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Metformin And Kidney Damage

Metabolic Effects Of Metformin In Patients With Acute Renal Failure

Metabolic Effects Of Metformin In Patients With Acute Renal Failure

Metformin use has been associated with significant disturbances in acid-base balance. Metformin remains the first-line therapy for majority of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Its metabolic effects have provided great support for its use in diabetes management. However, risks of renal impairment and lactic acidosis have always warranted close monitoring in patients with predisposing factors to these events. In fact, lactic acidosis has been associated with renal impairment. Metformin is not metabolized in the liver and is excreted by active tubular secretion. The risk of developing lactic acidosis greatly depends on the magnitude of each patient’s renal impairment and their age. Nonetheless, these studies fail to take into consideration those patients with renal failure. The majority of trials out there exclude patients with renal defects due to its nephrotoxic potential. The nephrotoxicity of increased levels of metformin relies on its effect on renal mitochondrial activity. Previous studies have demonstrated that therapeutic doses of metformin are not associated with risk of lactic acidosis. Renal mitochondrial dysfunction can lead to tubular cell ischemia and increased lactic acid production. Hence, those patients with renal impairment will warrant closer monitoring and dose optimization strategies to prevent these complications while obtaining optimal glucose control. Recently, renal dose adjustments changed. Now patients are to be monitored based on glomerular filtration rate and not serum creatinine for metformin therapy. A recent study conducted by David Cucchiari and colleagues evaluated the dose-related effects of metformin on acid-base balance in patients with diabetes who develop acute renal failure. In this cross-sectional study, 126 patients were i Continue reading >>

Renal Side Effects Of Metformin

Renal Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin, or Glucophage, is a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is available in both short and long-acting forms. RxList reports the most common side effects associated with metformin, occurring in more than 5 percent of patients using the drug, are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, diffuse lack of strength, headache, indigestion and abdominal discomfort. Metformin-induced renal side effects are rare but can be lethal. Video of the Day Metformin is excreted out of the body by the kidneys. When the kidneys are not functioning properly, metformin can accumulate in high concentrations which may result in lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a rare, serious metabolic abnormality that occurs with uncontrolled diabetes, severe hypotension as well as high metformin levels. According to Drugs.com, metformin-induced lactic acidosis is fatal in more than 50 percent of cases and usually occurs in diabetic patients with significant kidney dysfunction. Metformin should be used with great caution in patients with chronic renal disease and should be temporarily discontinued for surgery or procedures requiring radiocontrast agents. Symptoms of lactic acidosis are usually nonspecific but may include hypothermia, hypotension and a slow heart rhythm. Lactic acidosis always mandates immediate hospitalization with intensive supportive care and usually hemodialysis. Acute Renal Failure Acute renal failure is characterized by the kidneys' inability to filter toxins out of the blood as a result of injury to the kidney. There are numerous causes of acute renal failure but one of the more common is dehydration. Gastrointestinal side effects are common with metformin therapy and significant diarrhea or vomiting, particularly when there is underlying chronic renal dise Continue reading >>

Metformin In Chronic Kidney Disease: Time For A Rethink

Metformin In Chronic Kidney Disease: Time For A Rethink

Go to: The Case Against Metformin The main problem with metformin is its association with LA. Lactic acidosis is defined as an arterial lactate of > 5 mmol/L and a blood pH ≤ 7.35 (1,2). There are two forms of LA. Type A is anaerobic LA caused by lactate overproduction in order to regenerate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the absence of oxygen, and is usually seen in the presence of circulatory collapse, e.g. heart failure, sepsis, and shock. Type B, the aerobic version, is caused by underutilization of lactate due to impaired removal by oxidation or gluconeogenesis, and is the type seen in liver disease, diabetes, cancer, and alcohol and metformin intoxication. Combinations of Type A & B are possible. The therapeutic trough level for metformin is 0.7 (0.3-1.0) mg/L (3) (for μmol/L, multiply by 7.75). The pragmatic upper therapeutic limit is 5 mg/L (4). There is no doubt that metformin in toxic doses is a cause of LA. In rats, plasma lactate begins to rise if the metformin concentration is > 20 mg/L (5). Intentional metformin overdose usually leads to hyperlactemia (6), and often to LA. This can be fatal in cases with plasma metformin > 50 mg/L (7). Some cases are accompanied by a raised creatinine. Since the most common symptom of metformin intoxication is vomiting and diarrhea, it is possible that the reduced renal function is caused by prerenal dehydration and/or circulatory collapse. Metformin is renally excreted (8,9), with a clearance approximately linearly correlated to glomerular filtration rate (GFR). There are thus two situations where metformin intoxication can occur: failure to reduce the dose in the presence of CKD, and acute uremia. It is possible that a vicious cycle can develop with acute uremia causing metformin accumulation leading to vomiting, deh Continue reading >>

Risks Of Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes And Chronic Kidney Disease: Lessons Learned From Taiwanese Data

Risks Of Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes And Chronic Kidney Disease: Lessons Learned From Taiwanese Data

Abstract Like other biguanide agents, metformin is an anti-hyperglycemic agent with lower tendency towards hypoglycemia compared to other anti-diabetic drugs. Given its favorable effects on serum lipids, obese body habitus, cardiovascular disease, and mortality, metformin is recommended as the first-line pharmacologic agent for type 2 diabetes in the absence of contraindications. However, as metformin accumulation may lead to type B non-hypoxemic lactic acidosis, especially in the setting of kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and overdose, regulatory agencies such as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have maintained certain restrictions regarding its use in kidney dysfunction. Case series have demonstrated a high fatality rate with metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA), and the real-life incidence of MALA may be underestimated by observational studies and clinical trials that have excluded patients with moderate-to-advanced kidney dysfunction. A recent study of advanced diabetic kidney disease patients in Taiwan in Lancet Endocrinology and Diabetes has provided unique insight into the potential consequences of unrestricted metformin use, including a 35% higher adjusted mortality risk that was dose-dependent. This timely study, as well as historical data documenting the toxicities of other biguanides, phenformin and buformin, suggest that the recent relaxation of FDA recommendations to expand metformin use in patients with kidney dysfunction (i.e., those with estimated glomerular filtration rates ≥30 instead of our recommended ≥45 ml/min/1.73 m2) may be too liberal. In this article, we will review the history of metformin use; its pharmacology, mechanism of action, and potential toxicities; and policy-level changes in its use over time. Continue reading >>

Metformin In Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Are Current Guidelines Overly Restrictive?

Metformin In Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Are Current Guidelines Overly Restrictive?

Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently co-exist and the increasing burden of both conditions is a global concern. Metformin is established as the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes because it is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes and a reduced risk of hypoglycaemia compared with other treatment options. Patients with CKD may benefit in particular because they are at high risk of both cardiovascular disease and hypoglycaemic episodes. However, the use of metformin is restricted in this population due to the concerns over lactic acidosis. Recent reviews have evaluated this risk and concluded that current guidelines for prescribing metformin in CKD may be too restrictive. This narrative review considers this evidence further, but also examines the strength of evidence that favours the use of metformin in CKD patients. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free tions is a global concern. Metformin is established as the ing dialysis in the UK, with an incidence of 25.4%.2Overt diabetic The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that 387 References for this review were identified through searches of 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) in the intensive group and 7.9% (63 diabetes to undergo standard glucose control (mean HbA1c minuria. There was a significantly lower incidence of major the incidence of nephropathy. The use of most classes of oral risk of developing ESRD (65%), microalbuminuria (9%) and They state that its use is contraindicated with a creatinine >1.5 mg/dL (133 μmol/L) in men or >1.4 mg/dL (124 μmol/L) in the prevalence of people with an eGFR of <45 mL/min was the large burden of type 2 diabetes, these data suggest that randomisation op Continue reading >>

Using Metformin In The Presence Of Renal Disease

Using Metformin In The Presence Of Renal Disease

Using metformin in the presence of renal disease Using metformin in the presence of renal disease BMJ 2015; 350 doi: (Published 14 April 2015) Cite this as: BMJ 2015;350:h1758 Tahseen A Chowdhury, consultant in diabetes, M Magdi Yaqoob, professor in clinical nephrology 1Departments of Diabetes and Nephrology, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London E1 1BB, UK. Correspondence to: T Chowdhury Tahseen.Chowdhury{at}bartshealth.nhs.uk Current guidelines are too restrictive, and many patients who could benefit are missing out In January, the electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC) updated the Summary of Product Characteristics for Glucophage (metformin), approved by the UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). The summary states that Metformin may be used in patients with moderate renal impairment, stage 3a (creatinine clearance [CrCl] 45-59 mL/min or estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m2) only in the absence of other conditions that may increase the risk of lactic acidosis . . . If CrCl or eGFR fall <45 mL/min or <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 respectively, metformin must be discontinued immediately.1 This is reiterated in the patient information leaflet. Interestingly, the summary for generic metformin states that Renal failure or renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance <60 ml/min) is a contraindication to use. In the face of burgeoning levels of type 2 diabetes and associated renal disease, we believe that this restriction is too conservative and will deny an important drug to many thousands of people with diabetes who Continue reading >>

Metformin In People With Kidney Disease

Metformin In People With Kidney Disease

Just over one year ago here at Diabetes Flashpoints, we discussed the possibility that hundreds of thousands of people with both diabetes and kidney disease might benefit from taking the diabetes drug metformin. As we noted then, this drug has carried a “black box” warning on its label — mandated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) — ever since it became available in the United States in 1994, due to concerns about lactic acidosis. This rare but extremely serious reaction was found to be an unacceptably common side effect of a drug related to metformin — phenformin — which was pulled from the U.S. market in 1977. Lactic acidosis is much more common in people with impaired kidney function. Since metformin’s warning label is based, in part, on concerns about a different drug entirely, many researchers have tried to estimate how safe metformin is for people with diabetes whose kidney function is impaired. Last year, we noted that many researchers believe metformin is safe for people with mild to moderate kidney disease, defined as having an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30–60 ml/min. And one study found that using a safety cutoff of an eGFR of 30 ml/min, nearly one million people in the United States who currently don’t take metformin because of the FDA’s labeling might be able to safely do so. So what’s changed in the last year? The evidence, it seems, has only grown stronger in favor of metformin being more widely prescribed to people with kidney disease. As noted in a recent article at DiabetesInControl.com, the blood-glucose-lowering benefits of loosening restrictions on metformin could be enormous. One study cited in the article, published last August in the journal Diabetes Care, found that depending on how eGFR is ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although metformin, the popular type 2 diabetes medication, is usually not prescribed for people with kidney disease, a new analysis shows the drug may be safer for these patients than once thought. Metformin has been used in the United States for two decades to help lower blood sugar levels among people with type 2 diabetes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautions that people with kidney disease should not take the drug because it could increase their risk for a potentially serious condition called lactic acidosis. This is when lactic acid builds up in the bloodstream after oxygen levels in the body are depleted. After reviewing published research to evaluate the risks associated with metformin among people with mild to moderate kidney disease, a team of researchers led by Dr. Silvio Inzucchi, a professor of medicine at Yale University, found these patients were at no greater risk for lactic acidosis than people who were not taking the drug. "What we found is that there is essentially zero evidence that this is risky," Inzucchi, who is also medical director of the Yale Diabetes Center, said in a university news release. "The drug could be used safely, so long as kidney function is stable and not severely impaired," he said. Despite warnings, many doctors are already prescribing metformin to patients with kidney disease, the study published in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed. "Many in the field know that metformin can be used cautiously in patients who have mild to moderate kidney problems," Inzucchi said. "Most specialists do this all the time." Still, the researchers said their findings are significant because many doctors stop prescribing metformin once their patients g Continue reading >>

Why Is Metformin Contraindicated In Chronic Kidney Disease?

Why Is Metformin Contraindicated In Chronic Kidney Disease?

To the Editor: In their article about the care of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, Sakhuja et al1 mentioned that metformin is contraindicated in chronic kidney disease. Metformin is a good and useful drug. Not only is it one of the cheapest antidiabetic medications, it is the only one shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality rates in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although metformin is thought to increase the risk of lactic acidosis, a Cochrane review2 found that the incidence of lactic acidosis was only 4.3 cases per 100,000 patient-years in patients taking metformin, compared with 5.4 cases per 100,000 patient-years in patients not taking metformin. Furthermore, in a large registry of patients with type 2 diabetes and atherothrombosis,3 the rate of all-cause mortality was 24% lower in metformin users than in nonusers, and in those who had moderate renal impairment (creatinine clearance 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2) the difference was 36%.3 A trial by Rachmani et al4 raised questions about the standard contraindications to metformin. The authors reviewed 393 patients who had at least one contraindication to metformin but who were receiving it anyway. Their serum creatinine levels ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 mg/dL. There were no cases of lactic acidosis reported. The patients were then randomized either to continue taking metformin or to stop taking it. At 2 years, the group that had stopped taking it had gained more weight, and their glycemic control was worse. In the Cochrane analysis,2 although individual creatinine levels were not available, 53% of the studies reviewed did not exclude patients with serum creatinine levels higher than 1.5 mg/dL. This equated to 37,360 patient-years of metformin use in studies that included patients with chronic kidney disease, and did Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Kidney Problems?

Can Metformin Cause Kidney Problems?

Actually, metformin is usually not the original cause of kidney problems. However, metformin is eliminated by the kidneys and when a patient has poor kidney function, the metformin can build up in the blood and cause a rare but serious condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis affects the chemistry balance of your blood and can lead to kidney failure and other organ failure. The risk of lactic acidosis is very low and most often occurs in patients with poor kidney function - so for most patients, the benefits of metformin outweigh the risks of treatment. Most doctors will regularly perform kidney function tests to make sure the kidney is working well in patients who are taking metformin. With that said, if you are taking metformin, contact your doctor immediately if you experience unexplained weakness, muscle pain, difficulty breathing, or increased drowsiness - these can be early signs of lactic acidosis. Also, if you are taking metformin and going to receive a radiocontrast dye study or have surgery, tell your doctors that you are taking metformin - in most cases, your doctor will instruct you to temporarily stop taking metformin during these procedures to help decrease the risk of lactic acidosis. Continue Learning about Metformin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Clinical Research Extending Metformin Use In Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study In Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

Clinical Research Extending Metformin Use In Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study In Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

Metformin use in advanced chronic kidney disease is controversial. This study sought to examine the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of low-dose metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease. In this open-label, phase I trial, 3 consecutive cohorts (1, 2, and 3) of 6 patients each were recruited to receive 250-, 500-, or 1000-mg once-daily doses of metformin, respectively. All patients underwent a first-dose pharmacokinetic profile and weekly trough metformin concentrations for the duration of 4 weeks of daily therapy. Prespecified clinical and biochemical safety endpoints of serum bicarbonate, venous pH, and serum lactate were assessed weekly. Efficacy was assessed by pre- and post-HbA1c and 72-hour capillary glucose monitoring. There was no evidence of accumulation of metformin in any cohort. There were no episodes of hyperlactatemia or metabolic acidosis and no significant change in any biochemical safety measures. Median (interquartile range) observed trough concentrations of metformin in cohorts 1, 2, and 3 were 0.083 (0.121) mg/l, 0.239 (0.603) mg/l, and 1.930 (3.110) mg/l, respectively. Average capillary glucose concentrations and mean HbA1c decreased in all cohorts. In our patient cohorts with diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease, treatment with 4 weeks of low-dose metformin was not associated with adverse safety outcomes and revealed stable pharmacokinetics. Our study supports the liberalization of metformin use in this population and supports the use of metformin assays for more individualized dosing. Continue reading >>

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As you were browsing PracticeUpdate, something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this . After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to PracticeUpdate. ​ You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.226.183.143 on 2018-01-06 18:18:13 UTC. Trace: 8d3497e3-c874-476e-b444-70710053403c via f142fe30-0da7-428a-92b2-8a74e399b4ec Continue reading >>

Use Of Metformin In The Setting Of Mild-to-moderate Renal Insufficiency

Use Of Metformin In The Setting Of Mild-to-moderate Renal Insufficiency

ADVANTAGES OF METFORMIN There is some evidence that early treatment with metformin is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and total mortality in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (4). However, the data come from a small subgroup of a much larger trial. In contrast, despite multiple trials of intensive glucose control using a variety of glucose-lowering strategies, there is a paucity of data to support specific advantages with other agents on cardiovascular outcomes (5–7). In the original UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), 342 overweight patients with newly diagnosed diabetes were randomly assigned to metformin therapy (8). After a median period of 10 years, this subgroup experienced a 39% (P = 0.010) risk reduction for myocardial infarction and a 36% reduction for total mortality (P = 0.011) compared with conventional diet treatment. Similar benefits were not observed in those randomly assigned to sulfonylurea or insulin. In an 8.5-year posttrial monitoring study, after participants no longer were randomly assigned to their treatments, individuals originally assigned to metformin (n = 279) continued to demonstrate a reduced risk for both myocardial infarction (relative risk 33%, P = 0.005) and total mortality (relative risk 27%, P = 0.002) (9). The latter results are even more impressive when one considers that HbA1c levels in all initially randomly assigned groups had converged within 1 year of follow-up. Unlike sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and insulin, metformin is weight neutral (10), which makes it an attractive choice for obese patients. Furthermore, the management of type 2 diabetes can be complicated by hypoglycemia, which can seriously limit the pursuit of glycemic control. Here, too, metformin has advantages over insulin and some Continue reading >>

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