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Metformin And Januvia Combination Pill

For Strong A1c Reductions, Add Januvia To Metformin In High-baseline Patients1

For Strong A1c Reductions, Add Januvia To Metformin In High-baseline Patients1

As an adjunct to diet and exercise for appropriate patients with type 2 diabetes Raz I, Chen Y, Wu M, et al., Efficacy and safety of sitagliptin added to ongoing metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, Current Medical Research Opinion. 2008;24(2):537–550, copyright © 2008, Informa Healthcare. Reproduced with permission of Informa Healthcare. Similar rates of hypoglycemia and no weight gain vs placebo In this study, patients taking JANUVIA had a similar incidence of hypoglycemia compared with patients taking placebo (1.0% vs 0.0%) JANUVIA also demonstrated a neutral effect on body weight (decrease in mean body weight of 1.1 lb with both placebo and JANUVIA) When added to a sulfonylurea (glimepiride) or insulin, patients treated with sitagliptin experienced increased incidence of hypoglycemia and a mean increase in body weight Hypoglycemia: 12.2% for patients treated with sitagliptin + glimepiride ± metformin vs 1.8% for placebo + glimepiride ± metformin; 15.5% for patients treated with sitagliptin + insulin ± metformin vs 7.8% for placebo + insulin ± metformin. A lower dose of sulfonylurea or insulin may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia Weight gain: +1.8 lb for patients treated with sitagliptin + glimepiride ± metformin vs –0.9 lb for placebo + glimepiride ± metformin; +0.2 lb for patients treated with sitagliptin + insulin ± metformin vs +0.2 lb for placebo + insulin ± metformin JANUVIA is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUVIA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancr Continue reading >>

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J., June 14, 2014 - Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced results from a late-breaking observational study that assessed the differences in time to initiation of insulin use and the proportion of the population initiating insulin among patients with type 2 diabetes taking the combination of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin) and metformin, and patients taking the combination of a sulfonylurea and metformin. In this study, patients treated with a combination of JANUVIA and metformin initiated insulin therapy at a slower rate during the period of observation than patients treated with a combination of sulfonylurea and metformin. "Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, so that over time many patients need to add insulin to their treatment regimens to maintain blood sugar control," said Peter Stein, M.D., vice president, Clinical Research for diabetes and endocrinology, Merck Research Laboratories. "This study provides insight about different oral treatment regimens and their possible effect on initiation of insulin under real-world conditions. Real-world research is an important complement to clinical trials as we seek to improve patient health outcomes." JANUVIA is indicated, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUVIA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUVIA. JANUVIA is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to sitagliptin, such as anaphylaxi Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

The FDA approved JANUMET® XR (sitagliptin and metformin hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release) tablets, a treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin, which is the active component of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin), with extended-release metformin…. JANUMET XR provides a convenient once-daily treatment option for patients who need help to control their blood sugar. JANUMET XR is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes when treatment with both sitagliptin and extended-release metformin is appropriate. JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUMET XR has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using JANUMET XR. The FDA approved JANUMET XR based upon a clinical bioequivalence study that demonstrated that administration of JANUMET XR was equivalent to co-administration of corresponding doses of the two individual medications, sitagliptin and metformin HCl extended- release. Extended-release metformin was as effective as immediate-release metformin. The labeling for JANUMET XR contains a boxed warning for lactic acidosis, a rare, but serious complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation. JANUMET XR is contraindicated in patients with renal impairment (e.g., serum creatinine levels ≥1.5 mg/dL for men, ≥1.4 mg/dL for women or abnormal creatinine clearance), which may also result from conditions such as cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute myocardial infarction, and septicemia; hypersensitivity to metformin HCl; acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Two-in-one: Combination Pills

Two-in-one: Combination Pills

Combination Meds What do a Swiss Army knife, Pantene Pro-V Full & Thick 2-in-1 Shampoo+Conditioner, and Glucovance have in common? They're all combination products, designed to save you time, money, or both. Drug companies are introducing more combo medications -- two drugs in one pill -- to take advantage of patent expirations and competition from generics. Glucovance is a combination of glyburide and metformin, two medications that help people with type 2 control blood glucose. Most combination pills deliver just two different types of medicine. Usually the two meds work together to treat one disease in different ways. Some pills contain two drugs to treat conditions that commonly occur together, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Diabetes Combo Pills Actoplus Met: Combines Actos and metformin Avandamet: Combines Avandia and metformin Avandaryl: Combines Avandia and glimepiride Duetact: Combines Actos and glimepiride Glucovance: Combines glyburide and metformin Janumet: Combines Januvia and metformin Metaglip: Combines glipizide and metformin The Upside of Combo Pills Combination diabetes drugs can encourage people to take medications as prescribed -- and can save them money, says Shannon Miller, a professor of pharmacy practice at Albany College of Pharmacy in New York. Typically, insurance companies charge a copay for each prescription received. Combination pills require just one copay, even though you're getting two medications, she says. For Jack (last name withheld to protect privacy), who has type 2 diabetes, switching to combination drugs to control blood glucose, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol cut his number of daily pills from 11 to seven. He saves $40 a month on copays, for an annual savings of $480. Although costs vary based on spe Continue reading >>

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinkin Continue reading >>

New Combination Treatments In The Management Of Diabetes: Focus On Sitagliptin Metformin

New Combination Treatments In The Management Of Diabetes: Focus On Sitagliptin Metformin

New combination treatments in the management of diabetes: focus on sitagliptin metformin Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Durham, North Carolina, USA Correspondence: Jennifer B Green Duke University Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, DUMC Box 3222, Baker House Room 280, Durham, NC 27710, USA, Tel +1 919 684 5568, Fax +1 919 681 7796 Email [email protected] Copyright 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent condition worldwide. The complications of this disease are known to significantly increase the morbidity and mortality of those affected, resulting in substantial direct and indirect costs. Although good glycemic control has been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetes-related microvascular complications, blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled in most individuals with diabetes. The reasons for this are many, and include issues such as poor adherence to complex medication regimes; costs of prescribed therapies; and the failure of traditionally prescribed medications to preserve beta cell function over time. However, our armamentarium of glucose-lowering drugs has expanded recently with the development of medications that act via the incretin pathway. Sitagliptin, the first commercially available dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, inhibits the metabolism and inactivation of the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP. The subsequent elevation in levels of these hormones and associated prolongation of their actions has been shown to increase insulin secretion and suppress glucagon secretion in a glucose-appropriate fashion. Sitagliptin therapy i Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia®?[open]

What Is Januvia®?[open]

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

Januvia and Metformin are both oral diabetes drugs that are used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic condition where a person cannot make enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone that is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone works by transporting glucose into the body tissues where it is stored and used for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the cells. This leads to a build up of glucose in the bloodstream, which, if not treated, could lead to life threatening conditions. People with type 2 diabetes and a valid prescription can take Januvia and Metformin as a combination medicine together with exercise and diet to control blood sugar levels. However, you should not take these medications to treat type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin as a result of the immune system mistakenly attacking the beta cells. What is Januvia? Januvia is the brand name of sitagliptin and works by regulating the amount of insulin that is produced after taking a meal. You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to sitagliptin or in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. This medication is not supposed to be taken by anyone who is below the age of 18. You can take it with or without food. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes drug which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the brand name of glucophage. This medication can be taken in combination with other medications to control blood sugar levels. The medication works in the body by reducing the amount of glucose that is produced in the liver and decreasing glucose ab Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Generic Name: metformin and sitagliptin (met FOR min and SI ta glip tin) Brand Name: Janumet, Janumet XR What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Metformin and sitagliptin is a combination medicine that is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Before taking this medicine You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin or sitagliptin (Januvia), or if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure metformin and sitagliptin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (your kidney function may need to be checked before you take this medicine); liver disease; heart disease; pancreatitis; high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); gallstones; or alcoholism. Some people takin Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

What type of drug is Metformin Metformin is a Generic name for a drug with antihyperglycemic properties that is used for treating non – insulin – dependent diabetes mellitus. This drug can improve glucose levels in blood by decreasing the production of glucose in liver, decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose and increasing insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Therapy with metformin may also decrease the risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other diabetes-related complications. Metformin can induce weight loss and that’s why it is the drug of choice for obese patients with diabetes type two. When it is used alone, this drug doesn’t cause hypoglycemia as side effect; but, it may potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylureas drugs and insulin if they are used together. Metformin is available in the form of tablet in following dosage forms: 500, 750, 850 and 1000 mg. It is usually taken during meals. Common Brand names on the market containing metformin as an active ingredient are: Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Metformin Sandoz, Diabex, Diaformin, Siofor, Metfogamma and Riomet. What is Januvia Januvia is a Brand name for a drug containing sitagliptin as an active ingredient. It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control sugar levels in blood. Januvia works by regulating insulin levels that body produces after eating. This drug is used for the treatment of patints with type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used in combination with other diabetes medicines, but is not used for treating type 1- diabetes. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis should not use Januvia. Januvia is available in tablet and film-coated tablet form in following strenghts: 25, 50 and 100 mg. Common Brand names on the market containing sitagliptin as an active ingredie Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Proper Use Drug information provided by: Micromedex Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Your dose may need to be changed several times in order to find out what works best for you. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to. This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. Metformin and sitagliptin combination should be taken with meals to help reduce any stomach upset. Take the extended-release tablets as directed in the evening. Swallow the extended-release tablet or immediate-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your diabetes, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. While taking Janumet® XR, you may see tablets in your stools. If you see tablets in your stool several times, tell your doctor right away. Do not stop taking this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine. For type 2 diabetes: For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets): Fo Continue reading >>

Januvia + Metformin = Janumet

Januvia + Metformin = Janumet

Less is more with this new diabetes pill out from Merck. It combines two favorites in one formulation – one is metformin, a veteran of diabetes drugs, and the other is Januvia, a promising rookie. If it’s appropriate for you to be on both these drugs, this new combination pill means one co-pay and an easier routine. Metformin and Januvia, a DPP-4 inhibitor, target different areas of the body: metformin decreases glucose production by the liver and Januvia increases insulin secretion by the pancreas, both acting in different ways against hyperglycemia. We’ve heard from doctors that the drugs work better together. The pill is taken twice a day, rather than Januvia’s once a day, though metformin is also once or twice a day. Doctors may prefer you start with metformin, as they may want to determine your optimal dose of that drug first (metformin dosing differs person to person), and insurance may not cover starting directly on the combination. Insurers may change, as more healthcare professionals are calling for earlier and more aggressive therapy. Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some ext Continue reading >>

New Metformin Combo Drug Approved For Type 2 Diabetes

New Metformin Combo Drug Approved For Type 2 Diabetes

On August 8, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the oral combination medicine canagliflozin/metformin (brand name Invokamet) for Type 2 diabetes. Invokamet, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals, combines the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin with the commonly prescribed diabetes drug metformin. Invokamet is the first medicine to combine an SGLT2 inhibitor and metformin available in the United States. In the process of filtering the blood, the kidneys typically reabsorb all the filtered glucose and return it to the bloodstream. One of the main proteins responsible for this reabsorption is SGLT2. By inhibiting the action of SGLT2, canagliflozin blocks the reabsorption of glucose by the kidneys, promoting a loss of glucose in the urine and lowering blood glucose levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose production by the liver, as well as improving insulin sensitivity in the liver, muscle, and fat cells. Invokamet tablets are approved for use in conjunction with diet and exercise in adults with Type 2 diabetes whose condition is not sufficiently controlled with either canagliflozin or metformin alone or who are already taking both medicines. Studies of Invokamet indicated that taking the medicine was equivalent to taking corresponding doses of canagliflozin and metformin as individual tablets. Invokamet comes in tablet strengths containing 50 milligrams or 150 milligrams of canagliflozin and 500 milligrams or 1,000 milligrams of metformin, to be taken twice daily. This medicine should not be used to treat Type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening condition marked by a chemical imbalance in the body). The most common side effects of canagliflozin are female genital fungal infections, urinary tract in Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin/metformin (janumet) As Combination Therapy In The Treatment Of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

Sitagliptin/metformin (janumet) As Combination Therapy In The Treatment Of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: INTRODUCTION Of the 25.8 million Americans with type-2 diabetes mellitus, 7 million of these individuals are unaware that they have the disease. Medical costs are 2.3 times higher in patients with diabetes, with health care expenditures exceeding $174 billion annually.1 Complications include kidney failure, nontraumatic lower-extremity amputation, blindness, heart disease, and stroke. Type-2 diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Rather than recommending a specific hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) goal for all patients, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) recommend individualized treatment targets for each patient.2 Lifestyle changes, including weight loss and increased physical activity, can reduce blood glucose levels; however, the utility of such interventions is limited, and most patients need to begin pharmacotherapy.3 Metformin (Glucophage, Bristol-Myers Squibb) is recommended in all patients at diagnosis unless contraindications exist.2 Despite the proven efficacy of metformin, blood glucose often remains uncontrolled with monotherapy.2 Outcomes with additional agents are not consistent and depend on multiple factors, including adherence to therapy, cost, adverse effects, and comorbid conditions. Combination therapy with a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, such as sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck), may be considered, especially as evidence of its safety and efficacy has become available. In February 2012, Merck announced the approval of a once-daily formulation of a sitagliptin/metformin combination (Janumet XR).4 This dosage form allows for diabetes treatment with multiple modes of action while affording patients the convenience of once-daily administration. Go to: PHARMACOLOGY Continue reading >>

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