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Metformin And Keto Diet

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Virta is a science-based online specialty medical clinic using continuous remote monitoring and intensive coaching to help our patients reverse type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. A unique contributor to our success in this is harnessing and sustaining the metabolic benefits of nutritional ketosis. Admittedly, reversing diabetes is a rather bold goal. By way of contrast, the American Diabetes Association defines type 2 diabetes as a progressive disease whose course at best can be slowed by lifestyle change and medication. Based upon solid science—some old and some new—we beg to differ. Perhaps it’s time for a paradigm change. There are few times in the lives of medical scientists where we have the opportunity to change the course of a major medical disease; and even fewer cases where we actually succeed in doing so. In 1920, Banting’s discovery that injected insulin could control type 1 diabetes (T1D) was such an event. As a result, over the last century, millions of people with T1D have achieved long and productive lives; whereas before 1920 most of them would have succumbed to this insulin-deficiency disease within less than a year. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), on the other hand, is a very different disease that affects hundreds of millions of people. It responds very poorly to injected insulin. Whereas T1D patients cannot make insulin, people with T2D typically make lots of insulin but are resistant to insulin’s effects across a variety of cellular functions. Despite these facts having been known for 5 decades, we are taught that the core components of T2D management are to force the body to make even more insulin or to inject more insulin to overcome the insulin resistance that characterizes this disease. But in study after study, intensive management of type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Question About Keto And Metformin?

Question About Keto And Metformin?

Raynne413 Posts: 1,524Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,524Member, Premium Member I'm on metformin as well, and I would be curious as to what your doctor tells you, if you wouldn't mind reporting back, because I was wondering the same thing. I take my metformin first thing in the morning, after my lunch around 3, and then at bedtime, and I've noticed that by the time I get home from work in the afternoon, around 5, I'm usually feeling sick to my stomach, tired, and shaky, so now I'm wondering if it is from my afternoon dose. KnitOrMiss Posts: 9,918Member Member Posts: 9,918Member Member My doctor recommended staying on Met as it helped with my insulin resistance, but as I added more dairy, it wasn't worth the dumping complication for me personally. Not everyone has that. Since I am doing well staying with my diet plan, and my IR is minimal, I'm able to manage it to 90-95% of the Metformin levels through my Keto diet. I don't believe there is much risk of low blood sugar with it (there was some research a while back), but after adjusting dietarily, you may be able to reduce or stop your dosages eventually. But you may not. Some people's insulin resistance don't get better using diet or it may take a long LONG time to restore your metabolism's "health." So this is very much and individual situation, based on how your body responds. However, if you struggle to stay on plan, it is unlikely that you would ever be able to stop this medication, because low carb eating requires patience and persistence for success. It's not a quick fix... Metformin only works, as I understand it, by making your body see the insulin it has already created instead of making more and continuing the raging hunger cycle that is IR. So since Metformin doesn't create or increase insulin, there should n Continue reading >>

Who Should Not Follow A Keto Diet

Who Should Not Follow A Keto Diet

Some precautions must be made clear; In order to follow this or any other diet program, you must first undergo a health screen to rule out any rare conditions or contraindications with your health or medications with a ketogenic diet. this diet is not appropriate for people with any stage of kidney disease, or any pre-existing liver, pancreatic or kidney issues or conditions. Some rare conditions such as Muscular Dystrophy and other conditions may complicate and severely distress the pancreas, liver or kidneys. this diet is not appropriate under any circumstances if you currently have blood sugar issues such as hypoglycaemia or type 1 diabetes. It may or may not be appropriate if you have type 2 diabetes and on any medications for diabetes, and will require doctor supervision. this diet may not be appropriate or safe for people who are pregnant, nursing or who have Gestational Diabetes. this diet may not be appropriate for anyone suffering or recovered from an eating disorder. by agreeing to these terms, you are affirming that you do not have any of the above medical conditions, and you are proceeding at your own risk, with your doctor's approval. There are also other considerations such as the possibility that you may need to rapidly change your medications while on this diet. If you are considering the Ketogenic Diet, it is important to speak with your physician or endocrinologist, especially if you have any kind of medical condition, to develop a plan. Before starting any diet, you should speak to your doctor. You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professiona Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Lead To Faster Weight Loss When Used In Conjunction With A Low Carb Or Keto Diet?

Will Metformin Lead To Faster Weight Loss When Used In Conjunction With A Low Carb Or Keto Diet?

afefdrvuqb BbcyIFFqI NjxLaGheclRanKXoHhZPMaYlFrakMtMed Can your DNA tell you which foods are the best for your personal diet? I've heard that some DNA tests can tell you if you need high/low c... The short answer is yes. Based on your DNA, your body is better suited for some foods than others. This company found that 45% of peoples genes need a high carb diet, 47% need ... Answered Nov 23, 2019 Author has 316 answers and 61.8k answer views Metformin knwn t b marginally beneficial fr weight loss. Hw d t d that? Metformin stimulates th breakdown f fat. It l lowers ur blood glucose, whh leads t l insulin needing t b released. Sn insulin a fat storing hormone, lower insulin levels mk ur stored bd fat mr accessible. Yu hv plenty f energy stored fat, b making th stores accessible ur metabolism n rl n mr fat fr energy; th helps normalize appetite nd lose excess bd fat. An overproduction f insulin n eventually lead t insulin resistance. Th th phenomenon wh... Metformin knwn t b marginally beneficial fr weight loss. Hw d t d that? Metformin stimulates th breakdown f fat. It l lowers ur blood glucose, whh leads t l insulin needing t b released. Sn insulin a fat storing hormone, lower insulin levels mk ur stored bd fat mr accessible. Yu hv plenty f energy stored fat, b making th stores accessible ur metabolism n rl n mr fat fr energy; th helps normalize appetite nd lose excess bd fat. An overproduction f insulin n eventually lead t insulin resistance. Th th phenomenon whrb cells bm l nd l responsive t insulin mr nd mr f t needed t perform t action. Hn, th insulin-lowering fft f Metformin ll beneficial fr people wh r insulin resistant. Diabetics arent th nl n wh r insulin resistant. Mn people l hv prediabetes (often wthut knowing it) r m kind f underlying insulin resistance. Hvng Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

Metformin And Ketosis

Metformin And Ketosis

Another twist in my never-ending saga. I started Metformin about 11 days ago and worked my way up to 1500mg so far. I haven't noticed any difference in BG (yet), but I have a lower level of urine ketones. If anything I'm eating LESS carbs and less food in general (Metformin is suppressing my appetite); I used to eat 30gram of carb or less, now I make sure I eat my protein first and often don't feel like eating anything else, so I'm probably down to 15-20 grams of carbs/day. Yet ketones have dropped to a 'trace' level (they've been consistently 'small' to 'moderate' levels since I started testing last summer). Any idea why? Sometimes metformin can take up to 3-4 weeks to build up in your system. I'm not sure about the ketones, since I never test mine. I had to raise my metformin over 2 years to 2550 before I saw significant bg dropping. I have found though that my appetite is much smaller at meals, so I tend to eat more mini meals througout the day. Sometimes metformin can take up to 3-4 weeks to build up in your system. I'm not sure about the ketones, since I never test mine. I had to raise my metformin over 2 years to 2550 before I saw significant bg dropping. I have found though that my appetite is much smaller at meals, so I tend to eat more mini meals througout the day. I did find some posts on low carb forums saying that people couldn't get in to ketosis on Metformin until they went to the highest dose. I was going to stay at 1000mg, but I wasn't having any side effects, so I raised it to1500mg. Maybe next week I'll go to 2000mg. I've stopped gaining weight since I stopped insulin (about 3 weeks ago), but I'm not losing it. Why does weight only go one way (up) for me? I would raise it slowly. I started out on 500 and went to 1000 within a month, then to 1700 in ab Continue reading >>

Metformin And Low Carbing , Ketosis..

Metformin And Low Carbing , Ketosis..

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Metformin/Biguanides ' started by Sutherlandlass , Mar 15, 2016 . Sutherlandlass Type 2 Well-Known Member Hi folks, I hope someone can clarify something for me please? I am on my second month of metformin, the first was called Gluciet sr, which mentioned nothing about ketosis itself, only ketoacidosis. Is this completely different from ketosis? The current prescription came and it's a metformin called metabet sr. I take the same dose just one 500mg tablet each day with or after my evening meal. The leaflet in this one says, do not take metabet sr if you have ketosis?! I am low carbing, and getting good by results, I drink plenty of water... Does anyone know if this "is" safe or not? I have a telephone consultation booked with my gp, but he doesn't seem to have as much knowledge as you folks on here sometimes! I don't want to be causing injury to myself!! Looking forward to hearing from you folks.. Many thanks, feeling really anxious about this! Probably should have done some basic research before jumping into all of this. These are things you should know beforehand so you don't worry yourself like you're doing now. Nonetheless, to answer your question nutritional ketosis and DKA (ketoacidosis) are completely different situations caused by completely different circumstances. Nutritional ketosis essentially means your body transitions into a state where it gets more energy from fat (ketones) rather than glucose. Most people are in glycolysis which means they get more energy from glucose. Ketoacidosis is essentially a condition where the pH of your blood becomes so acidic that you can basically poison yourself into a coma. You're talking Continue reading >>

Metformin & Keto... Can I Do Both?

Metformin & Keto... Can I Do Both?

Hello, I started a slight keto diet on July 30th (I say slight because I started eating between 30-60g per day of carbs- a significant reduction compared to the hundreds of grams of carbs I would normally consume per meal) and I did that for 2 weeks and lost 16lbs. On 8/20/18 I got serious and changed my numbers to 20g of carbs per day. I felt sick on days 2 and 3 but completely better by day 5. I tested for ketones at home that week and was between 1.5 and 4 mmol/L up until 4 days ago. 4 days ago my Endo decided to put me back on Metformin for PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome). Ive been on Metformin for 4 days now and surprisingly it hasnt made me sick with nausea and diarrhea as is has in the past (when I was eating crazy large amounts of carbs) but when I tested my ketone levels this morning I was at 8 mmol/L. Should I be worried?? From what Ive read, Metformin desensitizes you and makes you more sensitive to insulin but, Ive also read that eating a low carb diet will make you produce less insulin so I am confused because I am on a medication that makes me more sensitive to insulin but I also on a low carb diet which makes me produce less insulin? Can I be on Metformin and still stick to under 20g of carbs or should I slightly increase my carb intake to get my ketone levels back down to optimal ketosis levels??? I dont feel sick or anything just worried that my ketone levels are so high and Im not sure why.They werent as high prior to me starting the Metformin and Im wondering if it has anything to do with it. I also havent lost any more weight but I havent gained either. Its my understanding that the Metformin is to help you reduce blood sugar. Keep testing your blood sugar, and make notes for your next doctor checkup. If youre keeping a log of what you are eating Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What’s The Difference Between Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Ketosis and ketoacidosis sound similar and are sometimes confused, but don’t mistake these conditions for one another. These involve two different sets of circumstances with considerably different outlooks. Both are triggered by an increase of ketones in the body, which are acids released into the bloodstream when the body burns fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. But it’s how the body responds to this increase that sets ketosis and ketoacidosis apart from each other. RELATED: How to Tell the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbs What Is Ketosis and How Does the Process Work? “Ketosis is a natural state that occurs when you start to metabolize fat instead of sugar,” says Michael Greenfield, MD, endocrinologist and chief medical officer at El Camino Hospital in Palo Alto, California. “It occurs often when people fast and use up the stores of sugar in their body." To understand ketosis, it helps to understand how the body burns energy. Carbohydrates and fat are both energy sources, and the body typically burns carbs (sugar or glucose) first, and then fat. If there aren’t enough carbohydrates in your system, it begins to break down fat for energy, which puts your body into a state of ketosis. While in this state, the body becomes a fat-burning machine. For this reason, ketosis is the goal of many diets, particularly those that restrict carbohydrate intake and rely on fat for energy, such as the ketogenic diet. Understanding the Relationship Between the Ketogenic Diet and Ketosis “The ketogenic diet is a high-fat (60 to 80 percent of your total daily calories), moderate-protein (10 to 15 percent of your total daily calories), and low-carbohydrate diet (less than 10 percent of your total daily calories) that forces your body into ketosis, where it burns fa Continue reading >>

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

A keto-compliant salad featuring collard greens and bacon crumbles. Photo courtesy of Brian Ambrozy/FlickrType II diabetes is one of America's most ubiquitousand expensivechronic diseases. Patients often require a suite of pharmaceutical products to manage high blood glucose levels, and the complications that arise over the long term, ranging from loss of vision and limbs to kidney failure and coronary artery disease, strain the resources of patients, their families, and the health care system. The financial strain on insurance companies, employers, and Medicaid and Medicare is even more enormous. A 2013 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine put the lifetime direct medical costs for type II diabetes treatment at $124,000 for patients diagnosed in middle age. With nearly 30 million Americans affected by the disease, the American Diabetes Association estimates the national cost of direct diabetes care to be roughly $176 billion per year. But unlike type I diabetes, which is an autoimmune disorder that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, type II diabetes is a lifestyle disease, and thus reversible. Over time, people with type-II diabetes can be made more receptive to their own insulin, which in turn allows their bodies to effectively clear glucose from the blood without insulin medication. The trick for the vast majority of type II patients is as simple as losing weight. ("The relationship between obesity and diabetes is of such interdependence that the term 'diabesity' has been coined," two diabetes researchers wrote in 2005.) But that "trick" is actually pretty hard. Permanent weight loss without bariatric surgery is practically impossible at the population level. A 2014 study by Kaiser Permanente that looked at incidents of non-surgical dia Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin? (for Weight Loss, Diabetes And)

What Is Metformin? (for Weight Loss, Diabetes And)

Metformin is the most popular drug for type 2 diabetes. Its unique because unlike most other drugs it lowers blood sugar without increasing insulin secretion. Other diabetic drugs may cause you to secrete more insulin to lower blood sugar levels. This will only aggravate the underlying problems of insulin resistance and weight gain [ 1 ]. Metformin is also used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition of insulin resistance largely. Metformin is a mild insulin-sensitizing drug which may counteract insulin resistance. In this manner, it is thought to potentially lower the risk of endometrial cancers that are three times higher in women with PCOS. Recently, it gained a lot of attention as an anti-aging drug with lifespan extension potential. So is Metformin really this wonder drug? And how does it do all that its said to do? Metformin lowers glucose production in the liver and makes muscle cells more sensitive to insulin. These muscle cells can thus take up glucose more easily. So it reduces baseline fasting blood glucose levels in the first place. And, if blood glucose shoots up after a carb-rich meal say, itll also help lower those post-meal glucose spikes. Through this double impact on blood glucose levels, metformin can mitigate some of the damage caused by diabetes control for a while [ 2 , 3 ]. Metformin is usually the first drug prescribed to newly diagnosed diabetes patients. It cannot, however, stop the progression of diabetes as it doesnt address the underlying causes. And the dose is often increased over time and combined with other medications. When given to patients with prediabetes, metformin can decrease the risk to become diabetic. The medication is, however, less effective than lifestyle interventions. While metformin is a good option and ad Continue reading >>

A Pilot Study Of Ketogenic Diet And Metformin In Glioblastoma: Feasibility And Metabolic Imaging

A Pilot Study Of Ketogenic Diet And Metformin In Glioblastoma: Feasibility And Metabolic Imaging

Home > Open Clinical Trials > A Pilot Study of Ketogenic Diet and Metformin in Glioblastoma: Feasibility and Metabolic Imaging A Pilot Study of Ketogenic Diet and Metformin in Glioblastoma: Feasibility and Metabolic Imaging This clinical trial is for men and women with high-grade gliomas. Glucose (sugar) is thought to be a contributor to tumor growth. The ketogenic diet (a high fat, low carbohydrate diet) and metformin (a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat type 2 diabetes) are both known to lower blood glucose levels. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the tolerability of a ketogenic diet in conjunction with metformin and whether maintaining and the diet with metformin will have any effect on your tumor. Participants will continue on treatment as long as they are responding to therapy and not experiencing unacceptable side effects. Open to men and women above the age of 18 who have been diagnosed with high-grade gliomas. Participants must not have recurrent disease, must not have been exposed to bevacizumab, and cannot be taking insulin or other oral hypoglycemic. Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Pcos

Ketogenic Diet And Pcos

PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome) is a common disorder among reproductive-aged women. Emerging research suggests that a ketogenic or low-carb diet may improve hormonal regulation, weight control and other PCOS-related issues. This article takes a detailed look at PCOS and how carbohydrate restriction combined with other lifestyle changes may be helpful for women struggling with this condition. PCOS was originally named Stein-Leventhal syndrome for the researchers who first described it nearly 100 years ago. It's a common endocrine disorder that typically begins in adolescence or early adulthood and is one of the leading causes of infertility. Up to 20% of women of childbearing age are estimated to have PCOS, including as many as 70% that are undiagnosed ( 1 ). In PCOS, a woman's ovarian follicles fail to release an egg every 28 days as a result of hormonal imbalance: too much luteinizing hormone (LH) and not enough follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Therefore, instead of the egg maturing, it remains in the ovary and forms a small cyst. This process is repeated on a monthly basis, alternating between the two ovaries, leading to the formation of dozens of cysts over time. High levels of LH stimulate the production of excess androgens (male hormones, including testosterone), which suppress ovulation. In addition, women with PCOS have low levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which normally binds to testosterone in the blood. When SHBG is low, free testosterone rises. Besides interfering with ovulation, high levels of free testosterone can cause symptoms of masculinization. Finally, low levels of SHBG promote insulin resistance, and vice versa. 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals del Continue reading >>

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