocet I was thinking Cholesterol medications might be doing this! I had terrible muscle pain with Crestor and was switched to Lipitor, The reason I am up at 300 am is the terrible muscle pain. Just doing a little browsing myself and apparently and found this can also c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Effects Of Turmeric Curcuminoids And Metformin Against Central Sensitivity To Pain In Mice - Sciencedirect

Effects Of Turmeric Curcuminoids And Metformin Against Central Sensitivity To Pain In Mice - Sciencedirect

Volume 7, Issue 2 , April 2017, Pages 145-151 Effects of turmeric curcuminoids and metformin against central sensitivity to pain in mice Author links open overlay panel SuruchiVermaa Open Access funded by Center for Food and Biomolecules, National Taiwan University The reported experimental study was conducted to compare the effects of repeated daily oral doses of curcuminoids (CLE) with metformin as potential antidepressants and analgesics. Effects of a single and ten daily oral doses of CLE (5, 20, 80mg/kg/day) and of 50mg/kg/day metformin (MET) were compared in mice hot plate test (HPT) for analgesics. On the 11th treatment day, all animals were subjected to foot shock stress triggered hyperthermia test, and on the 12th treatment day to tail suspension test (TST) for antidepressants. Immediately thereafter, their blood levels of glucose, insulin and cortisol were quantified. Dose dependent analgesic activity of CLE was observed in HPT, whereas the metformin dose tested suppressed only pain hypersensitivity in the test. But statistically significant effects of both of them were observed in TST, and both of them also afforded protections against body weight loss and slight elevation in core temperatures induced by daily handling and repeated testing. CLE or metformin had no significant effects in foot shock stress triggered transient hyperthermic responses or on blood glucose, insulin and cortisol levels. Reported results reveal that curcuminoids as well as metformin are stress response modifiers with antidepressants like activities, but only low dose curcuminoids possess centrally acting analgesics like activities. They suggest that the bio-assay system used in this study is well suited for identifying curcuminoids like plant metabolites with analgesic and anti-stres Continue reading >>

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

Joint Pain Warning With Some Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a class of widely prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes is tied to severe joint pain in some patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Friday. The drugs -- sitagliptin (Januvia), saxagliptin (Onglyza), linagliptin (Tradjenta) and alogliptin (Nesina) -- come from a newer class of medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. The drugs can be taken alone or used in conjunction with other diabetes drugs, such as metformin. DPP-4 inhibitors help fight type 2 diabetes by boosting the amount of insulin the body produces after each meal, when blood sugar levels are typically high. However, in a statement, the FDA said the medications "may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling," and the agency "has added a new Warning and Precaution about this risk to the labels of all medicines in this drug class." The FDA stressed that patients who take a DPP-4 inhibitor should not stop using the drug, "but should contact their health care professional right away if they experience severe and persistent joint pain." Doctors and other health-care workers should "consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe joint pain and discontinue the drug if appropriate," the agency said. Type 2 diabetes, which is often but not always linked to obesity, affects about 95 percent of people with diabetes. As the FDA noted, "when untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease." Continue reading >>

Metformin And Muscle Pain

Metformin And Muscle Pain

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I am type 2, diagnosed before Xmas. On metformin 2 x 500g a day. The tops of my legs, hips and bum area go from slight numbness to painful especially when I lie down at night. Its like pressure points. Has anyone else experienced this. Not sure if I should persevere or ditch the pills. Any replies appreciated Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member It sounds more like statin side effects. Are you on a statin by any chance? No, no statins. Doctor wasnt sure if I needed metformin or not as my levels not too high fbg 8.5 hbA1c 52 so might just stop taking them and see if symptoms ease. Thanks for reply Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member No, no statins. Doctor wasnt sure if I needed metformin or not as my levels not too high fbg 8.5 hbA1c 52 so might just stop taking them and see if symptoms ease. Thanks for reply Many on here have reduced their HbA1c on diet alone, have you changed your diet? My HbA1c was higher at 70 on diagnosis and I do take Metformin, but I believe that the low carb diet I eat has reduced it more than the tablets. Hi, I am type 2, diagnosed before Xmas. On metformin 2 x 500g a day. The tops of my legs, hips and bum area go from slight numbness to painful especially when I lie down at night. Its like pressure points. Has anyone else experienced this. Not sure if I should persevere or ditch the pills. Any replies appreciated Was initially started just on Gliclazide when diagnosed T2 March last year. During an appointment with an Endocrinology consultant I had Metformin added to my medication. I experienced aches and pains in all my leg muscles after a few weeks on Gliclazide and Metformin. Had the Metformin sto Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

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