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Metformin And Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

Keto Intermittent Fasting And Metformin Experiences? : Xxketo

Keto Intermittent Fasting And Metformin Experiences? : Xxketo

After scouring the Internet, I thought this might be the best place for my question! I'm usually a /r/keto lurker and have been for years. At this point, I've lost 110 lbs by following a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, I still have a substantial way to go. In order to lose weight, my calories have to stay below 1000. To be honest, that keeps me physically exhausted, but I can't consistently lose weigh by eating the standard 1200 calories. Dieticians have tried to raise my calories, but I stall and then gain. I've come to accept that I must eat about 950-1k calories a day, but it is still a painfully slow process. I have hypothyroidism and doctors speculate something else is up with my body. As a child, doctors blamed a "slow metabolism." My doctor also believes I may have insulin resistance going on. After seeing her yesterday, we decided to try Metformin 500 - once daily. I have done intermittent fasting for the past 6-7 months and this isn't my first time using it as a tool. I'm much happier eating this way. I don't usually get hungry and I feel satisfied while eating one large meal and having a protein shake later. Unfortunately, this doesn't seem to jive with what my doctor says about eating multiple meals, spaced out, every three hours. I am not diabetic and I have only ever had blood sugar issues when I was on oral prednisone, so I'm sure if this is very important. Does anyone else do intermittent fasting while on keto and using Metformin? How have your experiences been? Continue reading >>

Type Ii And Intermittent Fasting To Lose Weight? (metformin, Victoza, Blood) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Type Ii And Intermittent Fasting To Lose Weight? (metformin, Victoza, Blood) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Type II and Intermittent Fasting to lose weight? (Metformin, Victoza, blood) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search I am Type II (Diagnosed 2006) and on Metformin 1000mg/Glipizide 10mg a day. I also take Zocor 40mg for cholesterol and Lisinopril 20mg for BP.. I avoid all processed sugar. I do eat some carbs such as rice, corn, potatoes etc. I try to eat lean protein and keep the fats low. I really have a hard time losing weight it seems. Recently I was on a reduced calorie diet. I weigh 260 lbs and want to lose 50 lbs. I am 6'3" tall. I was restricted to 2150 calories a day. I was using a diary to keep count. Well, after over a month the scale hasn't moved. I am thinking of trying intermittent fasting for a while. I have not talked to a doctor about it. Maybe go for a day or two on just water / sugar free juice or maybe try to eat just one meal a day for several days. If I do this and while I am fasting should I stop taking the diabetes meds? Would the combination of not eating and taking the meds cause my BG to go too low? Last edited by gguerra; 07-15-2014 at 01:21 PM.. Be careful with fasting, even intermittent, and check your blood sugar often. Metformin does not act like insulin but watch out for the glipizide which can cause lows. I wouldn't recommend skipping your meds without your doctor's knowledge (permission) but rather watch your diet carefully and check your blood sugar often. Drink lots of water too. Your body might be burning fat and losing inches even when nothing shows on t Continue reading >>

Metformin | Drstegall.com

Metformin | Drstegall.com

Metformin is known as a drug for type 2 diabetes, so some might find it surprising that it is mentioned on a cancer website. In diabetes, metformindecreases glucose production by the liver, decreases the absorption of glucose in the intestines, and improves insulin resistance ofthe cells. Interestingly, metformin began to garner attention in cancer when a study found that diabetics on metformin have lower cancer rates than diabetics not on metformin.That was big news at the time, because diabetics are known to have higher rates of pancreatic, liver, colon, breast, bladder, uterine, and rectal cancers compared to non-diabetics. Metformin was derived from the French lilac (Galega officinalis), after it had been shown that this herb lowered blood sugar. The generic form is known as glucophage, meaning sugar eating. Metformin has been used as the first-line drug for diabetes in the United States for the past 20 years, and it has the advantage of lowering blood sugar levels safely without the risk of hypoglycemia (blood sugar which is too low). On a basic level, it makes sense that metformin reduces cancer cell growth and development. Becausewe know that cancer cells love sugar, a drug which helps the body reduce blood sugar levels should also prevent cancer from having as much food for growth. However, research into how metformin works on cancer cells suggests that it also inhibits what is called the mTOR pathway. The mTOR pathway is crucial to cancer cells acquiring energy, growing, and spreading. Metformin also reduces circulating levels of insulin (which is needed for cells to take up glucose), as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). We know that both insulin and IGF-1 play a role in cancer cells acquiring energy, so reducing both of these also seems to be impo Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes And Metformin

Intermittent Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes And Metformin

intermittent fasting with type 2 diabetes and metformin I have watched a brilliant programme about loosing weight by intermittent fasting, called the 5/2 diet. basically you eat for 5 days and then fast for 2 days. can i do this if I am on metformin for diabetes type 2. Would I still take the tablets on the fast days? has anybody else tried this diet before? fasting is definetely not recommended if you have diabetes, there are better ways for you to lose weight if you need to, such as increasing your day to day exercise and eating healthily and watching portion size. Metformin should only be taken with or after food so you should not take it on an empty stomach. Fasting can lead to adverse affects such as hypoglycaemia. metformin works to keep your blood sugar steady by increasing glucose uptake into large muscles, independent of how much glucose you eat in your diet, therefore it could make you very ill if you take your metformin without eating. The type of diet that you are talking about would not be safe for you, and there is a lot of research to show that steady weight loss over a long period of time is more likely to stay off. I applaud your wish to lose weight, this is definetely a good thing to do and may prevent your diabetes getting worse, but I strongly advise you look at an alternative way of doing this. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

Anyone done intermittent fasting? I've watched all of Dr. Fung's video, looked at a few studies and read a few blogs on it and I like the idea of losing weight while improving insulin sensitivity, retaining more lean mass and hopefully, keeping metabolic rate the same. I think I would be a good candidate since I haven't seen much liver dumping or dawn phenomenon. I was thinking of increasing carb + protein intake to 150g/day average, but still stay around the edge of nutritional ketosis most of the time. I have accomplished what I set out to do with the current very low carb keto diet with total weight loss of 33lbs but I fear this strategy has plateaued and I would like to drop another 17 lbs. So, my choice is going with either LCHF or Intermittent Fasting (perhaps do both?). While I do believe both are good/effective approaches, I am leaning towards intermittent fasting even though LCHF would be far easier for me to do. This would be a short-term trial only till end of December and I would still be eating to the metre in order to keep A1C less than 6.0. Any tips or success/not so successful stories or thoughts on Intermittent Fasting / protocol? Konjac Fiber, Vitamin C, Milk Thistle, Multi-vitamins D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Several have here when I do it I will stay in the 180 range without insulin, so it seems I have a good liver action after all these years. Several have here when I do it I will stay in the 180 range without insulin, so it seems I have a good liver action after all these years. Yes, I did see that. Fasting isn't going to be very effective with liver dumping. Fortunately, I don't have that issue - for the last blood test, I fasted 16 hrs or so, and my BG was 4.8 (86). I've skipped breakfasts before as well, and haven't noticed any B Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people already instinctively recognized to be true. Suppose y Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

November 5, 2010 by David Mendosa People often fast for cosmetic, religious, or medical reasons. About 14 percent of American adults have reported that they have fasted to help control their weight. But I have begun to fast intermittently because its the natural way to eat or not eat. That fasting may appear at first glance to be unnatural just shows how far we have departed from our heritage. Eating three squares a day is certainly not what our paleolithic ancestors did. And if our paleolithic ancestors seem light years away from modern humans, just remember that the paleolithic period extended until the agricultural revolution, which was only about 300 generations ago. Genetically, we have hardly changed at all since them. Articles by Dr. Michael Eades on his Protein Power blog first attracted my attention to intermittent fasting. The more I explored intermittent fasting, particularly in the work of Dr. Loren Cordain, like his book, The Paleo Diet, the more I knew that I had to check out that experience for myself. In the past couple of weeks I made two intermittent fasts. The first was for 12 hours from sunrise to sunset and the second was 24 hours from dinner one night to dinner the next. I drank only water, lemonade, and tea (both black and herbal). None with any calories. And plenty of it. My 12-hour fast was similar to that of Muslims during the month of Ramadan. But hardly the same and not as challenging. Since Muslims are the experts on fasting, I consulted with an imam, Ibrahim Kazerooni, before setting forth on my latest dietary experiment. He is both a friend and a member of my diabetes support group. Ibrahim explained that Muslims cant even drink water while fasting during the month of Ramadan. Their fasts last from 1 and 1/2 hours before sunrise until dus Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting – Questions & Answers

Intermittent Fasting – Questions & Answers

Here you can find common questions about intermittent fasting with answers from our top expert, Dr. Jason Fung. Choose a topic below or scroll down for every question and answer. Do you have other questions about fasting for Dr. Jason Fung? Watch our in-depth interview with him or ask him directly on our membership site (free trial). You can also visit Dr. Fung’s website IDMprogram.com. Who can use intermittent fasting? Is fasting an option for children who need to lose weight? Fasting is not an option for children. My advice is to severely restrict added sugars and snacking. Reducing down to 2 meals per day is also possible, but not longer duration fasting. My daughter who is 31 and a healthy weight exercises (rowing) four times a week. She wants to know if she can fast or is this not recommended for people who exercise? Not only is it safe, but training in the fasted state has several theoretical benefits that many elite level athletes are using. So, yes, it is highly recommended. Can women fast during pregnancy and after birth during breast feeding? I don’t advise fasting during pregnancy or breast feeding. Short term (<24 hrs) fasts are OK, but definitely not longer term fasts. There is a concern of nutrient deficiency which I think far outweighs any potential benefit. How should intermittent fasting be used in conjunction with resistance training to maximize muscle growth and fat burning? Should there be any differences between intermittent fasting on training days and non-training days? And during the fasting periods – or days – is it advisable to take supplements such as BCAA’s to prevent muscle loss? There are many different schedules. Most people fast for 24 hrs and then do their training – this is called ‘training in the fasted state’. Since gr Continue reading >>

More Practical Fasting Tips – Part 13

More Practical Fasting Tips – Part 13

A continuation of practical fasting tips. See Practical Fasting Tips. Will fasting make me tired? In our experience at the Intensive Dietary Management Clinic, the opposite is true. Many people find that they have more energy during a fast—probably due to increased adrenalin. Basal metabolism does not fall during fasting but rises instead. You’ll find you can perform all the normal activities of daily living. Persistent fatigue is not a normal part of fasting. If you experience excessive fatigue, you should stop fasting immediately and seek medical advice. Will fasting make me confused or forgetful? No. You should not experience any decrease in memory or concentration. The ancient Greeks believed that fasting significantly improved cognitive abilities, helping the great thinkers attain more clarity and mental acuity. Over the long term, fasting may actually help improve memory. One theory is that fasting activates a form of cellular cleansing called autophagy that may help prevent age-associated memory loss. I get dizzy when I fast. What can I do? Most likely, you’re becoming dehydrated. Preventing this requires both salt and water. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids. However, the low-salt intake on fasting days may cause some dizziness. Extra sea salt in broth or mineral water often helps alleviate the dizziness. Another possibility is that your blood pressure is too low—particularly if you’re taking medications for hypertension. Speak to your physician about adjusting your medications. I get headaches when I fast. What can I do? As above, try increasing your salt intake. Headaches are quite common the first few times you try a fast. It is believed that they’re caused by the transition from a relatively high-salt diet to very low salt intake on fasting days. Continue reading >>

Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes

Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes

Intermittent fasting can be an effective way of losing weight and helping you manage type 2 diabetes. Many members of our community are now free of diabetes medications, or have seen significant improvements in their condition. How does it work? Fasting will help you lose weight, and lowers insulin resistance. This means it tackles the root cause of type 2 diabetes. A word of warning: if you need insulin to control your diabetes you should not do intermittent fasting unless you have discussed your proposed fasting plan with your doctor – and unless you are very well trained in adjusting your insulin doses (for example by the DAPHNE programme) What should I know about fasting with type 2 diabetes? Start slowly If you have type 2 diabetes you may find the first fasts particularly difficult as your high circulating insulin levels will make it hard for your body to switch into fat burning. Thus, it may be wise to start fasting gently by allowing yourself more calories in a day, or by only doing short fasts to begin with. As your body adapts to fasting, you can lengthen your fasts. Experiment with different methods of fasting You may need to experiment with different methods of intermittent fasting to see which works best for you. Different people respond differently to fasting (and differently to different forms of fasting). For example, many members of our community with type 2 diabetes tell us that a daily eating window approach works better for them than 5:2, as it combines weight loss with relatively stable blood glucose levels. Learn more about eating windows and different ways of intermittent fasting Limit your carbohydrate intake To help keep your blood glucose under control you should limit all carbohydrates on both fast days and non-fast days. It is best to aim t Continue reading >>

Metformin: Hype And Reality

Metformin: Hype And Reality

The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been in the news a lot lately, because clinical trials for the purpose of anti-aging are under way. See for example, Diabetes drug metformin could increase human lifespan to 120 years. Some of this news is not really new, since weve known for a number of years that metformin increases lifespan in worms and mice. ( 1 ) But a clinical trial of metformin for human anti-aging is news, as this is the first time any drug has been tested for this purpose on humans. It may sound strange, but because the FDA doesnt consider aging to be a disease, clinical anti-aging trials have not been permitted, until now. Metformin is a cheap, off-patent, generic drug marketed under the trade name Glucophage and is used to treat diabetes. The plant known as French lilac is the original source of metformin, and was used to treat diabetes since at least the Middle Ages if not earlier. Metformin decreases blood glucose by repressing glucose production in the liver. It increases insulin sensitivity and reduces hyperinsulinemia (high blood insulin). Perhaps most importantly for its mechanism of action, it activates AMPK . See the following illustration, and note the presence of metformin at the top. AMPK is a highly evolutionarily conserved cellular energy sensing mechanism. By evolutionarily conserved is meant that it is found in a wide range of organisms, from worms to humans, the forces of natural selection having preserved it for its great usefulness. Activation of AMPK tells the organism that energy levels are low, and puts all cellular machinery into a state of energy conservation. Fat storage is blocked, muscle synthesis stops, and glucose is burned. AMPK activation by metformin or any other means Metformin, by activating AMPK, functions as a fasting mi Continue reading >>

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Metformin And Diabetes: Trouble In Paradise

Popular Drug Damages Your Cells But Fasting Delivers Energy Jessica came to see me because she had been diagnosed with a condition that is becoming more and more common – PCOS. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is a problem of the adrenal glands that causes: Irregular menstrual cycles Easy fatiguing And even diabetes Jessica was prescribed a diabetes medication called metformin (tradename Glucophage) that seems to help metabolic problems. It also allows people to burn fat so they stop gaining weight. This drug is a first-line therapy for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and has been used for many years. It has the effect of making the body more sensitive to insulin and blocking the liver from putting out more sugar. The net effect of this is to lower blood sugar levels. However, metformin’s specific action reaches deeper into your cells. It blocks the mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cells of your body, from using sugar efficiently. When cells are unable to use sugar, they must switch to fat-burning mode. With the ability to burn fat, the body has lower sugar levels and can actually lose weight! The effect of metformin has been trumpeted for many years. Metformin: Decreases blood glucose Increases fat use Prevents kidney problems Improves PCOS in women Prevents diabetes Lowers cancer rates [1] Because of these effects metformin is now being considered and used for many conditions including: Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Cancers of all types Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Obesity Indeed, as one of my professors stated, it seems that metformin should be “included in the drinking water.” Everyone would supposedly benefit. Many without diabetes, PCOS, or even pre-diabetes are taking it to prevent diabetes and cancer. Beware of Treating Disease with Metformin All of the symptoms and di Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fasting

Metformin And Fasting

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am prescribed 2 metformin a day. If I fast BT not eating after supper till lunch time next day when should I take metformin? Finsky Prefer not to say Well-Known Member I am prescribed 2 metformin a day. If I fast BT not eating after supper till lunch time next day when should I take metformin? I would take it first time I eat something and take evening doze when ever is latest time you are eating something. Metformin don't do any good for empty tummy and it is recommended to be taken with food. I am taking slow release Metformin and skip breakfast and lunch as often as I can. I am also on a nil carb diet. I find that my throat becomes very, very dry as soon as I take the Metformin, do you get this ? I am taking slow release Metformin and skip breakfast and lunch as often as I can. I am also on a nil carb diet. I find that my throat becomes very, very dry as soon as I take the Metformin, do you get this ? No dry throat. I am trying to drink more water. I bought the Obesity guide by Jung. Really informative. Upping fat intake I find hard after years of being brainwashed into having low fat foods. I am making slow but steady progress. Looking forward to my next hb1ac test. Let me know how you are getting on perhaps we can help each other Don't want to appear rude, but is there a reason to be fasting, medical or religious? I have been told that fasting is not necessary for Diabetics having blood tests. I also have a friend who is of the Islamic faith and he has special dispensation from her Iman during Ramadan due to his diabetes. Don't want to appear rude, but is there a reason to be fasting, medical or religious? I have been told that fasting is not n Continue reading >>

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