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Metformin And Januvia Together

New Metformin Combo Drug Approved For Type 2 Diabetes

New Metformin Combo Drug Approved For Type 2 Diabetes

On August 8, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the oral combination medicine canagliflozin/metformin (brand name Invokamet) for Type 2 diabetes. Invokamet, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals, combines the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin with the commonly prescribed diabetes drug metformin. Invokamet is the first medicine to combine an SGLT2 inhibitor and metformin available in the United States. In the process of filtering the blood, the kidneys typically reabsorb all the filtered glucose and return it to the bloodstream. One of the main proteins responsible for this reabsorption is SGLT2. By inhibiting the action of SGLT2, canagliflozin blocks the reabsorption of glucose by the kidneys, promoting a loss of glucose in the urine and lowering blood glucose levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose production by the liver, as well as improving insulin sensitivity in the liver, muscle, and fat cells. Invokamet tablets are approved for use in conjunction with diet and exercise in adults with Type 2 diabetes whose condition is not sufficiently controlled with either canagliflozin or metformin alone or who are already taking both medicines. Studies of Invokamet indicated that taking the medicine was equivalent to taking corresponding doses of canagliflozin and metformin as individual tablets. Invokamet comes in tablet strengths containing 50 milligrams or 150 milligrams of canagliflozin and 500 milligrams or 1,000 milligrams of metformin, to be taken twice daily. This medicine should not be used to treat Type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening condition marked by a chemical imbalance in the body). The most common side effects of canagliflozin are female genital fungal infections, urinary tract in Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Januvia

Glipizide And Januvia

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I would like to know some of the success stories from people who are taking these.Are they better off taking them at a certain time of day than other times?What really works for the majority?Mine says for Glipizide 10 mg take twice a day.Januvia 100 mg once a day.Been taking Glipizide in the morning and one at lunch and Januvia at supper.Would it be better if I took the Januvia at lunch and Glipizide morning and at supper?It is not specified exactly.What would be worth trying?I want to get my fasting numbers down.Then maybe my bedtime ones will go down as well. If your glipizide says twice daily, generally that means you should take 2 doses, 12 hrs apart, so if you take it at 6 a.m., you then would take it again at 6 pm. Do remember that glipizide works by stimulating insulin production so you may run the risk of having low blood sugars on it, esp. if you aren't eating regularly. You wouldn't want to take it at bedtime for fear of going low in your sleep. If you look on the Januvia web site, it mentions that it to help improve insulin production after meals when blood sugars are higher...so you would want to take it at some point during the day since it works on post-meal blood sugar. The Januvia website also mentions that taking it with sulfonylureas (glipizide falls into this class of meds) may cause low blood sugars. You take Januvia at the same time every day, once per day -- not with meals. If your glipizide says twice daily, generally that means you should take 2 doses, 12 hrs apart, so if you take it at 6 a.m., you then would take it again at 6 pm. Do remember that glipizide works by s Continue reading >>

Fixed-dose Combination Of Sitagliptin And Metformin For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fixed-dose Combination Of Sitagliptin And Metformin For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Pullman, WA, USA Correspondence: Jonathan K Reynolds, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, PO Box 646710, Pullman, WA 99164-6710, USA, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2009 Reynolds, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. JanumetTM, a fixed dose combination of sitagliptin/metformin HCL manufactured by Merck Pharmaceuticals, has received US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes, that are inadequately controlled, either by sitagliptin or metformin alone or together in free-dose combination form. Sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme DDP-4, assists patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to achieve glycemic control. It has been shown to be safe and effective at 100 mg daily doses. The effect of giving sitagliptin in combination with metformin is thought to have a complimentary and possibly additive effect on glycemic control. Keywords: sitagliptin, metformin, fixed-dose combination, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, DPP-4 inhibitor In 2007 it was estimated that 17.9 million Americans were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Additionally it was estimated that 5.7 million people had T2DM but were undiagnosed at the time. Together these numbers suggest that 23.6 million people or 7.8% of the population of the United States that have T2DM. In 2007 in the USA an estimated 1.6 million people were diagnosed with T2DM and that 57 million Americans over the age of 20 years have im Continue reading >>

Metformin And Januvia

Metformin And Januvia

Has anyone on here ever been on Januvia and Metformin at the same time? I am on 1,000 mg of Metformin and the doc just prescribed me the Januvia. What are some of the common side effects? What should I be looking for as far as any severe side effects? Much thanks in advance! We have several members who have posted here saying they take both meds. We also have other members who take the combo, Janumet, so you should have plenty of responses. And you can always search for the package inserts for both of them. It's a good idea to do this for all medications you take. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) I'm on both. Since adding Januvia, I find I can't/don't eat as much, like my stomach is full all the time. I'd like to add. I'm skinny, work in construction, and cannot afford to lose much more weight. It is a common combination. In fact there is a drug called Janumet which is Januvia and Metformin in the same pill. Januvia can cause a decrease in appetite. I was unable to take the M, but am on Januvia now. My appetitie has decreased but I have n ot lost weight. Hoping Jeanne will see this. She is on both and does okay on that combination. I increased fat to increase calories when I felt hungry -- that also may prevent weight loss...olives, avacadoes, cheese, cream, bacon. Ive been on Janumet for a couple of years now. 1000/50 twice a day. No side effects that Ive noticed. But, my BS control is better. In combo with Lantis my fasting BS is running below 90 consistently. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. I take 2000 mg of Metformin and 100 mg of Januvia. I find the Januvia works for about 10-12 hours. So I take it at my biggest meal to get the best bgs. Although my bgs haven't changed that much my HbA1 c dropped from 6.8 to 6.0 in 6 months on J Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J., June 14, 2014 - Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced results from a late-breaking observational study that assessed the differences in time to initiation of insulin use and the proportion of the population initiating insulin among patients with type 2 diabetes taking the combination of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin) and metformin, and patients taking the combination of a sulfonylurea and metformin. In this study, patients treated with a combination of JANUVIA and metformin initiated insulin therapy at a slower rate during the period of observation than patients treated with a combination of sulfonylurea and metformin. "Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, so that over time many patients need to add insulin to their treatment regimens to maintain blood sugar control," said Peter Stein, M.D., vice president, Clinical Research for diabetes and endocrinology, Merck Research Laboratories. "This study provides insight about different oral treatment regimens and their possible effect on initiation of insulin under real-world conditions. Real-world research is an important complement to clinical trials as we seek to improve patient health outcomes." JANUVIA is indicated, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUVIA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUVIA. JANUVIA is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to sitagliptin, such as anaphylaxi Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

Januvia and Metformin are both oral diabetes drugs that are used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic condition where a person cannot make enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone that is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone works by transporting glucose into the body tissues where it is stored and used for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the cells. This leads to a build up of glucose in the bloodstream, which, if not treated, could lead to life threatening conditions. People with type 2 diabetes and a valid prescription can take Januvia and Metformin as a combination medicine together with exercise and diet to control blood sugar levels. However, you should not take these medications to treat type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin as a result of the immune system mistakenly attacking the beta cells. What is Januvia? Januvia is the brand name of sitagliptin and works by regulating the amount of insulin that is produced after taking a meal. You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to sitagliptin or in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. This medication is not supposed to be taken by anyone who is below the age of 18. You can take it with or without food. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes drug which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the brand name of glucophage. This medication can be taken in combination with other medications to control blood sugar levels. The medication works in the body by reducing the amount of glucose that is produced in the liver and decreasing glucose ab Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

What type of drug is Metformin Metformin is a Generic name for a drug with antihyperglycemic properties that is used for treating non – insulin – dependent diabetes mellitus. This drug can improve glucose levels in blood by decreasing the production of glucose in liver, decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose and increasing insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Therapy with metformin may also decrease the risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other diabetes-related complications. Metformin can induce weight loss and that’s why it is the drug of choice for obese patients with diabetes type two. When it is used alone, this drug doesn’t cause hypoglycemia as side effect; but, it may potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylureas drugs and insulin if they are used together. Metformin is available in the form of tablet in following dosage forms: 500, 750, 850 and 1000 mg. It is usually taken during meals. Common Brand names on the market containing metformin as an active ingredient are: Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Metformin Sandoz, Diabex, Diaformin, Siofor, Metfogamma and Riomet. What is Januvia Januvia is a Brand name for a drug containing sitagliptin as an active ingredient. It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control sugar levels in blood. Januvia works by regulating insulin levels that body produces after eating. This drug is used for the treatment of patints with type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used in combination with other diabetes medicines, but is not used for treating type 1- diabetes. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis should not use Januvia. Januvia is available in tablet and film-coated tablet form in following strenghts: 25, 50 and 100 mg. Common Brand names on the market containing sitagliptin as an active ingredie Continue reading >>

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinkin Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs. Januvia For Weight Loss

Metformin Vs. Januvia For Weight Loss

Marketed as treatment options for patients diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, Metformin and Januvia work in the body similarly by controlling your blood glucose levels and by helping your body better use its own insulin. Metformin is the drug name for Glucophage, produced and sold by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Sitagliptin is the drug name for Januvia, produced and sold by Merck Pharmaceuticals. Obesity and lack of physical activity can contribute to insulin resistance. Reduction of insulin resistance has benefits that can lead to reduced hunger and weight loss. Video of the Day The primary source of energy for the human body is glucose. Food that you eat is turned into glucose, also called blood sugar. When the amount of sugar in your blood rises, your pancreas makes insulin to help your cells be able to use the glucose. When insulin levels rise, excess glucose in your bloodstream will be stored as body fat. According to Mayo Clinic, insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand. With drug therapy, insulin levels can be normalized, possibly halting weight gain. The National Institutes of Health states that insulin resistance is a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it properly. If you are insulin resistant, your muscle, fat and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin. As a result, your body needs more insulin to help glucose enter cells. This increase in insulin often causes people who are insulin resistant to put on extra pounds since more glucose can be stored. The National Institutes of Health’s Medline Drug Library declares that metformin helps to control the amount of blood sugar in your blood. It decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also i Continue reading >>

Januvia + Metformin = Janumet

Januvia + Metformin = Janumet

Less is more with this new diabetes pill out from Merck. It combines two favorites in one formulation – one is metformin, a veteran of diabetes drugs, and the other is Januvia, a promising rookie. If it’s appropriate for you to be on both these drugs, this new combination pill means one co-pay and an easier routine. Metformin and Januvia, a DPP-4 inhibitor, target different areas of the body: metformin decreases glucose production by the liver and Januvia increases insulin secretion by the pancreas, both acting in different ways against hyperglycemia. We’ve heard from doctors that the drugs work better together. The pill is taken twice a day, rather than Januvia’s once a day, though metformin is also once or twice a day. Doctors may prefer you start with metformin, as they may want to determine your optimal dose of that drug first (metformin dosing differs person to person), and insurance may not cover starting directly on the combination. Insurers may change, as more healthcare professionals are calling for earlier and more aggressive therapy. Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some ext Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

The FDA approved JANUMET® XR (sitagliptin and metformin hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release) tablets, a treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin, which is the active component of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin), with extended-release metformin…. JANUMET XR provides a convenient once-daily treatment option for patients who need help to control their blood sugar. JANUMET XR is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes when treatment with both sitagliptin and extended-release metformin is appropriate. JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUMET XR has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using JANUMET XR. The FDA approved JANUMET XR based upon a clinical bioequivalence study that demonstrated that administration of JANUMET XR was equivalent to co-administration of corresponding doses of the two individual medications, sitagliptin and metformin HCl extended- release. Extended-release metformin was as effective as immediate-release metformin. The labeling for JANUMET XR contains a boxed warning for lactic acidosis, a rare, but serious complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation. JANUMET XR is contraindicated in patients with renal impairment (e.g., serum creatinine levels ≥1.5 mg/dL for men, ≥1.4 mg/dL for women or abnormal creatinine clearance), which may also result from conditions such as cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute myocardial infarction, and septicemia; hypersensitivity to metformin HCl; acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Community Answers No, The two drugs are virtually identical. If both of the drugs are taken together may potentiate the risk of hypoglycemia. Yes Januvia can be taken with any other medication for Type 2 diabetes. There are studies in the prescribing information of januvia used in combination with glipizide, metformin, insulin. There are no contraindications to take the two products together, however, it is recommended to closely monitor patients hypoglycemia when januvia is used together with any sulfolyurea like glipizide. I take glipizide, metformin at their max dose and januvia (a newbie med). My diabetes is still out of control. my weight does not change. I eat no refined sugars. In the last 18 months my digestion has changed so dramatically that I can eat nothing but bland foods (mostly cereals). Know more here READ THESE NEXT: Can a new diabetes drug also help my mother lose weight? Essential Info About Type 2 Diabetes Drugs When Blood Sugar High Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Generic Name: metformin and sitagliptin (met FOR min and SI ta glip tin) Brand Name: Janumet, Janumet XR What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Metformin and sitagliptin is a combination medicine that is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Before taking this medicine You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin or sitagliptin (Januvia), or if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure metformin and sitagliptin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (your kidney function may need to be checked before you take this medicine); liver disease; heart disease; pancreatitis; high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); gallstones; or alcoholism. Some people takin Continue reading >>

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