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Metformin And Nerve Pain

Metformin Linked To B12 Deficiency

Metformin Linked To B12 Deficiency

Peripheral Neuropathy Patients Who Take Diabetes Drug May Have Vitamin B12 Deficiency June 8, 2009 -- The popular diabetes drug metformin may contribute to vitamin B12 deficiency , according to a new study. Researchers found that 40% of type 2 diabetes patients using metformin had vitamin B12 deficiency or were in the low-normal range for the essential vitamin. And 77% of metformin users with vitamin B12 deficiency also had peripheral neuropathy , a common form of nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes . Peripheral neuropathy is a type of nerve damage most often characterized by pain, tingling, and numbness in the hands and feet. Because peripheral neuropathy is such a major complication of diabetes , researchers say the results suggest that people using metformin be screened for vitamin B12 deficiency or supplemented with vitamin B12 . Also, anyone already diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy who uses metformin should be screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is primarily found in meat and dairy products. In the body, it plays a critical role in making red blood cells and keeping the nervous system functioning properly. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include anemia (low red blood cell count), depression , or dementia ; but often there are no symptoms if the vitamin levels are just a little low. B12 deficiency can lead to nerve symptoms similar to that of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, although the researchers note that they cannot be certain that B12 deficiency contributed to the peripheral neuropathy seen in their study. Vitamin B12 Screening Urged for Metformin Users The study, presented this week at the American Diabetes Associations 69th Annual Scientific Sessions, looked at the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in 76 people with type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetic Neuropathy?

Can Metformin Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetic Neuropathy?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS Metformin (Glucophage, Bristol-Myers Squibb) is a commonly utilized biguanide agent for the treatment of diabetes. Increasingly, it appears that metformin may paradoxically increase the risk of neuropathy in the patient with diabetes. Therefore, when you see a patient with diabetes who is taking metformin, greater surveillance may be necessary for the presence of sensory, autonomic and motor neuropathy. Wile and colleagues noted that metformin increases homocysteine levels as well as methylmalonic acid levels, both contributing factors to neuropathy.1 The study noted the increased frequency and severity of diabetic neuropathy in patients taking metformin, as well as reduced levels of B12. In a recent issue of Diabetes Care, Palomba and co-workers also affirmed that metformin raises serum homocysteine levels with resultant endothelial dysfuction.2 They suggested that folate supplementation may be helpful in reducing this effect. The suggestion that metformin may act to raise homocysteine levels is not new as others have suggested that more than six months of exposure to metformin results in rising homocysteine levels.3,4 Studies have previously suggested that elevated levels of homocysteine to be operative may play a role in the evolution of diabetic neuropathy.5 Metformin interferes with the absorption of vitamin Band, as a result, the chronic use of metformin may act to reduce vitamin B levels in the patient with diabetes. Vitamin B compounds are critical for normal nerve health and function. Accordingly, a reduction in the level of vitamin B may result in an increased incidence of neuropathy in those taking metformin.6 In addition, L-methyl folate (Metanx, Pamlab), the active form of folic acid, directly stimulates nitric oxide production, incr Continue reading >>

Metformin-induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Presenting As A Peripheral Neuropathy.

Metformin-induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Presenting As A Peripheral Neuropathy.

South Med J. 2010 Mar;103(3):265-7. doi: 10.1097/SMJ.0b013e3181ce0e4d. Metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as a peripheral neuropathy. Southside Endocrinology and Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, University of Alabama Medical School, Birmingham, AL 35205, USA. [email protected] Chronic metformin use results in vitamin B12 deficiency in 30% of patients. Exhaustion of vitamin B12 stores usually occurs after twelve to fifteen years of absolute vitamin B12 deficiency. Metformin has been available in the United States for approximately fifteen years. Vitamin B12 deficiency, which may present without anemia and as a peripheral neuropathy, is often misdiagnosed as diabetic neuropathy, although the clinical findings are usually different. Failure to diagnose the cause of the neuropathy will result in progression of central and/or peripheral neuronal damage which can be arrested but not reversed with vitamin B12 replacement. To my knowledge, this is the first report of metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency causing neuropathy. Continue reading >>

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The Use Of Metformin Is Associated With Decreased Lumbar Radiculopathy Pain

The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia 1Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Correspondence: Hussein Yassine, Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2250 Alcazar St, Los Angeles, CA 90030, USA, Phone +1 323 442 1909, Fax +1 323 442 2082, Email [email protected] Theodore Price, Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, 1501N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245050, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA, Tel +1 520 471 0360, Email ude.anozira.[email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Taylor et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License The full terms of the License are available at . Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. This article has been corrected. See J Pain Res. 2014; 7: 89 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenos Continue reading >>

Metformin Neuropathy Symptoms

Metformin Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Metformin/Biguanides ' started by Rosieroo , Dec 16, 2017 . I'm a LADA diabetic and up until a few months ago I was on 2000 mg metformin,insulin and linigliptin. At the same time I was having symptoms of neuropathy such as tingling in arms and feet and even shooting pains in toes. I had test done and my diabetic levels were 43 which I'm told this was normal and then had an mri and electrical tests with a neurologist an d everything came back normal no nerve damage. My gp suggested I was over medicated and took me off the met and linigliptin and I was insulin only. Well these symptoms started to go. However I have now struggled with getting my levels down and I don't want to take more insulin so I discussed with my specialist to try just 1000 mg of met with 10 units of novomix in the morning and evening. Well a few weeks down the line I am getting the tingling and pains again. I am wondering if it is the metformin. Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member I got pins and needles in my hand and memory problems with metformin. Metformin can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency which can result in neuropathy. I have now stopped taking metformin. I was given Metformin when the GP said that I have diabetes. I had no problems before I started but on Metformin I was feeling sick and my feet started feeling as if I was stepping on cotton wool. I was then put on the slow release Metformin 1500 to 2000mg a day and Gliclazide which I took before meals. A few days after I was getting pain in my ankles and feet. It felt as if there were worms going through my blood vessels or being cut with razors and it was extremely painful. This sensation s Continue reading >>

This Top Prescribed Diabetes Medication Could Be Causing Your Pain (and The One Supplement That Can Stop It)

This Top Prescribed Diabetes Medication Could Be Causing Your Pain (and The One Supplement That Can Stop It)

This Top Prescribed Diabetes Medication Could Be Causing Your Pain (and the One Supplement That Can Stop It) Oh, yes. It feels like theres lightning shooting through my hands and feet. Huh? Whats going on with your extremities? Eh, I am not really sure my doctor says its neuropathy. I think its just a part of having diabetes. This is a conversation I once had while doing a patient assessment. I will never forget how she described her pain. I could almost see little lightning bolts flashing through her fingers and toes as she described the ever-present buzzing and electric feelings in her extremities. At the time, I was working at an inpatient mental health unit, but since some anti-psychotic medications increase the risk of diabetes, many of the patients I saw were diabetic.1 It was all too common to hear them complain of numbness, shooting and stabbing pains, tingling in their hands and feet, loss of balance and reflexes, and even extreme skin sensitivity all symptoms of neuropathy. Some patients even had to rely on wheelchairs to get around during especially painful bouts. It was difficult to watch this seemingly matter-of-fact situation. But as it turns out, suffering from neuropathy may not be a consequence of just diabetes. This painful and debilitating condition maybe be due to a side effect of a diabetic medication vitamin B-12 deficiency. And not just any diabetic medication, the most prescribed diabetic medication: metformin. 2 In fact, a study found 40 percent of metformin users to be B-12 deficient. And of those metformin users, three-quarters experienced neuropathy .3 Plus, 22 percent of diabetics are already B-12 deficient, regardless of their medication regimes, making the metformin related B12 deficiency statistics even more significant.4 So that leaves Continue reading >>

Metformin For Nerve Pain | Pain Management Specialist In San Diego & La Jolla

Metformin For Nerve Pain | Pain Management Specialist In San Diego & La Jolla

Pain Management Specialist in San Diego & La Jolla addiction Aging Alzheimer's Anti-inflammatory Anxiety Arthritis Back Pain Baclofen Bipolar Disorder Cancer Cannabis Case Report CBD CDC Chronic Fatigue Chronic Pain Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - RSD Congress Controversy CRPS DEA Death Depression Drug Prices Fatigue FDA Fibromyalgia Glia Healthcare Costs Health Insurance Heroin Hyperalgesia Immune System Inflammation Insurance intractable pain Ketamine LDN Low Dose Naltrexone Marijuana Memory Loss Metformin Mortality MS Multiple Sclerosis Naltrexone Neuro-inflammation Neuroinflammation Neuropathic Pain Neuropathy Neuroprotective NIH NIH research Opioid Induced Hyperalgesia Opioids Oxytocin Pain Palmitoylethanolamide Paradoxical Pain Parkinson's Disease PEA PeaPure Poetry Politics of Pain Psychology PTSD Research RSD Sciatica Spinal Cord Stimulators Suicide treatment resistant depression vitamin D Vulvodynia Nancy L. Sajben MD and painsandiego.com, 2009. ~~~~~The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.~~~~~Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Nancy L. Sajben MD and painsandiego.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Is metformin the new wonder pill or snake oil? Based on one mans response to metformin and recent exciting research on the drug, I am looking forward to finding out how it works clinically for my patients with intractable pain (and possibly treatment resistant depression). Ho Continue reading >>

Metformin And Foot Pain

Metformin And Foot Pain

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Recently been diagnose as a T2 DN started me on 500 mg metformin then upped to 1000mg, since I have started the medication, I have been getting pain in the balls of my feet, I have searched everywhere cant find any link to foot pain with this medication, anyone else got the same issue. I am low carbing. Really trying with the BG levels I seem to have got some sort of control, started at 14 fasting but can't get them under about the 8 level in the morning and 10 after meals Foot pain can be Diabetes related or it could also be down to something like Gout. If you are concerned you should discuss it with your GP. Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea (usually transient), abdominal pain, taste disturbance, rarely lactic acidosis (withdraw treatment), decreased vitamin-B12 absorption, erythema, pruritus and urticaria; hepatitis also reported Here is a link to information about the Diabetic foot. There are other links as well to the complications: My suspicion is that you may have had the start of peripheral neuropathy, and now your BG is coming down the half-killed nerves are waking up and starting to transmit pain again, not uncommon and should wear off in time. 300 - 600mg Alpha Lipoic Acid and 500 - 1000 mg Evening Primrose Oil is one possible protocol for improving the nerve healing, along with keeping your BG below 8 or so. But I'd get a medical opinion in case it's something unrelated. Prolonged high BG can affect connective tissue and joints too. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems: The 411 On Neuropathy

Diabetes And Foot Problems: The 411 On Neuropathy

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Since January, we've been presenting a run-down of everything you need to know about living with diabetes complications. So far, we've covered your eyes , your heart and your kidneys . Because let's face it: knowledge is power. It's certainly our motto here at the 'Mine. April is National Foot Health Awareness Month (yes, they pretty much have a month for everything April is also National Pecan Month and Fresh Florida Tomato Month). Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common diabetes complications, affecting 60 to 70 percent of us PWDs. Of course, it's more likely to occur if your A1c (average blood glucose level) remains high over time, but simply having diabetes for decades can bring on diabetic neuropathy too. The highest rates of diabetic neuropathy occur in folks who've had diabetes for longer than 25 years. Amy's writing a series of tips about foot health over at DiabeticConnect this month. But remember that diabetic neuropathy doesn't just mean your feet. There are actually four different kinds: The most common is peripheral neuropathy, which causes pain, tingling, burning or numbness in the extremities, especially the feet, but also in the hands and harms. Autonomic neuropathy, which causes problems in digestion, bowel and bladder function, sexual response (for both men and women), and perspiration. It can also affect the heart and blood pressure, as well as nerves in the lungs and eyes. Autonomic neuropathy can also cause hypoglycemia unawareness , which possibly explains why people who have had diabetes for many years often stop feeling their lows. Proximal neuropathy, which means "origin," causes pain in t Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

How To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: peripheral, proximal, autonomic, and focal. Of these, the sensory neuropathies (peripheral and proximal neuropathies) are the most common, affecting our experience of temperature, touch, and pain. Autonomic neuropathy affects nerves involved in involuntary actions in the body such as emptying of the stomach, intestines, and bladder. Motor neuropathy affects the nerves in movement, a condition that is rare in diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy affects the feet and hands and is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. It usually is bilateral, that is, it affects both sides of the body, but it can affect only one side. Diabetic amyotrophy affects the nerves in the thighs and may affect both legs. Charcot joint may occur if the bones in the feet develop fractures and the foot becomes misaligned. Because of neuropathy, you may not feel the pain of the fracture. The foot can then lose muscle support and may eventually become deformed. Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments: Medications When you make a plan with your physician, you will most likely be in the "control pain" mode. Some people have described diabetic neuropathy of the lower extremities as pins and needles and numbness, which can change to the shooting pain of icicles through your feet or legs. As the condition worsens, you may lose your ability to feel pain even when the neurologist pricks you with a pin during his medical examination. As with many complications of diabetes, people with diabetic neuropathy symptoms of less than 6 months duration, which are associated with alterations in glycemic control, have a better prognosis when compared to people with chronic conditions lasting more than 6 months. When I was first diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, the first drug of cho Continue reading >>

Discovery Shows The Way To Reverse Diabetic Nerve Pain

Discovery Shows The Way To Reverse Diabetic Nerve Pain

New information on one of diabetes’ most debilitating complications…. Diabetic neuropathy affects approximately 60-70% of people with diabetes. For such a common problem that affects patients with diabetes, little is known about peripheral neuropathy. Patients with diabetes who are suffering from peripheral neuropathy talk of how terrible it is to live with the condition: how a gentle touch can be agonizing and how a warm shower can be torturous. But, at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, new research has shed some more light on peripheral neuropathy’s causes and may eventually suggest a way to reverse it. “Normally pain is useful information because it alerts us that there is a damaging effect – something happening to tissues. But this pain is typically without any obvious reason,” UVA researcher and anesthesiologist Dr. Slobodan M. Todorovic explains. “It’s because nerves are being affected by high levels of glucose in the blood. So nerves start working on their own and start sending pain signals to the brain. It can be a debilitating condition that severely affects quality of life.” Dr. Slobodan Todorovic and Dr. Vesna Jevtoviv-Todorovic, Harold Carron Professor of Anethesiology and Neuroscience at UVA, have demonstrated the reversal of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in mice through the use of a substance that is naturally present in both humans and animals. The researchers and their colleagues discovered that the high levels of blood sugar cause a change to the structure of channels that allow for the release of calcium into the nerve cells. This in effect forces them open and the overload of calcium into the cells causes them to become hyperactive. This high level of activity can lead to various effects, such as a slight tingling in th Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Neuropathy refers to any condition that damages nerve cells. These cells play a critical role in touch, sensation, and movement. Diabetic neuropathy refers to damage of nerves that’s caused by diabetes. Scientists believe that the high content of blood sugar in the blood of a person with diabetes damages nerves over time. There are several different types of neuropathies. They include: Peripheral: Pain and numbness in the extremities including arms, feet, legs, hands, and toes Proximal: Pain and numbness in the upper legs, specifically the buttocks, thighs, and hips Autonomic: Damage to nerves of the autonomic nervous system which control sexual response, sweating, urinary and digestive function Focal: Sudden loss of function in nerves causing pain and weakness of the muscles Neuropathy is one of the common effects of diabetes. It’s estimated that 60-70 percent of people with diabetes will develop some sort of neuropathy throughout their lives. By 2050, it’s estimated that over 48 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with diabetes. That means in the future, anywhere from 28-33 million Americans could be affected by diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage from diabetes cannot be reversed. This is because the body can’t naturally repair nerve tissues that have been damaged. However, researchers are investigating methods to treat nerve damage caused by diabetes. While you cannot reverse the damage from neuropathy, there are ways to help manage the condition, including: lowering your blood sugar treating nerve pain regularly checking your feet to make sure they are free of injury, wounds, or infection Controlling your blood glucose is important because it can help prevent additional damage to your nerves. You can better control your blood glucose through Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nerve Damage (neuropathy)

Diabetes And Nerve Damage (neuropathy)

Nerve damage is called neuropathy. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases states neuropathies are a group of nerve problems which often develop in people with diabetes over time. Nerve damage can be without symptoms or people can feel pain, numbness, or tingling in their feet, hands, arms, and legs and this damage can happen in any part of the body because it can affect any organ. Neuropathy is caused by high blood sugars making blood more acidic. As that acidic blood goes through small blood vessels, it can cause damage over time. About half of people with diabetes develop nerve damage. It can happen at any time but chances of developing nerve damage go up with age and the longer a person has diabetes. Neuropathy develops more in people who struggle to manage their blood sugars since elevated blood sugar is the root of the nerve damage. It is also more common however, in overweight people with higher levels of cholesterol and blood pressure. The National Institute of Health (NIH) also lists different causes or contributors to neuropathy: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use Peripheral Neuropathy This type of neuropathy is the most common type affecting people with diabetes and can be felt as pain, tingling, burning, prickling, numbness and complete loss of feeling in the extremities. This is nerve damage in the arms an Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pain? Study Says: Not Yet

Metformin For Pain? Study Says: Not Yet

Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drugs in the world. Its safety, effectiveness, and relatively low side effect profile have made it an international superstar and the gold standard for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although almost exclusively prescribed for treatment of diabetes, metformin has recently been the subject of clinical trials for treatment of breast cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and premature puberty. All of those conditions are related to the levels of insulin produced by the body. But could metformins star still be on the rise? If the drug can be clinically proven to treat pain, the answer would be a definitive yes. There is strong connection between diabetes and pain; patients with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, and the disease causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness, and swelling in fingers, shoulders, and feet. One pharmacological target for the treatment of chronic pain conditions is the kinase adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK). Metformin acts via AMPK, pointing to a possible clinical rationale for its use in pain patients. As yet, there is little clinical evidence that metformin can effectively treat pain, although a 2013 study in the Journal of Pain Research was among the first to find a correlation between metformin and pain relief. That study, which looked at lumbar spine pain, concluded that, Patients on metformin showed a non-statistically significant trend toward decreased pain on a variety of pain descriptors. Our proof-of-concept findings suggest that metformin use is associated with a decrease in lumbar radiculopathy pain, providing a rationale for larger retrospective trials in different pai Continue reading >>

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